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329https://historysoa.com/items/show/329Index to The Author, Vol. 11 (1901)<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=49&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=Index+to+%3Cem%3EThe+Author%3C%2Fem%3E%2C+Vol.+11+%281901%29">Index to <em>The Author</em>, Vol. 11 (1901)</a><a href="https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390" target="_blank" rel="noopener">https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=51&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=Publication">Publication</a>; <a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=51&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=Index">Index</a>1901-The-Author-11-index<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=4&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=London">London</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=76&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=1901">1901</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=78&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=The+Society+of+Authors">The Society of Authors</a>; <a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=78&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=Horace+Cox">Horace Cox</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=89&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=11">11</a>https://historysoa.com/files/original/4/329/1901-The-Author-11-index.pdfpublications, The Author
330https://historysoa.com/items/show/330Periodicals and Their Contributors (1901)<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=49&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=%3Cem%3EPeriodicals+and+Their+Contributors%26nbsp%3B%3C%2Fem%3E%281901%29"><em>Periodicals and Their Contributors&nbsp;</em>(1901)</a>Provides a list of periodicals and their policies with regard to unsolicited manuscripts, especially whether or not manuscripts are returned to the author when rejected.<a href="https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390" target="_blank" rel="noopener">https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390</a><a href="https://historysoa.com/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=89&amp;advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&amp;advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=11&amp;sort_field=added">Supplement to&nbsp;<em>The Author</em>, Vol. 11</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=51&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=Publication">Publication</a>1901-Periodicals-and-their-Contributors<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=4&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=London">London</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=76&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=1901">1901</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=78&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=Bradbury%2C+Agnew+%26+Co.">Bradbury, Agnew &amp; Co.</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=89&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=11">11</a>19010501https://historysoa.com/files/original/4/330/1901-Periodicals-and-their-Contributors.pdfperiodicals, publications, publishing, The Author
331https://historysoa.com/items/show/331The Author, Vol. 11 Issue 01 (June 1900)<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=49&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=%3Cem%3EThe+Author%3C%2Fem%3E%2C+Vol.+11+Issue+01+%28June+1900%29"><em>The Author</em>, Vol. 11 Issue 01 (June 1900)</a><a href="https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390" target="_blank" rel="noopener">https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=51&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=Publication">Publication</a>1900-06-01-The-Author-11-1<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=76&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=1900-06-01">1900-06-01</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=89&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=11">11</a>11–1619000601ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> PRICE 68., Post 8vo.<br /> THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND POSITION<br /> AS APPEARING FROM<br /> STATUTES, ARTICLES, CANONS, RUBRICS, AND<br /> JUDICIAL DECISIONS.<br /> “It bath been the wisdom of the Church of England, ever since the first compiling of her Publick Liturgy, to keep<br /> the mean between the two extremes, of too much stiffness in refusing, and of too much easiness in admitting any<br /> variation from it.”—Prayer Book Preface.<br /> By J. M. LELY, M.A. Oxon., Barrister-at-law.<br /> LONDON: HORACE COX, WINDSOR HOUSE, BREAM&#039;S BUILDINGS, E.C.<br /> NOW READY, Price 18., with Illustrations.<br /> A PILGRIMAGE TO PARIS<br /> A Traveller&#039;s Companion.<br /> WITH CONCISE GUIDE, APPENDIX, AND PLAN<br /> OF EXHIBITION<br /> By A. F. MORRIS. Illustrated by M. D. HARDY and<br /> A. F. MORRIS.<br /> CONTENTS.<br /> Part I.-A Pilgrimage to Paris.<br /> Chop.<br /> 1. To the Beaux Arte, Invalides, Musée de Garde Menbles.<br /> VI.-Musée de Cluny, Gobelins, Palais de Luxembourg, Café<br /> II.-Oatacombs. Père Lachaise Picpus Cemetery, Bibliothèque.<br /> Rouge.<br /> Tom Orofton acts as my guide to the curious cafés and cabarets v1.-Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers, Musée Molière, Theatre<br /> of Montmartre.<br /> Française, Café Americaine.<br /> III.-St. Eustache, Musée des Archives, Musée Carnavalet, Place VIII. -Bois, Jardin d&#039;Acclimatation, Arc de Triompho, &amp;c.<br /> des Vosges, and Bistoric Houses.<br /> IX.-Café Procope, Conservatoire de Montmartre.<br /> IV.-The Boulevards, Halle aux Vins, St. Etienne du Mont, X-Exhibition Buildings.<br /> Pantheon, Sorbonne.<br /> XI.-Ride round the Walls of Paris.<br /> V.-Conciergerie, Notre Dame, Hôtel Lambert, Hôtel de Ville, XII.- Jardin des Plantos, Vincennes, &amp;c., &amp;c., Versailles.<br /> and Famous Houses of the Quarter.<br /> Part II.—Guide. Appendix.<br /> Part III.—Plan of Exhibition.<br /> The Preface says: “In presenting this account of a • Pilgrimage to Paris,&#039; the aim of the author has been to provide entortaining<br /> reading for the journey, which shall leave an impression with the traveller of the sights, curious and historic, which he would most like to<br /> view. To further assist him in his pleasuring, a concise Guide Appendix has been added to the . Pilgrimage,&#039; enabling him to see at a glance<br /> the days, hopra, and regulations for visiting the various objects of interest. The general plan of the Exhibition of 1900 will likewise be found<br /> able to see both the Exhibition and the City at little cost of research for themselves, and without<br /> the fatigue of wading through voluminous guidebook information as to the various sights, &amp; procedure which frequently leads to &amp; neglect of<br /> many points of interest, and lack of acquaintance with those eccentric cafés and cabarets which are such a feature of Paris life.&quot;<br /> PUBLISHED BY<br /> HORACE COX, Bream&#039;s-buildings, London, E.C., and F. TENNANT PAIN,<br /> 30, Rue Taitbout, Paris.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. (#15) #################################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> iï<br /> TYPEWRITING.<br /> 69, SUTHERLAND AVENUE, LONDON, W.<br /> MISS RANSOM.<br /> MSS. Typed with Neatness and Accuracy at 1s. 3d. per 1000 Words. Scientific MSS. a Speciality<br /> Circulars Reproduced in large quantities at a cheap rate. 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STATISTICAL BOOK OF REFERENCE<br /> TYPEWRITING.<br /> For facts relating to the Clergy in England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland,<br /> and the Colonies; with a fuller Index relating to Parishes and<br /> Beference, Miss BEATRICE WHITBY.<br /> Benefices than any ever yet given to the public.<br /> MS. Typed at 1s. per 1000 words. CROCKFORD&#039;S CLERICAL DIRECTORY is more than a Directory: it con-<br /> Address Mrs. KAY, Crossmead, Exeter.<br /> tains concise Biographical details of all the ministers and dignitaries of<br /> the Church of England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, and the Colonies :<br /> also a List of the Parishes of each Diocese in England and Wales<br /> I N D E X I N G<br /> arranged in Rural Deaneries.<br /> By B.A. (Camb.). 6d. an Hour, or “by Piece.”<br /> Testimonials to efficiency. Or READERSHIP in British Museum. THIRTY-SECOND ISSUE.<br /> S. V. J., care of “Honiatts.” 298, Uxbridge-rd, W.<br /> HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.C.<br /> SECRETARIAL WORK.<br /> Demy 8vo., with Map and Illustrations, price 108. 6d.<br /> LADY DESIRES<br /> | CLERICAL DIRECTORY 1900.<br /> TEMPORARY ENGAGEMENTS.<br /> | AN AUSTRALIAN<br /> IN CHINA:<br /> Experienced Typist (owns machine).<br /> Also COPYING MS., DUPLICATING, &amp;c. References.<br /> MISS W. KEMPSON,<br /> ROATH HOUSE, CARDIFF.<br /> Crown 8vo., cloth boards, price Bs.<br /> Being the Narrative of a Quiet Journey Across<br /> China to British Burma.<br /> By G. E. MORRISON,<br /> M.B.C.M. Edin., F.R.G.S.<br /> HATHERSAGE:<br /> A Tale of North Derbyshire.<br /> CHARLES EDMUND HALL,<br /> &#039;<br /> BY<br /> Author of “An Ancient Ancestor,&quot; &amp;c.<br /> London : HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.O.<br /> Pocket Size, price 6d.; by post, 6fd.<br /> THE LAWS OF GOLF,<br /> As Adopted by the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of<br /> St. Andrews.<br /> Special Rules for Medal Play.<br /> Etiquette of Goll.<br /> Winners of the Goling Championship.<br /> Winners and Runners-up for the Amateur Championship. .<br /> London : HORACE Cox, Windsor Hous), Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.C.<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> &quot; Mr. Morrison is an Australian doctor who has achieved probably<br /> the most remarkable journey through the Flowery Land ever<br /> attempted by a Christian ... He was entirely unarmed and<br /> unaccompanied, save for the coolies who carried his baggage. Such<br /> a journey--three thousand miles in length-could not fail to present<br /> many curious customs and as many curious people. But it is owing<br /> entirely to Dr. Morrison&#039;s graphic manner of description, and his<br /> acutely keen observation, that his travels are such a reality to the<br /> reader. This portly volume is one of the most interesting books of<br /> travel of the many published this year. It is frank, original, and<br /> quite ungarnished by adventitious colouring.&quot;-St. James&#039;s Budget.<br /> ** One of the most interesting books of travel we remember to have<br /> read.&quot;--European Mail.<br /> &quot;A very lively book of travel. ... His account of the walk<br /> of 1500 miles from Chungking to Burma, over the remotest districts<br /> of Western China, is full of interest.&quot;- The Times.<br /> &quot; Dr. Morrison writes crisply, sensibly, humorously, and with an<br /> engaging frankness. ... There is not a page he has written that<br /> is not worth the perusal of the student of China and the Chinese.&quot;-<br /> The Scotsman<br /> &quot;By far the most interesting and entertaining narrative of travel<br /> in the Flowery Land that has appeared for several years.&quot;-The<br /> World.<br /> London : HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Broam&#039;s-buildings, E.C<br /> B2<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. (#16) #################################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> The Society of Authors (Incorporated).<br /> PRESIDENT.<br /> GEORGE MEREDITH.<br /> COUNCIL<br /> Sir Edwin ARNOLD, K.C.I.E., C.S.I. | AUSTIN DOBson.<br /> SIR LEWIS MORRIS.<br /> J. M. BARRIE.<br /> A. CONAN DOYLE, M.D.<br /> HENRY NORMAN.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> A. W. DUBOURG.<br /> Miss E. A. ORMEROD.<br /> ROBERT BATEMAN.<br /> SIR MICHAEL FOSTER, K.C.B., F.R.S. GILBERT PARKER.<br /> F. E. BEDDARD, F.R.S.<br /> D. W. FRESHFIELD.<br /> J. C. PARKINSON.<br /> SIR HENRY BERGNE, K.C.M.G.<br /> RICHARD GARNETT, C.B., LL.D. A. W. PINERO.<br /> SIR WALTER BESANT.<br /> EDMUND GOSSE.<br /> THE RIGHT HON. THE LORD PIB.<br /> AUGUSTINE BIRRELL, M.P.<br /> H. RIDER HAGGARD.<br /> BRIGHT, F.R.S.<br /> THE REV. PROF. BONNEY, F.R.S. THOMAS HARDY.<br /> SIR FREDERICK POLLOCK, Bart., LL.D.<br /> THE RIGHT Hon. JAMES BRYCE, M.P. ANTHONY HOPI HAWKINS.<br /> WALTER HERRIES POLLOCK.<br /> THE RIGHT HON. THE LORD BURGH JEROME K. JEROME.<br /> E. Rose.<br /> CLERE.<br /> J. SCOTT KELTIE, LL.D.<br /> W. BAPTISTE SCOONES.<br /> HALL CAINE.<br /> RUDYARD KIPLING.<br /> Miss FLORA L. SHAW.<br /> EGERTON CASTLE, F.S.A.<br /> PROF. E. RAY LANKESTER, F.R.S. G. R. Sims.<br /> P. W. CLAYDEN.<br /> THE RIGHT Hon. W. E. H. LECKY, S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE.<br /> EDWARD CLODD.<br /> M.P.<br /> J. J. STEVENSON.<br /> W. MORRIS COLLES.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> FRANCIS STORR.<br /> THE HON. JOHN COLLIER.<br /> THE REV. W. J. LOFTIE, F.S.A. WILLIAM MOY THOMAS.<br /> SIR W. MARTIN CONWAY.<br /> Sir A. C. MACKENZIE, Mus.Doc. MRS. HUMPHRY WARD.<br /> F. MARION CRAWFORD.<br /> PROF. J. M. D. MEIKLEJOHN.<br /> Miss CHARLOTTE M. YONGI.<br /> THE RIGHT Hon. The LORD CURZON THE REV. C. H. MIDDLETON-WAKE. I<br /> OF KEDLESTON.<br /> Hon. Counsel – E. M. UNDERDOWN, Q.C.<br /> COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT.<br /> Chairman-A. HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> J. Scott KELTIE, LL.D.<br /> GILBERT PARKER.<br /> SIR WALTER BESANT.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> E. ROSE.<br /> EGERTON CASTLE, F.S.A.<br /> HENRY NORMAN.<br /> FRANCIS STORR.<br /> D. W. FRESHFIELD.<br /> SUB-COMMITTEES.<br /> ART.<br /> Hon. JOHN COLLIER (Chairman). I SIR W. MARTIN CONWAY.<br /> M. H. SPIELMANN<br /> COPYRIGHT.<br /> A. W. A BECKETT.<br /> A. HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> W. M. COLLEB.<br /> GILBERT PARKER.<br /> DRAMA.<br /> HENRY ARTHUR JONES (Chairman). H. BURNAND.<br /> A. W. PINERO.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> SYDNEY GRUNDY.<br /> EDWARD ROSB.<br /> Solicitore FIELD, ROScor, and Co., Lincoln&#039;s Inn Fields.<br /> G. HERBERT THRING, 4, Portugal-street.<br /> Secretary-G. HERBERT THRING.<br /> OFFICES : 4, PORTUGAL STREET, LINCOLN&#039;S INN FIELDS, W.C.<br /> A. P. WATT &amp; SON,<br /> LITERARY AGENTS,<br /> Formerly of 2, PATERNOSTER SQUARE,<br /> Have now removed to<br /> HASTINGS HOUSE, NORFOLK STREET, STRAND,<br /> LONDON, W.C.<br /> THE KNIGHTS and KINGS of CHESS. By the Rev. I THE ART of CHESS. By JAMES Mason. Price 58.<br /> 1 (A. MACDONNELL, B.A. Price 2s. 6d. not.<br /> | 1 not, by post 58. 4d<br /> London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s buildings, E.C. | London: HORACE Cox, Wirdsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.C.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 1 (#17) ###############################################<br /> <br /> The Author,<br /> (The Organ of the Incorporated Society of Authors. Monthly.)<br /> CONDUCTED BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> Vol. XI.-No. 1.]<br /> JUNE 1, 1900.<br /> [PRICE SIXPENCE.<br /> For the Opinions expressed in papers that are<br /> signed or initialled the Authors alone are<br /> responsible. None of the papers or para-<br /> graphs must be taken as expressing the<br /> collective opinions of the Committee unless<br /> they are officially signed by G. Herbert<br /> Thring, Sec.<br /> M<br /> HE Secretary of the Society begs to give notice that all<br /> 1 remittances are acknowledged by return of post, and<br /> requests that all members not receiving an answer to<br /> important communications within two days will write to him<br /> without delay. All remittances should be crossed Union<br /> Bank of London, Chancery-lane, or be sent by registered<br /> letter only.<br /> (6.) Not to bind yourself for future work to any publisher.<br /> As well bind yourself for the future to any one solicitor or<br /> doctor!<br /> III. THE ROYALTY SYSTEM.<br /> It is above all things necessary to know what the<br /> proposed royalty means to both sides. It is now possible<br /> for an author to ascertain approximately and very nearly<br /> the truth. From time to time the very important figures<br /> connected with royalties are published in The Author.<br /> Readers can also work out the figares themselves from the<br /> “ Cost of Production.”<br /> IV. A COMMISSION AGREEMENT.<br /> The main points are :-<br /> (1.) Be careful to obtain a fair cost of production.<br /> (2) Keep control of the advertisements.<br /> (3.) Keep control of the sale price of the book.<br /> GENERAL.<br /> All other forms of agreement are combinations of the four<br /> above mentioned.<br /> Such combinations are generally disastrous to the author.<br /> Never sign any agreement without competent advice from<br /> the Secretary of the Society.<br /> Stamp all agreements with the Inland Revenue stamp.<br /> Avoid agreements by letter if possible.<br /> The main points which the Society has always demanded<br /> from the outset are :<br /> (1.) That both sides shall know what an agreement<br /> means.<br /> (2.) The inspection of those account books which belong<br /> to the author. We are advised that this is a right, in the<br /> nature of a common law right, which cannot be denied or<br /> withheld.<br /> Communications and letters are invited by the Editor on<br /> all subjects connected with literature, but on no other sub-<br /> jects whatever. Articles which cannot be accepted are<br /> returned if stamps for the purpose accompany the MSS.<br /> GENERAL MEMORANDA.<br /> WARNINGS TO DRAMATIC AUTHORS.<br /> TT ERE are a few standing rules to be observed in an<br /> I agreement. There are four methods of dealing<br /> with literary property :-<br /> I. THAT OF SELLING IT OUTRIGHT.<br /> This is in some respects the most satisfactory, if a proper<br /> price can be obtained But the transaction should be<br /> managed by a competent agent, or with the advice of the<br /> Socretary of the Society.<br /> II. A PROFIT-SHARING AGREEMENT (a bad form of<br /> agreement).<br /> In this case the following rules should be attended to :<br /> : (1.) Not to sign any agreement in which the cost of pro.<br /> duction forms a part without the strictest investigation.<br /> (2.) Not to give the publisher the power of putting the<br /> profits into his own pocket by charging for advertisements<br /> in his own organs: or by charging exchange advertise.<br /> ments. Therefore keep control of the advertisements.<br /> (3.) Not to allow a special charge for “ office expenses,”<br /> unless the same allowance is made to the author.<br /> (4.) Not to give up American, Colonial, or Continental<br /> rights.<br /> (5.) Not to give up serial or translation rights.<br /> 1. N EVER sign an agreement without submitting it to<br /> W the Secretary of the Society of Authors or some<br /> competent legal authority.<br /> 2. It is well to be extremely careful in negotiating for<br /> the production of a play with anyone except an established<br /> manager.<br /> 3. There are three forms of dramatic contract for PLAYS<br /> IN THREE OR MORE ACTS :-<br /> (a.) SALE OUTRIGHT OF THE PERFORMING RIGHT.<br /> This is unsatisfactory. An author who enters<br /> into such a contract should stipulate in the con-<br /> tract for production of the piece by a certain date<br /> and for proper publication of his name on the<br /> play-bills.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 2 (#18) ###############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> Secretary will always be glad to have any agreements, new<br /> or old, for inspection and note. The information thus<br /> obtained may prove invaluable.<br /> 4. Before signing any agreement whatever, send the pro-<br /> posed document to the Society for examination.<br /> 5. Remember always that in belonging to the Society you<br /> are fighting the battlos of other writers, even if you are<br /> reaping no benefit to yourself, and that you are advancing<br /> the best interests of literature in promoting the indepen.<br /> dence of the writer.<br /> 6. The Committee have now arranged for the reception of<br /> members&#039; agreements and their preservation in a fireproof<br /> safe. The agreements will, of course, be regarded as con-<br /> fidential documents to be read only by the Secretary, who<br /> will keep the key of the safe. The Society now offers :-(1)<br /> To read and advise upon agreements and publishers. (2) To<br /> stamp agreements in readiness for &amp; possible action upon<br /> them. (3) To keep agreements. (4) To enforce payments<br /> due according to agreements.<br /> THE READING BRANCH.<br /> (6.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF PERCENTAGES<br /> on gross receipts. Percentages vary between<br /> 5 and 15 per cent. An author should obtain &amp;<br /> porcentage on the sliding scale of gross receipts<br /> in preference to the American system. Should<br /> obtain a sum in advance of percentages. A fixed<br /> date on or before which the play should be<br /> performed.<br /> (c.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF ROYALTIES (i.e.,<br /> fixed nightly fees). This method should be<br /> always avoided except in cases where the fees<br /> are likely to be small or difficult to collect. The<br /> other safeguards set out under heading (6.) apply<br /> also in this case.<br /> 4. PLAYS IN ONE ACT are often sold outright, but it is<br /> better to obtain a small nightly fee if possible, and a sum<br /> paid in advance of such fees in any event. It is extremely<br /> important that the amateur rights of one act plays shuuld<br /> be preserved.<br /> 5. Authors should remember that performing rights can<br /> be limited, and are usually limited by town, country, and<br /> time. This is most important.<br /> 6. Authors should not assign performing rights, but<br /> should grant a licei ce to perform. The legal distinction is<br /> of great importance.<br /> 7. Authors should remember that performing rights in a<br /> play are distinct from literary copyright. A manager<br /> holding the performing right or licence to perform cannot<br /> print the book of the words.<br /> 8. Never forget that American rights may be exceedingly<br /> valuable. They should never be included in English<br /> agreements without the author obtaining a substantial<br /> consideration.<br /> 9. Agreements for collaboration should be carefully<br /> drawn and executed before collaboration is commenced.<br /> 10. An author should remember that production of a play<br /> is highly speculative: that be runs a very great risk of<br /> delay and a breakdown in the fulfilment of his contract.<br /> He should therefore guard himself all the more carefully in<br /> the beginning.<br /> 11. An author must remember that the dramatic market<br /> is exceedingly limited, and that for a novice the first object<br /> is to obtain adequate publication.<br /> As these warnings must necessarily be incomplete on<br /> account of the wide range of the sabject of dramatic con-<br /> tracts, those authors desirous of further information are<br /> referred to the Secretary of the Society.<br /> EMBERS will greatly assist the Society in this<br /> branch of their work by informing young writers of<br /> its existence. Their MSS. can be read and treated<br /> as &amp; composition is treated by a coach. The Readers are<br /> writers of competence and experience. The fee is one<br /> guinea.<br /> NOTICES.<br /> M HE Editor of The Author begs to remind members of the<br /> Society that, although the paper is sent to them free<br /> of charge, the cost of producing it would be a very<br /> heavy charge on the resources of the Society if a great<br /> many members did not forward to the Secretary the modest<br /> 68. 6d. subscription for the year.<br /> Communications for The Author should be addressed to<br /> the Offices of the Society, 4, Portugal-street, Lincoln&#039;s-inn<br /> Fields, W.C., and should reach the Editor not later than the<br /> 21st of each month.<br /> All persons engaged in literary work of any kind,<br /> whether members of the Society or not, are invited to<br /> communicate to the Editor any points connected with their<br /> work which it would be advisable in the general interest to<br /> publish.<br /> The present location of the Authors&#039; Club is at 3, White.<br /> hall-court, Charing Cross. Address the Secretary for<br /> information, rules of admission, &amp;c.<br /> HOW TO USE THE SOCIETY,<br /> 1. LIVERY member has a right to ask for and to receive<br /> V advice upon his agreements, his choice of a pub.<br /> lisher, or any dispute arising in the conduct of his<br /> THE ANNUAL DINNER.<br /> business or the administration of his property. If the<br /> advice sought is such as can be given best by a solici. NHE dinner of the Society of Authors was<br /> tor, the member has a right to an opinion from the<br /> held in ihe King&#039;s Hall of the Holborn<br /> Society&#039;s solicitors. If the case is such that Counsel&#039;s<br /> opinion is desirable, the Committee will obtain for him<br /> Restaurant on Wednesday, May 16, and<br /> Counsel&#039;s opinion. All this without any cost to the member. passed off very successfully. Mr. Pinero made<br /> 2. Remember that questions connected with copyright an excellent chairman, and delighted those pre-<br /> and publisher&#039;s agreoments do not generally fall within the sent with an interesting and amusing speech<br /> experience of ordinary solicitors. Therefore, do not scruple<br /> Mr. Anthony Hope Hawkins responded for the<br /> to use the Society.<br /> 2. Send to the Office copies of past agreements and past Society. A full account of the evening will be<br /> accounts with the loan of the books represented. The inserted in the July number of The Author.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 3 (#19) ###############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> LITERARY PROPERTY.<br /> As to the item of £26 158., the following is the cost price :<br /> £ 8. d. £ 8. d.<br /> Sinding ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 20 8 9<br /> o 5 0<br /> Acts of Parliament ........ 0 1<br /> W<br /> .<br /> ..........<br /> I.-RUBINSTEIN v. WATERLOW BROTHERS AND<br /> LAYTON (LIMITED).<br /> TN this case Mr. J. S. Rubinstein claimed an<br /> account from the defendants. The questions<br /> in dispute raised points of interest and im-<br /> portance to authors and publisbers. The case was<br /> tried before Mr. Hemming, Q.C., on the 15th May.<br /> According to the plaintiff&#039;s case, he had<br /> written several law books and forms, which the<br /> defendants had published with large profit to<br /> themselves. In August, 1897, he saw them to<br /> ascertain their lowest terms for bringing out at<br /> his risk a book he then intended to write on the<br /> Land Transfer Act, 1897. On the 9th August<br /> they wrote :-“We are willing to publish your<br /> work on the following terms. We to debit you<br /> with printing, binding, advertising, &amp;c.; you to<br /> allow us 33 per cent. on the publication price of<br /> copies sold. As it is the practice now to allow<br /> 20 per cent. off the publication price to the<br /> general public, and 25 per cent. or 33} per cent.<br /> †<br /> to the trade, you will see we have, in accordance<br /> with your request, based our offer on the lowest<br /> possible terms.&quot; These terms were accepted.<br /> Owing to the delay in the issue of rules under the<br /> Act, the book was not published till December,<br /> 1808. when it was brought out at 58. In April.<br /> 1899, the defendants, at the plaintiff&#039;s request,<br /> furnished accounts charging £245 168. 4d. for<br /> printing, &amp;c., 1000 copies of the book, and<br /> £52 18s. 5d. for publishing the copies then sold.<br /> The accounts included items of £173 108. 6d. for<br /> composition, reading, proving, imposing, &amp;c., and<br /> £26 158. for binding. As the defendants refused<br /> to give specific details, the action was brought.<br /> In the course of the proceedings, the defendants<br /> were requested to produce books and documents,<br /> but they asserted that the time-sheets had been<br /> destroyed. They delivered under an order the<br /> following particulars, showing how the items of<br /> £173 1os. and £26 159. were made up :-<br /> As to the item of £173 108., the following is the cost price :<br /> Land Transfer Act, 1897, *<br /> £ 8. d. £ 8. d<br /> Ex. R. Binding Electro... 0 6 4<br /> Composing Demy 8vo. Book,<br /> pp. &amp; pp., Case ............ 82 0<br /> 0.T...............................<br /> 14/10/98, Alters, and pp. in<br /> Sheet pfe.......... 2 0 0<br /> 2011 98, 1000 Copies demy<br /> 8vo., 316 pp.<br /> Press .. ......... 8 10 0<br /> 750 Bound in whole cloth,<br /> Paper ........................ 1 2<br /> Postage paid on Books ...... 2 3 4<br /> 20 15 3<br /> Total charge against plaintiff ............... 26 15 3<br /> On the hearing of the case the defendants<br /> admitted they could not produce any book con.<br /> taining copies of the time sheets that had been<br /> destroyed. They gave the following figures as<br /> representing how the item £82 in their particulars<br /> were made up, although they could not verify<br /> them in detail:-<br /> £ 8. d.<br /> 12494 hours at 8 d. ........................... 44 4 II<br /> 126 hours overtime at 18. old. ............ 6 119<br /> 50 16 8<br /> Added to cover establishment oharges, &amp;c. 31 3 4<br /> 82 0 0<br /> The referee decided on the construction of the<br /> contract that the defendants were entitled, in<br /> addition to their publishing commission, to profit<br /> on the printing, binding, &amp;c., but he considered<br /> the sums claimed extravagant. To avoid the<br /> expense, of continuing the inquiry, the<br /> expense of continuing the inquiry the plaintiff<br /> accepted the figures given by the defendants as to<br /> the cost, and the parties accepted a suggestion of<br /> the referee to add 20 per cent. profit. On this<br /> basis the amount claimed by the defendants was<br /> reduced by £47 148.<br /> II.-MERIVALE v. HARVEY.<br /> In the Queen&#039;s Bench Division, May 21, Mr.<br /> Justice Grantham and a special jury heard the<br /> action, Merivale v. Harvey, which was brought to<br /> recover damages for breach of contract. There<br /> was a counter-claim for damages for libel. Sir<br /> E. Clarke, Q.C., and Mr. C. Mathews appeared<br /> for the plaintiff ; and Mr. Hammond Chambers,<br /> Q.C., and Mr. Spencer Bower for the defendant.<br /> Sir E. Clarke, in opening the case for Mr.<br /> Herman Merivale, said it was arranged that the<br /> defendant should send the plaintiff a Spanish<br /> book dealing with the incidents connected with<br /> the time of Don Juan, from which plaintiff was<br /> to write a play. The play was completed on<br /> June 11, and was much approved by the defen-<br /> dant. A long correspondence then took place<br /> between the parties regarding the cast, minor<br /> alterations, and such like, in the course of which<br /> difficulties arose. Eventually the plaintiff said<br /> that nothing was left for the protection of himself<br /> and work but to place himself in his lawyer&#039;s<br /> hands.<br /> Mr. Sydney Grundy, dramatic author, was the<br /> first witness called, and said he thought a fair<br /> 106 18<br /> Total charge against plaintiff ............<br /> 173 100<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 4 (#20) ###############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> sum to pay the plaintiff for his work was 1000 the directors of theatres that the society intends<br /> guineas. In cross-examination witness said he to continue to demand the dues as heretofore.<br /> had not read the play, but he assumed a run of at The managements which refuse the payment will<br /> least 100 nights, because Mr. Harvey accepted it, be placed under the ban of the society-that is to<br /> and he respected his intelligence.<br /> say, they will not receive permission to perform<br /> Mr. Arthur Wing Pinero, dramatic author, said any new plays.<br /> he considered that Mr. Merivale had contributed The Recht der Feder justly remarks,“ This<br /> most admirable work to the stage. He agreed shows what organisation and unity can effect.”<br /> with Mr. Grundy&#039;s evidence. In cross-examina-<br /> tion witness said he had not read the play, but<br /> from his knowledge of Mr. Merivale and his IV. — CONVENTION BETWEEN THE GERMAN<br /> work that he should have written an unsatis-<br /> EMPIRE AND AUSTRIA-HUNGARY.<br /> factory work was not the least probable.<br /> A convention has been entered into between the<br /> Mr. Chambers, on behalf of the defendant, above empires for the protection of literary,<br /> commented upon the fact that the plaintiff was artistic, and photographic works. The most<br /> not called, and proceeding said that so far from important articles of the convention are the<br /> the defendant behaving badly to the plaintiff, the following :-<br /> plaintiff bad behaved to the defendant in a way All indigenous (einheimisch) works produced<br /> entirely without reason or common sense. He in either empire are to enjoy the protection<br /> had also written letters of a libellous character, accorded to such works in the other: but with<br /> suggesting that the defendant had cheated him. the limitation that the protection accorded to<br /> That was an untrue and malicious statement, and foreign works is not to exceed that accorded to the<br /> plaintiff must have known that it was untrue at home productions.<br /> the time.<br /> A work is to be considered einheimisch which<br /> Mr. Martin Harvey was then called, and stated is protected by the interior legislation, either in<br /> that he was the defendant, and at present was consequence of its place of production, or of the<br /> manager of the Prince of Wales Theatre. He nationality of the author, or of his domicile.<br /> ask. d the plaintiff to adapt for him, last year. In all relations between the German Empire<br /> “Don Juan,&quot; from a Spanish play. He and his and the kingdoms and countries represented by<br /> wife made suggestions to the plaintiff, and they the Austrian Reichsrath, the protection accorded<br /> were well taken until he suggested that the by the convention depends solely upon compliance<br /> character of Inez should be made more human. with the conditions and formalities prescribed by<br /> It was suggested by the plaintiff that this part the legislation of the country of origin.<br /> should be entrusted to Mrs. Harvey. The cost of But in the case of the Hungarian Crown the<br /> producing the play would be something between protection depends not only upon compliance with<br /> £2000 and £3000. The time came when he the conditions and formalities of the country of<br /> instructed Mrs. Cuninghame Graham to write a origin, but also upon compliance with those<br /> play on the subject. The play written by her required by the legislation of the other country.<br /> ran only for three weeks and a few days. In his The exclusive right of translation into a<br /> judgment the plaintiff&#039;s play would not have run language in which no authorised and complete<br /> longer if produced. He paid Mrs. Graham £100, translation has appeared has a duration of three<br /> and was to have paid her another £100 if the years only from the date of publication of the<br /> piece ran 100 nights.<br /> original.<br /> Similar evidence was given by Mrs. Harvey, An authorised translation appearing within the<br /> wife of the defendant.<br /> prescribed limit is protected for five years.<br /> The learned judge having summed up, the The years are to be calculated exclusively of the<br /> jury found there was a contract and a breach by year of publication.<br /> the defendant. They also found there was no The convention is retrospective; but an excep-<br /> libel. In the result they gave a verdict for the tion is made for works already partly completed.<br /> plaintiff — damages £500. Judgment accord. The convention is to remain in force for ten<br /> ingly.—Daily Chronicle.<br /> The French text of the whole convention will<br /> be found in the Droit d&#039;Auteur for April. Our<br /> III.-ACTING RIGHTS IN DE Balzac.<br /> contemporary, Das Recht der Feder, remarks<br /> The powerful French “ Société des Gens des respecting it:<br /> Lettres,” in consideration of the approaching “The advantages which we gain in Austria are<br /> expiration of the protection of the acting rights not very great. Certain German books cannot be<br /> of De Balzac&#039;s dramatic works, has announced to reproduced there in German. Articles in periodi-<br /> years.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 5 (#21) ###############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> cals will be protected only when the probibition<br /> of reproduction is not neglected. Little security<br /> against translation is afforded by the very short<br /> period of protection. In Hungary the case is<br /> even worse. It is true that German books can<br /> be no longer there reproduced in German, and<br /> that the German periodicals of Hungary cannot<br /> reprint from the German periodicals, provided<br /> that the reproduction of articles, feuilletons, &amp;c.,<br /> is duly interdicted, but translation can hardly<br /> be prevented; and the works must be registered,<br /> which costs 5 florins, besides stamps. These con-<br /> ditions are consequences of the Hungarian law of<br /> 1844, and that law was simply a copy of our own<br /> law of the date. So we, after all, can hardly<br /> complain. It is thus that, in this world, castiga.<br /> tion for shortcomings is always exacted.”<br /> We may add that the terms of the convention<br /> between Great Britain and Austria-Hungary (see<br /> The Author for April, 1900, p. 233) seem to be<br /> distinctly more liberal than the terms of the con-<br /> vention between Austria-Hungary and Germany.<br /> V.-THE PATRONAGE OF A PREFACE.<br /> The readiness of certain publishers—even of<br /> some of justly high repute--to ignore or over-<br /> ride the wishes or feelings of authors has been<br /> exemplified in a recent experience of my own. I<br /> bring the matter before you and your readers,<br /> and publicly record my protest, not by way of<br /> airing a grievance or seeking support, but only<br /> from a sense of esprit de corps—to call attention<br /> to a certain infringement of an author&#039;s inalien-<br /> able rights, and to warn those who forget to safe-<br /> guard them from the beginning.<br /> A book of mine upon Mr. Ruskin was lately<br /> published by Messrs. Cassell and Co., who<br /> arranged with Messrs. Lippincott (more accu-<br /> rately known as the J. B. Lippincott Company),<br /> of Philadelphia, to issue it also in the United<br /> States. This was done. Through an oversight<br /> -following on a fire, I now learn-no copy of<br /> the work was forwarded to me; but I ascertained<br /> from a review notice sent to me by a New York<br /> paper that the book was prefaced by an intro-<br /> duction written by an American gentlenian of<br /> letters without my having been in any way con-<br /> sulted as to the propriety or reasonableness of<br /> such a proceeding. I wrote at once a letter of<br /> remonstrance to Messrs. Cassell—who were in<br /> ignorance of what had been done and were, of<br /> course, in no way responsible—and they forwarded<br /> that communication to the Lippincott Company.<br /> From this firm I have received the following<br /> courteous explanation :<br /> “In regard to the small note by Mr. Morris<br /> about which Messrs. Cassell have inquired in<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> your behalf, you will see that it occupies but<br /> three pages and is of simply general character,<br /> giving the date of Ruskin&#039;s death and a few<br /> remarks. We took such an interest in your work<br /> and its success here that we desired to bring it as<br /> closely as possible in touch with the American<br /> public. Mr. Morris is well known as a poet,<br /> writer on art, and director of one of our largest<br /> institutions, and we felt that the connection of<br /> his name with the book (but especially mentioned<br /> separately from your work and over his own<br /> signature) would be an advantage to it in placing<br /> your book before those interested in Ruskin<br /> here.&quot;<br /> I replied as follows:<br /> “In regard to the Introduction, I must<br /> warmly protest, upon principle, against your<br /> action in the matter. I very readily believe, from<br /> Mr. Morris&#039;s achievements and reputation, that<br /> that Introduction (which I have not yet seen)<br /> does honour to the book and, besides lending<br /> distinction to it, may help the sale. Had it been<br /> proposed to me that Mr. Morris should con-<br /> tribute this preface, I migbt perhaps have<br /> accepted the suggestion with pleasure ; if I had<br /> taken a contrary course, it would have been that<br /> I did not wish my work to receive any extraneous<br /> assistance, helpful and charming as Mr. Morris&#039;s<br /> doubtless is.<br /> “But that is not the point. What I complain<br /> of is this——that without any sort of reference to<br /> me you have endowed me with a sponsor. This<br /> act I consider to be wholly unjustifiable. You<br /> say you felt it would be an advantage, but it<br /> was necessary that I also should feel it to be so,<br /> and say as much, before you proceeded in the<br /> matter as you have. You have assumed a kind<br /> of proprietorship not only in the book, but in<br /> the author, which is altogether beyond the sphere<br /> of the publisher, and which must be resented by<br /> every writer who is subjected to it.<br /> “I entirely appreciate the courtesy of your<br /> letter and your desire to strengthen the book as<br /> much as possible; but I feel it incumbent upon<br /> me to put before you the real view of the case,<br /> and to take such steps to draw public attention to<br /> it as I think wise, in order to safeguard the<br /> interests of those authors whom publishers regard<br /> -perhaps rightly-as in need of strengthening.<br /> “For it must be clear that when a publisher<br /> agrees to issue a work, the understanding is that<br /> that work, as it proceeded from the author&#039;s pen<br /> and from no other, will be published in its<br /> entirety and in not more than its entirety-<br /> which, in logic, is absurd; and it must be equally<br /> manifest that any proposal for including a preface<br /> by another writer should be openly made and<br /> agreed to, and that the moment for raising any such<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 6 (#22) ###############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> question is at the time of the publisher&#039;s acqui. He seems, also, to have been a man of remark-<br /> sition of the work.”<br /> able endowments, philanthropical temperament,<br /> The question is, whether an author cannot and elevated sentiments. After his death the<br /> rest between his own covers without, so to say, fickle tide of public favour waned. Popular pre-<br /> having a strange—though, I am willing to admit, judice blackened his name, and represented him as<br /> a most exemplary and distinguished-bedfellow an alchemist and sorcerer who had obtained from<br /> forced upon him by the publisher, unasked. The the Evil One the secret of the mysterious philo-<br /> fact that the alien is ticketed with his own name, sopher&#039;s stone. A few fragments of the House<br /> does not alter the complexion of the proceeding with the big Gable—“ la Maison du grand<br /> Authors, especially abroad, often seek the support pignon”—which he built for himself in the rue<br /> of a distinguished writer to lend them counten. de Montmorency in 1407, are reported to be still<br /> ance in a preface. Alexandre Dumas, no doubt, in existence.<br /> profited by Jules Janin&#039;s preface to “ La Dame<br /> aux Camélias.&quot; Chaucer&#039;s Urry, Dr. Johnson&#039;s<br /> Two ANCIENT NOTABILITIES.<br /> Croker, Scott&#039;s Mr. Lang, and Byron&#039;s Mr. The name of Robert Estienne enjoys a less<br /> Henley are, of course, among the pains and ambiguous reputation. Born in 1503, he was<br /> pleasures of immortality. But to the mortal promoted to the office of royal publisher by<br /> author, while he lives. the right of veto, and Francis I., who took pleasure in occasionally<br /> assuredly of consultation, is sacred.<br /> visiting his protégé&#039;s workshops, and profiting by<br /> M. H. SPIELMANN. his erudite conversation. For Robert Estienne<br /> was one of the most learned men of his time. His<br /> Latin Bible is a typographical masterpiece, and<br /> the purity of his classical editions is notorious.<br /> PARIS NOTES.<br /> The latter fact is partly accounted for by his prac-<br /> tice of placing his corrected proof-sheets in the<br /> 5, rue Chomel, Paris. windows of his shop, in order that all scholars,<br /> NHE Great Exhibition is slowly progressing<br /> teachers, and savants who passed that way might<br /> I towards completion. Most interesting is the peruse them, and point out any slips or errors<br /> quaint collection of buildings entitled “Le that they perceived therein. The perfection of<br /> Vieux Paris,&quot; situated on the right bank of the<br /> the Estienne publications bears witness that the<br /> Seine just below the Pont de l&#039;Alma. The grim literati of the epoch were competent and obliging<br /> old Porte Saint-Michel forms the entry to the critics.<br /> Middle-age and Renaissance Quarter. To the left<br /> Théophraste Renaudotis undoubtedly the<br /> runs the ancient Vieilles-Ecoles-street, in which most amusing figure in this learned quartette.<br /> stands the Maison aux Piliers, the first town-hall Having obtained a doctor&#039;s degree at Montpellier,<br /> of Paris, precursor of the present stately Hôtel de he came to Paris to exercise his art at the sign of<br /> Ville. Here also are the houses of four person-<br /> the Golden Cock. Patients were apparently rare ;<br /> ages dear to the bibliophiles of all nations: to for in a comparatively short time he successively<br /> wit_Molière. Nicolas Flamel. Robert Estienne. established an address bureau, a registry office<br /> and Théophraste Renaudot. The first — the for persons seeking situations, a pawnshop, a<br /> Shakespeare of French literature—was born in chemistry laboratory, a gratuitous consultation<br /> 1622 in an old house belonging to the public office; and finally, the famous Gazette, which<br /> market-place, where his father, Master Poquelin, first appeared in manuscript in 1631, and was<br /> busily pursued the trade of upholsterer or carpet soon after duly printed on four pages as behoved<br /> weaver beneath the sign of the Apes&#039; Pavilion.<br /> the dignity of the first French periodical. The<br /> Larousse asserts that no other writer can be com fourth page was exclusively reserved for adver.<br /> pared with Molière as regards his fine portrayal tisements. Which detail proves that, despite his<br /> of character, his high originality of conception, failure in the profession, Renaudot was an excel-<br /> his sparkling verve, his humorous power, his lent feeler of the public pulse. This versatile<br /> natural gifts, and the good sense and Gallic ancestor of the modern French newspaper (and<br /> freshness of his style. « Every man who knows many other useful institutions) died in the year<br /> how to read,” said Sainte-Beuve, “is one reader 1653.<br /> more for Molière.&quot;<br /> THE GONCOURT ACADEMY.<br /> Nicolas Flamel was a species of French Para. The Goncourt Academy is flourishing like a<br /> celsus. He died in 1418, but the date of his green bay tree. Its tale of members has been<br /> birth is unknown. He appears to have enjoyed completed by the election of MM. Elémir<br /> no small celebrity as a writer, publisher, illumi. Bourges, Lucien Descaves, and Léon Daudet, the<br /> nator, and miniature painter of the first order. two first being elected unanimously. It had been<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 7 (#23) ###############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> asserted that M. J.-K. Huysmans&#039; adoption into in dramatic circles, asserting that the public had<br /> the Benedictine Order would necessitate this never expended so large a portion of its private<br /> eccentric writer&#039;s withdrawal from the ranks of income at the theatre as at the present moment.<br /> the new society. But M. Huysmans speedily The above statistics (with the list of new members<br /> negatived the idea by announcing his intention received) having been duly made known, and the<br /> of accepting the emoluments and taking part in routine congratulatory compliments exchanged,<br /> the agapes of the brotherhood. M. Emile Zola&#039;s M. Pierre Decourcelle-one of the dramatists<br /> irrevocable determination to persevere in his whose productions are most patronised abroad-<br /> candidature for a French Academy fauteuil proposed the raising of i per cent. of the tax<br /> prevented his accepting a seat at the fraternal levied on all French plays represented elsewhere<br /> board. For immortals and poets are among the than on French soil, the surplus thus obtained<br /> inadmissible items. The legal debates to deter- to be devoted to the Retired Pension Fund of the<br /> mine whether the Goncourt institution was “to society. The committee declared this generous<br /> be or not to be &quot; were most interesting. Accord. proposition to be antagonistic to the existing<br /> ing to the adverse party, Edmond de Goncourt&#039;s statutes of the society. Thereupon M. Decourcelle,<br /> intention was to create a small “cénacle,&quot; a little warmly seconded by an overwhelming majority,<br /> literary chapel in front of the great cathedral demanded a general meeting extraordinary. The<br /> whose radiant dome wounded and offended his too authorities declared the incident closed, and<br /> susceptible sight.<br /> ordered the opening of the ballot to decide the<br /> “If the French Academy be-as its detractors election of the new members of the committee.<br /> assert-merely the drawing-room of French litera- Forthwith ensued a general stampede of members<br /> ture,&quot; said Maître Chenu, “the Goncourt Insti- to draw up a petition for a general assembly.<br /> tution—with its dinners at twenty francs per head Sixty-five signatures-in lieu of the twenty<br /> - will never rank higher in the eyes of the world necessary to legalise the request-were appended<br /> than a literary table d&#039;hôte.&quot;<br /> to this document, which has recently been sub-<br /> To which Maître Poincaré replied, “ Our adver- mitted to the newly elected committee (presided<br /> sary gives us the choice between a pious and a over by M. Victorien Sardou) and by them referred<br /> gastronomic comparison. As a little chapel the to the judicial council of the society. The latter&#039;s<br /> Goncourt Academy will lead up to the great decision has not yet been made known.<br /> cathedral. As a table d&#039;hôte it will not keep its<br /> SHOULDER TO SHOULDER.<br /> guests long; when the dinner is finished each one<br /> will pass into the drawing-room-of the French<br /> The Dramatists and Musical Composers&#039;<br /> Academy.&quot;<br /> Society occupies a more prominent position than<br /> Maître Poincaré won the day. Wherefore the<br /> the Society of French Authors—the Société des<br /> first dinner partaken in company by the members<br /> Gens de Lettres. The relative importance and<br /> of the new academy was given in honour of the<br /> aim of the two institutions were clearly set forth,<br /> celebrated advocate who had so ably pleaded their<br /> a few months since, in.a speech delivered by M.<br /> cause in court, and whose eloquence had pre-<br /> Marcel Prévost, president of the French Authors&#039;<br /> vented the annulment of Edmond de Goncourt&#039;s<br /> Society, at the latter&#039;s annual banquet, at which the<br /> darling project. Maître Poincaré undertook the<br /> chair was taken by M. Victorien Sardou, presi.<br /> cause for love, not lucre. He pleaded none the<br /> dent of the sister society. “The two societies,”<br /> worse on that account.<br /> said M. Marcel Prévost,“ are united by a fraternal<br /> bond.” “The great family of men of letters have<br /> DRAMATISTS AND MUSICAL COMPOSERS. the right to be proud of these two sisters. They<br /> The annual general assembly of the Société des<br /> have both turned out well. We can say so boldly<br /> Auteurs et Compositeurs Dramatiques was rather<br /> to-day, since both have passed the critical age;<br /> à stormy affair. Its yearly report was drawn<br /> since one of these respectable ladies is sixty, and<br /> up by M. Paul Milliet, and contained the follow-<br /> the other eighty years of age. Yes, we are the<br /> ing satisfactory paragraph : “ In 1866-67, the<br /> ñ . &quot; In 1866.67 the<br /> younger;<br /> younger. The elder is the richer, the more<br /> annual theatrical receipts of Paris amounted to<br /> powerful of the two sisters; but, all the same,<br /> thirteen million francs : in 1876-77. to sixteen the younger is not to be pitied.&quot; *&quot; You, the<br /> million francs; in 1886-87, to nineteen million<br /> great ones of the theatre—the Sardous, Halévys,<br /> francs ; in 1896-97, to twenty-two million francs ;<br /> and Dumas—you have accomplished this deed of<br /> and in 1899-1900, they have attained a total<br /> a true and admirable socialism. You have said,<br /> of exactly twenty-two million, one hundred and<br /> • The little writers, the new comers, shall be paid<br /> fifty thousand, nine hundred and thirty-six<br /> as we are the day their plays are acted on the<br /> francs, eighteen centimes.” M. Milliet protested<br /> same stage. Their feebleness, their inexperience,<br /> vigorously against the pessimistic spirit current * This speech was addressed to M. Victorien Sardou.<br /> Domy&quot;<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 8 (#24) ###############################################<br /> <br /> · THE AUTHOR.<br /> shall no longer be exploited ; or else the great possesses his qualities. And it may be safely<br /> writers will put their ban on the stage.&#039; We—the said of any good writer that he is jealous of<br /> Société des Gens de Lettres-out of a mere himself and will always give his best at the<br /> nothing ... have founded a solid and time, even though the best at the time is not his<br /> flourishing institution. We have added a con- best at some other time. It is a simple contract.<br /> siderable sum to the income of the writer as long The publisher or the editor says “Give me your<br /> as he works ; and when he can no longer work, book-your treatise-your novel—for such and<br /> we have insured him a half security, at least, to such a consideration.” And the author signs the<br /> that dignified leisure in old age to which all those contract.<br /> are entitled who in their measure have striven to This kind of contract is made in every branch<br /> increase the patrimony of beauty which is their of literature. Where it is entered into by a<br /> country&#039;s heritage...Novelist and drama dramatist and a manager it must be as binding as<br /> tist, what are they but two sides of the same between publisher and author. The manager<br /> genius ?” M. Prévost concluded by saying that secures a play written by a dramatist of reputa-<br /> he drank to the good understanding of the two tion so well established that he is certain to get<br /> societies which represented the two phases of good work. When the play arrives, if the<br /> French genius ; to the fraternity of the book and manager finds that for some reason or other he<br /> the play; and to M. Victorien Sardou,“ homme would like to be off his bargain-a play, for<br /> de lettres” and prince of the French stage. instance, requires actors capable of representing<br /> DARRACOTTE SCOTT. it — he cannot do so unless the other party<br /> consents.<br /> -ou<br /> One or two of the papers speak of the hard-<br /> NOTES AND NEWS.<br /> ship of having a play which a manager cannot put<br /> on the stage, but he should have thought of that<br /> THE case of Merivale v. Harvey (p. 3) is<br /> possibility beforehand. Dramatists of repute do<br /> one which affects most vitally the whole of<br /> not write on the chance of being accepted: they take<br /> literary property. For literary property,<br /> commissions and enter into agreements. These<br /> which must not be confounded with literature,<br /> considerations seem elementary, but in the view of<br /> must be subjected to the same laws as govern<br /> such actions as Merivale v. Harvey being possible<br /> other property. If, for instance, an author signs<br /> it is surely necessary to point them out. In<br /> an iniquitous or unjust agreement, even if he were<br /> matters of principle the most elementary facts<br /> to give his publishers the rights which their<br /> must be continually repeated. We find that the<br /> Association claims, he must abide the conse-<br /> Ten Commandments are repeated every Sunday:<br /> quences. No one is so loud in his assertion of<br /> they are also put up for all the world to read.<br /> this simple axiom as the publisher where the<br /> Mr. Merivale deserves the thanks of the whole<br /> enforcement of an agreement is in his favour.<br /> literary community for taking his case into open<br /> On the other hand, an agreement entered into by<br /> court and establishing a precedent.<br /> a publisher with an author is equally binding<br /> even when it turns out not to be in his favour. The views of the American critic, quoted in<br /> another page, on English literature do not greatly<br /> differ from those most often expressed on this<br /> It is customary—it is indeed the rule—when an side. I have omitted a small part of the paper<br /> author has arrived at a certain stage of reputa- which speaks of living writers. Of Louis Steven.<br /> tion for him to accept engagements to write for son he speaks with words of very faint praise :<br /> magazines, journals, or for publishers. Agree-<br /> Stevenson has already taken his place as an entertaining<br /> ments are entered into by which the author novelist of the second or third class, and his singularly<br /> pledges himself to write a book on some subject, lovable personality is not now mistaken for literary genius<br /> an article, a novel, by a certain time for a certain by any great number of persons.<br /> consideration set forth in the agreement. The The time immediately after a writer&#039;s death is<br /> publisher makes the offer, with the full knowledge apt to be unwilling to concede his genius. It is<br /> that the author&#039;s reputation is such as to carry off like a reaction from admiration which in his<br /> his book with a profit to himself; the author, on lifetime could not acknowledge shortcomings<br /> the other hand, values his reputation too highly and unconsciously closed the eyes to defects.<br /> to send in scamped and unworthy work. He may There are, very possibly, persons who will agree<br /> be unequal—all writers are; the best work of a with this writer in his estimate of Stevenson. It<br /> good writer is often above his average work- remains, however, to be seen what their attitude<br /> still his average work bears his stamp and will be in ten years. Time, the only infallible<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 9 (#25) ###############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> critic, weeds out the lesser and the inferior work announcement was made: “ Dues five dollars yearly,<br /> and leaves a writer&#039;s best, however small in quan-<br /> strictly in advance, and must accompany all applications<br /> for membership. Absolutely no exception will be made to<br /> tity, for posterity. It certainly seems to many of<br /> this rule.&quot;<br /> Stevenson&#039;s old readers as if the selection made The assurance was made that the “membership fee<br /> by Time from Stevenson&#039;s works will be such as would be returned in full from any dissatisfied member.&quot;<br /> to place him above the “ second or third class.” Remittances, it was announced, must be made to no other<br /> person than Courtney, who signed himself “ Seorutary of<br /> the Association.&quot;<br /> The annual dinner of the Society of the 16th Women by the dozen applied to Courtney for employ.<br /> was a success in every way. The attendance was ment, and brought many manuscripts to him. He rejected<br /> a great deal larger than at any previous dinner-<br /> none of them if the applicants were prepared to pay the<br /> membership fee of five dollars. The most inexperienced<br /> there were nearly 350 present; the difficult task writers were assured that their work gave indications<br /> of seating the people seems to have been accom of great genius, and that hundreds of newspapers in<br /> plished without giving offence to any; there was the West were anxious to purchase the manuscripts at<br /> a cheerful sound of talk; and the speeches by<br /> high rates.<br /> the chairman, Mr. Pinero, by Mr. Anthony Hope<br /> Courtney was so successful that women who applied to<br /> him told their friends what an excellent business oppor.<br /> Hawkins, Mr. Bernard Shaw, Lord Monkswell,<br /> tunity they had discovered, and in that way caused<br /> and Mr. Henry Norman were admirable. There Courtney&#039;s roll of membership to be greatly increased. He<br /> was not the least sign of fatigue among an made promises to many of them, which some of the women<br /> audience always difficult to please during any of<br /> now claim he has not kept. He arranged to meet them at<br /> them.<br /> his desk on Satarday last, but, although many waited until<br /> late in the afternoon, he did not appear.<br /> On Monday they visited his office in crowds, but still<br /> Given a collection of 350 literary men and there was no sign of the &quot;secretary.&quot; Yesterday the<br /> women, including many of the best known, women descended upon his office again, and camped near<br /> given a chairman who is the first English drama-<br /> bis desk from early morning until nearly six o&#039;clock in the<br /> tist of the day, given such speakers as those<br /> evening, but Courtney failed to make his appearance. The<br /> members of the “ Association of New York Writers ”<br /> named above-would not this gathering be con-<br /> ove, would not this gathering be conlooked at one another mournfully all day, exchanging<br /> sidered remarkable in any other country? Yet experiences.<br /> was it considered in any way remarkable by the Persons from whom Courtney rented desk room told me<br /> Press ?<br /> that they knew nothing about the man, except that he had<br /> paid them for one month&#039;s rent. He gave thom no references,<br /> The following slip has been sent to the Editor<br /> nor did he say where he lived or where he had come from.<br /> He is described as tall, dark, of athletic build, and when<br /> as a warning to English writers :-<br /> last seen wore a dark moustache.<br /> More than fifty confiding young women with literary<br /> -on<br /> aspirations and trusting natures are anxiously looking for a<br /> man who says he is J. Courtney, and who until Saturday In justice to our own country I must remind<br /> last condacted what he styles “The Association of New<br /> our readers that Mr. Courtney has been antici.<br /> York Writers,&quot; in room 9 at No. 853, Broadway.<br /> Courtney made his appearance at the place mentioned,<br /> od pated by his brethren in the gentle art of<br /> which is ocoupied as a printing office, about three weeks<br /> wheedling on this side of the Atlantic. There<br /> ago, and rented desk room. Then he inserted an adver was the gentleman who advertised for MSS.,<br /> tisement in a number of newspapers stating that he had using the name of a well-known publisher.<br /> exceptional facilities for disposing of original manuscripts<br /> He bolted with his booty and, it is believed,<br /> to publications throaghont the West. To persons who<br /> answered the advertisements he gave a printed circular,<br /> carried his MSS. over to America, where<br /> hundreds of which he also sent throngh the mails to persons he proposed to sell them for his own profit.<br /> living out of town. This document stated that the “ asso. There was another practitioner who had a second<br /> ciation had larger facilities for the sale of manuscript and pair back in a court off Holborn for an office and<br /> placing of members in paying positions than any similar<br /> concern in the United States. It is the only one enabled<br /> also advertised for MSS., and, on the interven.<br /> to furnish immediate and permanent work to its members.<br /> tion of the Society, disappeared, leaving a room<br /> Membership is limited strictly to 100. New members full of papers. There was the gentleman-not<br /> admitted only through vacancies occurring by reason of old yet suppressed—who advertised for MSS. and,<br /> members accepting positions or otherwise retiring.”<br /> invariably, on receiving one, replied that his<br /> In setting forth the advantages of membership it was<br /> asserted that an opportunity was presented of &quot;procuring<br /> reader&#039;s report was so favourable that he was<br /> desirable positions on high class publications through our<br /> prepared to offer the following exceptional<br /> efforts; also the revision and sale of your manuscripts on a terms—the author to pay £60, £70, £80, or<br /> Jo per cent. basis by as ; work at home is also furnished any other fancy offer, and to receive 99 per<br /> members on request, paying from ten dollars to fifteen dollars cent. or 150 per cent. or anything else, of the pro-<br /> weekly, at copying, revising, correcting, &amp;c., and, if desired,<br /> ceeds. Mr. Courtney, of New York, is no doubt<br /> furnished at once on admission to membership.”<br /> Courtney&#039;s circular said nothing about the cost to a great man, but we have produced greater. The<br /> prospective members until the end, when the following agreements published in last month&#039;s Author<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 10 (#26) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 1Ο<br /> TIIE AUTHOR.<br /> show a master hand. London is still ahead of said to be imposed by the present law upon authors and<br /> New York in publishing enterprise.<br /> publishers which requires gratuitous presentation, are<br /> desirous of receiving evidence from the University of Oxford<br /> WALTER BESANT. as to the value of the right.<br /> The Commissioners will also be glad to receive informa-<br /> tion as to the average number of works of which copies are<br /> received annually, and whether such copies are as a rule<br /> presented voluntarily by the author or apon demand made<br /> THE COPYRIGHT ACT AND THE FIVE<br /> by the University.<br /> PRESENTATION COPIES.<br /> J. LEYBOURN GODDARD, Secretary.<br /> Similar Letters were sent to the Universities of<br /> Cambridge and Dublin, and to the Faculty of<br /> M HE Copyright Commission by its report of Advocates.<br /> 1878 recommended the retention of the<br /> The Oxford Reply.<br /> - present privilege of the British Museum<br /> Bodleian Library, July 4, 1876.<br /> Library (dating from 1845) to have sent to it,<br /> I have had the honour of bringing your communication<br /> whether demanded or not (the right of acquiring, of the 20th (sic) alt. before the curators of this library, and<br /> but on demand only, dating from 1814) a copy of am directed to inform you that it was resolved-<br /> every copyright book, but the abolition of the<br /> 1. That the librarian be requested to answer in writing<br /> the questions asked by the Commissioners, and to state on<br /> privilege of four other libraries (dating in the<br /> behalf of the curators that the University of Oxford desires<br /> case of Oxford, Cambridge, and Edinburgh from to retain its ancient privilege, not merely in the interests<br /> 1709, and in the case of Dublin from 1801) to of the University, but for the sake of the public.<br /> have sent to them within one month after demand 2. That the librarian be authorised to communicate with<br /> in writing made within twelve months of publica-<br /> the Commissioners farther as circumstances may require.<br /> Roverting, therefore, to your communication as above, I<br /> tion, a copy of every such book. “In making<br /> proceed to lay before you such answers as I may in reply to<br /> this recommendation&quot; (as to the abolition of the<br /> the queries of the commissioners therein contained :-<br /> privilege in the case of libraries other than that 1. Average number of works received annually.-Taking<br /> of the British Museum), observe the Commis an average of the last three years, we have received 4775<br /> sioners, “we have taken into consideration the<br /> works, comprised in 5301 volumes.<br /> 2. Books very rarely come direct from the authors. They<br /> facts that the bodies to whom the libraries<br /> are delivered by the publishers, the price of them being<br /> belong are possessed of considerable means, and<br /> reckoned, I believe, as a part of the expenge of publication.<br /> are well able to purchase any books which they 3. The greater part of the firms, and notably the most<br /> may require; and also that the repeal of the important ones, send either to our London agent in Great<br /> clause giving the privilege will not deprive the<br /> Russell-street (Mr. Eccles) or to Stationers&#039; Hall, without<br /> waiting for any demand. There are, however, a few firms<br /> libraries of any property already acquired, but<br /> from whom we have to demand everything, and even where<br /> merely of a right to obtain property hereafter to our claim is disregarded.<br /> be created.”<br /> 4. The books not sent are comparatively few, consisting<br /> Lord Monkswell&#039;s Bills of 1890 and of the chiefly of second editions without alterations, privately<br /> present Session, the first of which was directly printed books not for sale, classes of works which are not<br /> claimable under the Copyright Act.<br /> promoted by the Authors&#039; Society, disregarded<br /> H. 0. Coxe, Librarian.<br /> the recommendation of the Commissioners, and<br /> retained the privilege of all five libraries.<br /> The Cambridge Reply.<br /> The controversy having been again reopened<br /> by a letter of Mr. Murray to the Times and<br /> University Library, Cambridge,<br /> Jane 29, 1876.<br /> otherwise, it becomes desirable, in the interest of<br /> I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your<br /> all concerned, to go into the whole subject some letter of yesterday&#039;s date.<br /> what at length, and to begin with printing, from The long vacation has just commenced, and there will not<br /> the appendix to the report of the Commissioners,<br /> be a meeting of the Library Syndicate until the middle of<br /> the correspondence between the Commissioners on<br /> October, but I will take the earliest opportunity possible of<br /> laying your letter before the syndicate, and I am certain that<br /> the one hand, and the four library authorities of the University will be willing to supply the Commissioners<br /> Oxford, Cambridge, Edinburgh, and Dublin on with all the information which they may require.<br /> the other :-<br /> HENRY BRADSHAW.<br /> THE QUESTIONS OF THE COMMISSIONERS.<br /> October 26, 1876.<br /> Copyright Commission, 13, Delahay-street.<br /> With reference to your letter of June 28 last, which I<br /> June 28, 1876.<br /> acknowledged at the time, will you kindly let me have one<br /> The Royal Commissioners on Copyright having had before line referring me to the date of the appointment of the Com.<br /> them the subject of the present right of the University of mission, that I may find the terms in the Gazette ?<br /> Oxford, and the Universities of Cambridge and Dublin and I laid your letter before our authorities at the first meet-<br /> the Faculty of Advocates, to receive upon demand a copying of the term, and they are now considering the matter.<br /> of every book published in this country, and the hardship<br /> HENRY BRADSHAW.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 11 (#27) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 11<br /> The Dublin Reply.<br /> Library, July 5, 1876.<br /> Your letter was sent to the Queen&#039;s University, Dablin<br /> Castle, which accounts for my not having replied sooner. It<br /> would be very difficult to state the pecuniary value of our<br /> privilege under the Copyright Act. If I were to estimate it<br /> by the selling price of books, I am sure that £1500 annually<br /> would not compensate for our loss. But other considera-<br /> tions would make me regret very much a change in our<br /> present system.<br /> The namber of books received each year is at present<br /> between 3000 and 4000, and this is on the increase. The<br /> anthors seldom present a copy, bat the publishers are bound<br /> to do so on demand, and as a rule they comply with this<br /> very regularly. Any farther information I will be happy to<br /> impart.<br /> I may add that I laid your letters before the governing<br /> body of this University.<br /> J. A. MALET, D.D., Senior Fellow and Librarian.<br /> II. Étudier et comparer les lois qui régissent les biblio.<br /> thèques dans les divers pays.<br /> III. Échanges internationaux.<br /> IV. Rapports des bibliothèques aveo les administrations :<br /> Etat, municipalités, corporations, &amp;c. ; autonomie des<br /> bibliothègnes.<br /> V. De la meilleure organisation des bibliothèques popu.<br /> laires.<br /> VI. Recrutement da personnel des bibliothèques ; con.<br /> ditions exigées ou à exiger des candidats aux fonctions de<br /> bibliothécaires ; situation faite à ces fonctionnaires.<br /> DEUXIÈME DIVISION.<br /> Bâtiments, mobilier, aménagement des bibliothèques.<br /> QUESTIONS PROPOS ES.<br /> I. Étudier l&#039;aménagement des bibliothèques au moyen<br /> âge.<br /> II. Exposer les meilleurs moyens à employer pour installer<br /> les livres dans une bibliothèque nouvelle et pour améliorer<br /> l&#039;installation d&#039;une bibliothèque ancienne.<br /> III. Indiqaer les perfectionnements réalisés ou projetés<br /> dans les bibliothèques les plus récemment installées.<br /> IV. Indiquer particulièrement les précautions à prendre<br /> pour mettre les bibliothèquos à l&#039;abri de l&#039;incendie.<br /> The Edinburgh Reply<br /> Aug. 4, 1876.<br /> In reply to your letter of the 29th June, I am instructed<br /> by the Faculty of Advocates to forward to you the<br /> socompanying particulars as to value, &amp;c., of works<br /> received under the Copyright Act. The subject will be<br /> further considered by the Faculty after the court resames<br /> in October, and if necessary, further communication will<br /> be made.<br /> JAMES T. CLARK.<br /> 1. The annual money value of books, &amp;c., received under<br /> the Copyright Act, estimated at about £1500.<br /> 2. The number of books, exclusive of pamphlets and<br /> music, received annually, about 3500. The namber of<br /> pamphlets received in 1874 was 1551, and of pieces of<br /> music, 1337,<br /> 3. Nearly all the large publisbing firms in London send<br /> their works for the Advocates&#039; Library either to our London<br /> agent or to Stationers&#039; Hall without waiting for any demand.<br /> u<br /> The Scotch publishers send either direct to the library or<br /> to Stationers&#039; Hall, in both cases, as a rule, without any<br /> demand being made. The few books tbat are published in<br /> the provincial towns are generally demanded, and the demand<br /> invariably complied with, either by sending the work claimed<br /> or by a letter intimating that the work has already been<br /> forwarded to Stationers&#039; Hall for us.<br /> TROISIÈME DIVISION.<br /> Traitement des manuscrits, livres imprimés, cartes de<br /> géographie, estampes, photographies, &amp;c.-Acquisition de<br /> volumes — Enregistrement — Estampillage-Inventaires,<br /> catalogues et répertoires-Moyens de conservation-<br /> Restauration-Reliure.<br /> QUESTIONS PROPOSÉES.<br /> I. Indiquer les mesures qui ont été récemment reconnues<br /> comme les plus propres à dresser le catalogue d&#039;une biblio.<br /> thèque nouvelle ou à améliorer les catalogues d&#039;une biblio.<br /> thèque ancienne.<br /> II. Application à la bibliothéconomie des divers systèmes<br /> de classification bibliographique.<br /> III. Des catalogaes collectifs.<br /> IV. Utilisation des éléments de répertoire publiés à l&#039;état<br /> de fiches ou des bulletins imprimés joints par les éditeurs<br /> aux volames.<br /> V. Traitement à appliquer aux pièces volantes et aux<br /> documents parlementaires et administratifs qu&#039;il importo do<br /> conserver, mais qui ne peuvent être immédiatement cata-<br /> logués.<br /> VI. Avantages et inconvénients de la constitution des<br /> recueils factices, aussi bien de ceux qui ont été formés<br /> anciennement que de ceux qui sont à constituer.<br /> VII. De l&#039;atilité des récolements et des meilleurs moyens<br /> d&#039;y procéder.<br /> VIII. De l&#039;hygiène des livres. Par quels moyens peut-on<br /> le mieux les préserver des divers agents de destruction ?<br /> IX. Mesures à prendre pour la conservation et la restaura-<br /> tion des objets composant une bibliothèque : palimpsestes,<br /> papyrus, manuscrits, manuscrits à peintures, livres imprimés,<br /> cartes de géographie, estampes, &amp;c.<br /> CONGRESS OF LIBRARIANS.<br /> N International Congress of Librarians will<br /> be held in Paris on Aug. 20-23 next. The<br /> following is the official programme. The<br /> address of the secretary is M. Henry Martin,<br /> à le Bibliothèque d’Arsenal, Rue de Sully 1,<br /> Paris :-<br /> PREMIÈRE Division.<br /> Histoire, législation, organisation des bibliothèques<br /> publiques. Dépôt légal, copyright, &amp;c.<br /> QUESTIONS PROPOSÉES.<br /> I. Résumer les renseignements nouveaux qu&#039;on peut avoir<br /> sur l&#039;histoire des bibliothèques, depuis les origines jusqu&#039;aux<br /> temps modernes.<br /> QUATRIÈME DIVISION.<br /> Usage des livres à l&#039;intérieur et à l&#039;extérieur des<br /> bibliothèques.<br /> QUESTIONS PROPOSÉES.<br /> I. Sous quelles conditions le prêt des livres peut-il être<br /> autorisé dans les différentes catégories de bibliothèques ?<br /> I I. Comment doivent être réglées les communications des<br /> volumes imprimés et manuscrits d&#039;une bibliothèque à une<br /> autre ?<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 12 (#28) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 1 2<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> D<br /> G<br /> III. De la responsabilité des bibliothécaires pour la com great writers of prose, the contrast between the<br /> munication et le prêt des livres confiés à leur garde.<br /> living and the dead is seen to be almost as<br /> IV. Des dangers de transmission des maladies con-<br /> tagieuses par les livres des bibliothèques publiques et des<br /> pronounced as in the case of the poets. Within<br /> moyens d&#039;y remédier.<br /> twenty years Carlyle and Ruskin, by far the<br /> greatest prosateurs of our time, have ceased to<br /> appeal to us with the living voice. The per-<br /> suasive eloquence of Newman and Martineau<br /> AN AMERICAN CRITIC.<br /> has been hushed, and the plea for culture, voiced<br /> in such dulcet terms by Arnold and Pater,<br /> (The Dial, Chicago, May 1, 1900.)<br /> is no longer heard. All these men are now<br /> DURNING now to English literature-our among<br /> own literature upon the other side of the The dead, but sceptred sovereigns, who still rule<br /> ocean—the capital fact confronts us that<br /> Our spirits from their urns,<br /> in 1880 there were six great English poets among but to whose counsel we may no longer turn when<br /> the living, and that in 1900 there remains but one. new questions arise and call for new solutions.<br /> During the twenty years Tennyson and Browning, Of the four great men of science who have caught<br /> Rossetti and Morris and Arnold, have all passed the ear of the general public during the past<br /> away, leaving Mr. Swinburne in exalted isolation, twenty years, and whose teachings have wrought<br /> the only great poet of the nineteenth century so complete a change in the attitude of all think-<br /> whom we may hope will live to carry on into the ing men toward the claims of scientific culture,<br /> twentieth its glorious literary tradition. Our and the place of science in education, Mr. Herbert<br /> age of gold has to all seeming reached an end. Spencer alone remains to us. Darwin, Huxley,<br /> and Mr. Stedman, who a quarter of a century and Tyndall have died, but happily they lived<br /> ago recognised in the years of the Victorian long enough to witness the general acceptance of<br /> reign a distinct literary period, which even then the ideas for which they fought so good a fight,<br /> showed signs of drawing to a close, must himself and to be assured that the evolutionary principle<br /> be a little surprised at the completeness with had won for itself the suffrages of all whose judg-<br /> which his prediction has been borne out by the ment was worth having. The older school of<br /> event. In the place of our major poets we have historical writing, as represented by Green and<br /> now only minor ones, and the fact that we Froude, has given place to the school repre-<br /> have them in larger numbers than ever before sented by Dr. Gardiner and the Bishop of Oxford.<br /> offers us no consolation for the loss of the great The scholarship of these men is, no doubt, deeper<br /> departed. Aside from Mr. Swinburne, we are and more accurate than was that of their pre-<br /> compelled to point, when questioned concerning decessors, but their “ literature ” is sadly to seek<br /> onr living poets, to Mr. Aubrey De Vere, Mr. and their influence consequently restricted. The<br /> George Meredith, Mr. Theodore Watts-Dunton, general reader, with a taste for this sort of<br /> Mr. Robert Bridges, Mr. William Watson, Mr. writing, does not turn to the “ Select Charter,&quot;<br /> Stephen Phillips, Mr. W. B. Yeats, and Mr. but rather takes down from the shelf his well-<br /> Rudyard Kipling. We hold these men in worn “ Short History of the English People,&quot; and<br /> esteem, it is true, but however we may admire is not particularly concerned with the fact that<br /> the delicate art of Mr. Bridges, for example, or later research has invalidated some of its posi-<br /> the resonant virility of Mr. Kipling, our sense of tions. . . .<br /> proportion does not permit us to set these men When we contrast the period of the sixties and<br /> upon anything like the plane occupied by the seventies with the period of the eighties and nine.<br /> great poets who have died since 1880. And, with ties we may realise all the difference between a<br /> but few exceptions, our living poets seem to be period in which the creative imagination is at full<br /> no more than &quot;little sonnet-men,<br /> tide and a period in which the food of genius is<br /> Who fashion in a shrewd, mechanic way,<br /> fast ebbing away. In the later of the two periods<br /> Songs without souls that flicker for a day,<br /> English literature has rounded out the great work<br /> To vanish in irrevocable night.<br /> of the earlier; as the great writers bave died, only<br /> Prose fiction of some sort or other we have lesser ones have appeared to take their places ;<br /> always with us, and the names of Mr. Meredith and many of the younger men, recognising the<br /> and Mr. Hardy would lend distinction to any futility of any attempt to carry on the old tradi.<br /> period, but the great age of the Victorian nove- tion upon its old lines, have become mere experi.<br /> lists ended with the death of “George Eliot” menters in new moods and forms, hoping to hit<br /> in 1881. ... Since her death we have also upon some promising line of new literary endea-<br /> lost Lord Beaconsfield, Trollope, Black, Black- vour, but not as yet indicating with any precision<br /> more, and Stevenson. When we turn to the the direction which will be taken by the move-<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 13 (#29) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 13<br /> ment of the coming century. This restlessness,<br /> this confusion of ideals, and this uncertainty of<br /> aim, are the unmistakable marks of a transition<br /> period in literature. A remarkable age has<br /> rounded to its close, and it is impossible to deter-<br /> mine with any assurance whether the age to come<br /> will be merely critical and sterile, or whether it<br /> will give birth to some new creative impulse.<br /> When“ R. F. C.,&quot; who is writing in the inte-<br /> rests of education, goes un to say that “ books<br /> about boys confuse a boy&#039;s mind and cripple his<br /> power of distinguishing true from false; books<br /> written down to his level check the growth of his<br /> mind altogether&quot;-we are reminded of an observa-<br /> tion of Sir Walter Scott on this very issue. “I<br /> rather suspect,” he says in a footnote appended<br /> to the “Autobiography” in 1826, “ that children<br /> derive impulses of a powerful kind in hearing<br /> things which they cannot entirely comprehend ;<br /> and therefore, that to write down to children&#039;s<br /> understanding is a mistake: set them on the<br /> scent, and let them puzzle it out.”<br /> CONCERNING BOOKS FOR BOYS.<br /> BOOK AND PLAY TALK.<br /> A N article on this subject was published in<br /> the Guardian of May 2, in which the<br /> writer (“ R. F. C.”) remarks that “no one<br /> who has made acquaintance with the literature<br /> provided for boys- especially at Christmas-can<br /> fail to be struck with the extraordinary badness<br /> of it.” Even childhood is not spareu in that<br /> “ general rush for amusement which is one of<br /> the worst effects of material prosperity,&quot; but it is<br /> when the nursery is left behind that the mischief<br /> really begins to work. To keep him quiet, we<br /> pack the boy off with “ half-a-dozen gaily illus-<br /> trated wanton misrepresentations of facts of every<br /> sort,” and his purse is tempted by those who un<br /> scrupulously trade upon his simplicity with cheap<br /> waggeries and sham introductions to life. Then<br /> we“ proceed to wonder at the fatuity of his views<br /> of life&quot;:-<br /> The fact is that most books for boys-apart from the<br /> humorous books, which are all hopeless--are worthless for<br /> one or two reasons : they are either written “ down&quot; to the<br /> supposed level of a boy&#039;s mind, or they are written about<br /> imaginary boys. This second class is worthless, because<br /> books of this kind can only be made entertaining by mere<br /> extravagance. Real boys are infinitely entertaining to live<br /> with, infinitely dull to read about, and school life can only be<br /> made eventful enough for a story by stuffing it with<br /> absurdities. The only successful story of school life ever<br /> written, &quot;Tom Brown,” owes its success largely to the fact<br /> that it is not a story at all. Of the rest, some are written<br /> by those who know nothing of schools, and the result is an<br /> absolately fictitions and unreal picture ; others are written<br /> by schoolmasters, who draw upon their experience, and<br /> these are for some unknown reason far more fictitious and<br /> anreal than the former. Boys know all this perfectly well,<br /> of course, and read these books merely for the sake of the<br /> chapter-sure to come sooner or later-in which some<br /> unhappy pedagogue makes a fool of himself, if not accord.<br /> ing to the author&#039;s intention, yet surely according to the<br /> reader&#039;s understanding. Never give a boy books written<br /> about boys, unless they were not intended for boys to read.<br /> The knowledge of the combined demand of the boy who<br /> wants to pass an idle hour, and the immoral elder who<br /> wants to bribe him to do it, is too much for the average<br /> writer&#039;s sense of responsibility. Any trash will do, and he<br /> writes any trash ; and if there is a football match and a<br /> scholarship competition (with the hero accused of cheating)<br /> add &amp; score or two off &amp; master or two, the book will be<br /> praised and the author will-alas! the day--go home and<br /> write another just like it.<br /> [By an unfortunate accident the greater part of “ Book<br /> and Play Talk&quot; has been mislaid too late to allow of its<br /> being rewritten.!<br /> THE completion of the “ Dictionary of<br /> National Biography” will be celebrated at<br /> - the Mansion House, London, on June 29,<br /> when the proprietors, the editor, and a number of<br /> the contributors to the great work will be the<br /> guests of the Lord Mayor at luncheon.<br /> Mr. Richard Marsh&#039;s new novel, “ Ada Vern-<br /> ham, Actress,&quot; on which he has been engaged<br /> for over two years, will be ready for publication<br /> on June 1. It will be published by Mr. John<br /> Long.<br /> Mr. Arthur W. à Beckett, who has already<br /> filled the offices of Deputy-Chairman, Hon.<br /> Secretary, and Chairman of the London District<br /> of the Institute of Journalists, has been nomi-<br /> nated by the council of that body President for<br /> the year 1900-01. The institute holds its con-<br /> gress in London in September next. Sir Hugh<br /> Gilzean-Reid, Lord Glenesk, Sir Edward Law.<br /> son, Sir John Willox, Sir Edward Russell, Sir<br /> Wemyss Reid, and Sir James Henderson have<br /> served as presidents of the Institute of Jour-<br /> nalists since the date of its incorporation by<br /> Mr. Ferrar Fenton has in the Press a new<br /> version of his “ New Testament in Modern<br /> English,” which is an improved translation, with<br /> critical notes, to supersede his former popular<br /> issues of St. Paul&#039;s Epistles and the Gospels in<br /> current English. This new version will make,<br /> with the American edition, 14,000 copies of the<br /> New Testament and the 16.00oth of the Pauline<br /> Epistles of his versions. The work has been<br /> copyrighted in both England and the United<br /> States. Messrs. Horace Marshall and Son, of<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 14 (#30) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 14<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> Temple House, Temple Avenue, London, will be I have written some successful books, I will<br /> the British publishers, and Messrs. H. 0. not mention on what subjects, suffice to say they<br /> Houghton and Co., Cambridge, Mass., Boston, were not novels. After the last one had run into<br /> and New York, in America, for the translator. several editions my good friend and shepherd<br /> Those interested in opera, especially in the asked me if I would suggest a subject that had<br /> present season at Covent Garden, will read with not been written to death, and what my terms<br /> pleasure a special issue of the London Musical would be for a similar book.<br /> Courier, which contains photographs of all the<br /> I did mention a subject and terms, and as<br /> artists engaged. biographical sketches, stories of luckily I am not compelled by force of circum.<br /> the operas, and many other interesting features.<br /> stances to accept thankfully “the crumbs that<br /> fall from the rich man&#039;s table,” these terms were<br /> Mrs. Coulson Kernahan&#039;s new novel, “The<br /> based on lines so long and so ably laid down<br /> Avenging of Ruthanna,” on which she has been<br /> by The Author, and were distinctly fair as<br /> engaged for the last year, was published by Mr.<br /> between one business man and another. A few<br /> John Long at the end of May.<br /> days after I received a letter saying he could not<br /> Mr. Bernard Shaw&#039;s play, “ You Never Can possibly agree to the terms mentioned, and pro-<br /> Tell,” was so well received at the recent matinée posing others, but as I could perceive through<br /> performances that it may be produced again for them the “ cloven foot” suggesting the possi.<br /> a short run in the autumn.<br /> bility of inflated cost of production, corrections,<br /> advertising, cataloging, et hæc genus omnes, and<br /> as a “burnt child dreads the fire,” I declined<br /> them.<br /> CORRESPONDENCE.<br /> About eighteen months after, I was surprised<br /> to see a book advertised by this firm, on exactly<br /> 1.—THE READING BRANCH-A SUGGESTION.<br /> the subject suggested by me, from the pen of that<br /> well-known writer, Mr. L. Hack.<br /> M HE remarks made by Mr. Pinero at the<br /> Now, I do not blame Mr. Hack. who has bis<br /> Society&#039;s dinner the other night on the<br /> living to get, and is often a rather clever fellow;<br /> brotherly relations which should exist<br /> but in this case it required a particular and special<br /> between author and dramatist possessed a peculiar<br /> knowledge to write an acceptable book that would<br /> interest for many of us. It was significant that our<br /> sell, and this knowledge the writer did not<br /> leading playwright should have been asked and<br /> possess.<br /> should have consented to preside on that occasion,<br /> On looking it over, I found it was chiefly a<br /> and especially so when taken in conjunction with<br /> réchauffé of old material, extracts from journals,<br /> the fact that a dramatists&#039; committee has been<br /> with a top-dressing of more or less original matter,<br /> recently appointed by the Society. May I sug.<br /> the whole being almost useless for the readers for<br /> gest that a still further step be taken in this<br /> whom it was intended.<br /> direction? The reading of authors&#039; MSS., which<br /> The result was that when the book was pub-<br /> is such a useful branch of the Society&#039;s work,<br /> lished, it fell with a “sickening thud,” and very<br /> might be extended to include plays submitted by<br /> few copies were sold. The publisher will doubtless<br /> members, the fee charged to vary according to<br /> suffer a loss in this case, but most people will<br /> the number of acts.<br /> agree, I think, that it served him right under the<br /> At present, whilst the writers of books have<br /> circumstances.<br /> many ways of testing the merits of their works,<br /> In case some may think I tell this little tale<br /> the would-be playwright has no one to whom he<br /> out of pique, I can assure them it is not so, as my<br /> can turn for advice. A competent opinion on the<br /> literary vanity has been satiated long ago, and I<br /> faults of one&#039;s style and on one&#039;s aptitude (or<br /> otherwise) for playwriting would be a great hoon<br /> can readily get rid of all the work I have the time<br /> to perpetrate.<br /> to many who, whilst recognising fully the diffi-<br /> Moral.—Never communicate your ideas unless<br /> culties to which Mr. Pinero referred, are anxious<br /> to learn by criticism as well as practice.<br /> you are sure of your man. A. PENN-WYPER.<br /> - H. A. SPURR.<br /> III.—WELCOME.<br /> II.-Hoist WITH HIS Own PETARD.<br /> Most of us who read Mr. Robert H. Sherard&#039;s<br /> I cannot say I grieve very deeply when the mournful tribute to the memory of Ernest Dowson<br /> &quot;sharp” publisher is overtaken by a Nemesis of must have exclaimed : “If I had only known.”<br /> his own creating--but he occasionally is, as the The words certainly rose to my lips when I<br /> following incident will illustrate.<br /> learned that we must have been living within a<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 15 (#31) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 15<br /> few streets of the dead man at a time when he<br /> sorely needed help. To think that such help<br /> was withheld is bitter. It is just those evils for<br /> which no one in particular is responsible that<br /> makes life unendurable. At the present moment<br /> there may be other Ernest Dowsons living lonely<br /> and unrecognised in London. I should like to<br /> tell them that if they care to make acquaintance<br /> with strangers who would like to be friends they<br /> will always be welcome at our house. As I am a<br /> journalist and novelist it goes without saying we<br /> are not rich, but we love the things they love.<br /> Though we cannot offer substantial material aid<br /> we can at least extend a hearty and sympathetic<br /> hospitality. If any genuine literary workers,<br /> whether men or women, care to accept this very<br /> informal invitation for themselves, or wish to<br /> recommend others, I shall be glad to hear from<br /> them. Enclosing my name and address, but not<br /> for publication, and trusting you will be good<br /> enough to forward letters,<br /> Card Mille FailthE.<br /> BOOKS AND REVIEWS.<br /> (In these columns notes on books are given from reviews<br /> which carry weight, and are not, so far as can be learned,<br /> logrollers.)<br /> rhyme and grammar observed in the &#039;Canterbury Tales &quot;<br /> wherewith to test the authorship of any doubtfal poem.<br /> ...<br /> &quot;<br /> This is the new part of the book. For the rest it<br /> is a clear and convenient sommary of investigations made<br /> by the author and other Chancerian scholars, each as<br /> Professor Lounsbury.”<br /> A POPULAR HISTORY OF THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND, by<br /> the Right Rev. William Boyd Carpenter, the Lord Bishop<br /> of England (Murray, 68.), is an “admirable volame,” says<br /> tbe Daily Chronicle, and ought to have a very wide circu.<br /> lation.” “There is a human touch throughout, for which<br /> we commonly look in vain in ecclesiastical history. The<br /> Bishop recognises that the Church of each age is largely the<br /> child of the age.” “He has the true judicial spirit,” says.<br /> the Morning Post, and the book “ can do nothing but good<br /> wherever it is read.” “One would almost call it a history<br /> of Christianity in England.”<br /> DOCTRINE AND DOCTRINAL DISRUPTION, by W. H.<br /> Mallock (Black, 78. 6d. net), is described in the sub-title as<br /> &quot;an Examination of the Intellectual Position of the Church<br /> of England.” It is described by the Guardian as having<br /> been written in the interests of the Church of Rome ; &quot;Mr.<br /> Mallock&#039;s own position appears to us to be freely open to<br /> criticism of just the same character as that which he delights<br /> to pass on the position of Anglicans ; and when he comes<br /> to demolish their several authorities we cannot help feeling<br /> that sometimes his argument recoils on his own head.” The<br /> Expository Times says it is possible that Mr. Mallook “has.<br /> written a book that will make the ears of all that hear it<br /> tingle.” The Daily Chronicle pays a tribute to the author<br /> as “ a brilliant controversialist.<br /> FRANCE SINCE 1814, by Baron Pierre de Coubertin<br /> (Chapman, 68.), is “interesting reading,” says the Daily<br /> Telegraph, &quot;for anyone who can appreciate an unbiassed<br /> and level-headed criticism of French political history daring<br /> the past eighty-five years.” “To some of us,” says the<br /> Spectator, &quot; the solidarity of modern French political his-<br /> tory, which M. de Coubertin makes the chief point of bie<br /> book, seems so deeply hidden ander surface turmoil as to be<br /> almost an unreal thing. He goes far towards convincing<br /> us, however.” He unfolds the kaleidoscopic tale, says the<br /> Daily Chronicle, “in a brief compass, and with a pen that<br /> is always lucid and often brilliant.”<br /> A HISTORY OF SCOTLAND FROM THE ROMAN OCCUPA.<br /> TION, by Andrew Lang (Blackwood, Vol. I. 158.) is pro-<br /> nounced by Literature to be “the most readable” work on<br /> the subject, &quot;and, taking account of the use that has been<br /> made of recent specialist research, the most complete.”<br /> The Spectator, also, says that “Mr. Lang has not written<br /> a better. balanced book, or one more likely to be read,<br /> than this.” While it “ does not compete with Hill Burton&#039;s<br /> in point of size, it brings a great deal of fresh light to<br /> bear upon both the War of Independence and matters<br /> ecclesiastical.&#039;” The period covered by the first volume<br /> ends with the death of Cardinal Beaton; &quot;and throngh-<br /> out the period,” says the Guardian, “it will be emi.<br /> nently gratifying to the Scot to find what will appear<br /> to him a complete vindication of the anti-English atti-<br /> tude.” “Politically, the historian&#039;s sympathies are<br /> manifestly and not unjustly on the side of Beaton and the<br /> old Church.”<br /> HERBERT SPENCER : His LIFE AND WORK, by Hector<br /> Macpherson (Chapman, 58. net), “interesting and sug-<br /> gestive,” according to the Daily Telegraph, “is to be<br /> commended,&quot; says the Daily Chronicle, &quot;alike to those who<br /> know Mr. Spencer&#039;s works and to those who know them not.<br /> The one class will find refreshment to the memory in the<br /> clear, coherent, and accurate abstract which it supplies;<br /> THE LIFE AND TIMES OF SIR John CHARLES MOL-<br /> TENO, by P. A. Molteno (Smith, Elder and Co., 208.), intro<br /> duces the English reader to South Africa before the age of<br /> gold, for Sir John Molteno&#039;s political career ended in 1882.<br /> He was the first Prime Minister at the Cape. The work is,<br /> says the Daily News, “ &amp; gallant and successfal effort to<br /> preserve bis memory and vindicate his policy.” It is &quot;not<br /> a memoir, but a history.” “Those parts of the book which<br /> deal with the Confederation schemes are,” says the Spectator,<br /> “ of permanent interest.” “On the whole, Mr. Molteno<br /> writes with marked fairness.” Literature states that the<br /> work “ cannot be ignored by any careful student of South<br /> African history-though it would sadly mislead a student<br /> who studied nothing else.”<br /> LONDON TO LADYSMITH, VIA PRETORIA, by Winston<br /> Spencer Churchill (Longmans, 6s.), contains, says the Times,<br /> &quot;a very vivid and interesting diary of the war in Natal.”<br /> Mr. Churcbill&#039;s style, says the Daily News, &quot; is as lively as<br /> bis experiences have been.” “In all the correspondence<br /> that bas come from South Africa,&quot; says the Daily Chronicle,<br /> &quot; there is nothing better than bis story of the wrecking of<br /> the armoured train, the journey of its captured crew to the<br /> Transvaal, the life of the prisoners at Pretoria, and the<br /> writer&#039;s escape.”<br /> THE CHAUCER CANON, by the Rev. Professor W. Walter<br /> Skeat (Clarendon Press, 38. 6d. net), &quot;distinguisbes clearly,&quot;<br /> gays Literature, “between the genuine works of the poet<br /> and those which were wrongly attributed to him by early<br /> editors, such as Thynne, Speght, and Stowe in the sixteenth<br /> century. External evidence is generally enough to disprove<br /> their genuineness, but in cases where this is insufficient,<br /> with Professor Skeat&#039;s help, we may take the rules of<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 16 (#32) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 16<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> pioneer in the literature of Provence. “And we can testify<br /> from our examination of his work (As well as from the<br /> verdict of a highly competent Provençal scholar), that<br /> Professor Smith has gone with great thoroughness into his<br /> task.” The book is &quot;well worth reading, if only as a<br /> bistorical gaide to one of the most interesting regions in<br /> Europe.” The book is elegantly illustrated, says the Daily<br /> Chronicle, and “there is nothing about the troubadours that<br /> Professor Jastin Smith does not know.”<br /> HURRAH FOR THE LIFE OF A SAILOR (Blackwood, 128. 6d.)<br /> is by Vice-Admiral Sir William Kennedy, who relates his<br /> experiences in the Royal Navy. Reviewing it under the<br /> title “ Yaros,&quot; Literature states that the book will be<br /> popular with boys as well as grown-up people, and should<br /> give a stimulus to recruiting for the Navy.” The Daily<br /> Chronicle, says it is “bright with humour, and gay wisdom<br /> is found on every page.&#039;<br /> THE DISENCHANTMENT OF NURSE DOROTHY (Skeffing-<br /> tou). The Scotsman says that “the story is interesting,<br /> readable, and instructive.&quot; Tbe Hospital says that the<br /> author&quot; has evidently a considerable personal acquaint-<br /> ance with hospital life, and some of her sketches of<br /> character are admirably done.&quot; The Nursing Record thinks<br /> that the author is “evidently acquainted with her subject,<br /> and possesses considerable literary ability.” Her book is<br /> called &quot; distinctly readable.&quot; .<br /> OBITUARY.<br /> the other class will find it an excellent introduction to the<br /> dozen volumes in which the Doctrine of Evolution is<br /> defined and explained, or even to Mr. Howard Collins&#039;s<br /> epitome of that doctrine.”<br /> THE SECOND LADY DELCOMBE, by Mrs. Arthur Kennard<br /> (Hutchinson, 6s.), appears to the Spectator to be &quot; a good,<br /> if not exactly brilliant, specimen of the modern novel of<br /> society.” “It deserves to be, as it doubtless is,&quot; says the<br /> Daily News, “one of the successes of the publishing season.<br /> It is a pleasant romance-running, it is true, on more or less<br /> hackneyed lines—yet refreshingly unusual in its types and<br /> conditions. The loveless mariage de convenance, ending,<br /> not in disaster, bat, owing to the nobility of soul of the wife<br /> and the uprightness of the husband, in real love : this is the<br /> main theme of the book, but it is pleasantly diversified by<br /> character-study and incident.&quot; The figure of the American<br /> heiress, says the Daily Telegraph,&quot; is as convincing as it is<br /> attraclive and pathetic. This particular cbaracter is, in<br /> fact, as good in its way as anything that has appeared<br /> recently in the realms of novel-writing.&quot; &quot;The characters<br /> are real,&quot; says the Daily Chronicle, “and the dialogue always<br /> easy and natural.”<br /> THE WEST END, by Percy Wbite (Sands, 68.), is a<br /> novel dealing with the ways and works of “smart” men<br /> and women. The principal obaracter is a millionaire<br /> maker of jam, who determines upon the conquest of<br /> society. The Daily Chronicle speaks of the book as<br /> “ in the main a criticism of society, wherein we have<br /> Mr. Percy White&#039;s genuine gifts of observation, pene-<br /> trating, but not entirely unsympathetic, and his satirical<br /> reflection, trenchant, but not all unkindly.” The Spectator<br /> calls it a “clever poyel,” and Literature says &quot;it deserves<br /> a high rank when compared with the average novel of<br /> the day.&quot;<br /> NELL GWYN, COMEDIAN, by F. Frankfort Moore<br /> (Pearson, 6s.), a novel of which the vivacious orange girl is<br /> heroine, is described by the Spectator as &quot;a brisk and<br /> entertaining, though superficial, sketch of life and manners<br /> at the Court of the Restoration.” “ The most attractive and<br /> best-done portrait-sketoh in the volume,” says the Daily<br /> Chronicle, “is that of the Duchess of Marlborough while yet<br /> she was Miss Sarah Jennings.&quot;<br /> THE BATH COMEDY, by Agnes and Egerton Castle (Mac.<br /> millan, 6s.), is described by the Spectator as “a very lively<br /> and entertaining comedy.&quot; Literature says it is as “ viva-<br /> cions a story as anyone could wish to read.” The scene is<br /> laid in mid-eighteenth-century Bath, the “modish period of<br /> powder and patches.” “ The plot develops,&quot; says the Spec-<br /> tator, “oat of the stratagem resorted to by Mrs. Kitty<br /> Bellairs, a sprightly widow, to effect a reconciliation between<br /> Sir Jasper Standish and his too-adoring wife, a bride of<br /> three months.” “Altogether this is a very lively and enter-<br /> taining comedy of the artificial yet artistic sort.” “ It is a<br /> sanny book,&quot; says the Literary World, “ daintily written,<br /> constructed with the artifice that the comedy of manners<br /> requires.&quot;<br /> FROM VELDT CAMP FIREB, by H. A. Bryden (Horst and<br /> Blackett, 38. 6d.), consists of “excellent stories,” says the<br /> Daily Telegraph, &quot; wbich cannot fail to make an impression<br /> at the present moment when the interest of everyone is<br /> centred upon tbat part of the world. Mr. Bryden knows<br /> South Africa and its inhabitants thorongbly well, and on<br /> the whole his opinion of the Transvaal Boer would not<br /> appear to be an unfavourable one.&quot;<br /> THE TROUBADOURS AT HOME, by Justin H. Smith<br /> (Putnam, 258. net), leads the Spectator to say that, while<br /> the subject has been much studied by Germans and French,<br /> for the Anglo-Saxon world the author is something of a<br /> M HE death-roll of the month includes Pro-<br /> I fessor STANLEY LEATHES, the eminent<br /> - Semitic scholar, who died at Much Hadham,<br /> aged seventy; Dr. CoWIE, Dean of Exeter, at<br /> the age of eighty-four; General Pitt-RIVERS,<br /> anthropologist and antiquary; and Miss Chris<br /> HAMMOND, whose book illustrations in black and<br /> white were well known.<br /> 66TH<br /> AUTHOR.”<br /> SCALE FOR ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> Front Page ... ... .. ... ..<br /> ... ... €4 0 0<br /> Other Pages<br /> 00<br /> Half of a Page ...<br /> ... ... ... 1<br /> 100<br /> Quarter of a Page<br /> ... .0 150<br /> Eighth of &amp; Page<br /> ... ... 0 7 6<br /> Single Column Advertisements<br /> per inch 0 6 0<br /> Bills for Insertion<br /> per 2000 3 00<br /> Reductions made for a Series of Six or Twelve Insertions.<br /> All letters respecting Advertisements should be addressed to the<br /> ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER, The Author Otice, 4, Portugal-street,<br /> London, W.C.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 16 (#33) ##############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> TYPEWRITING COMPANY,<br /> OSWALD HOUSE, QUEEN VICTORIA ROAD, COVENTRY.<br /> LONG-EXPERIENCED READER FOR THE PRESS UNDERTAKES REVISION OF AUTHORS&#039; MSS.<br /> Authors&#039; MSS. 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It is the anecdotes and the personal details which give piquancy to the book.&quot;- Morning.<br /> London: HORACE COX, WINDSOR HOUSE, BREAM&#039;S BUILDINGS, E.C.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 16 (#35) ##############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> vii<br /> ONLY 500 COPIES PRINTED.<br /> Royal 8vo., with Maps and Plates, price ONE GUINEA.<br /> NEW BOOK ON CHESS.<br /> Price 28. 6. net.<br /> Man-Hunting in the Desert,“ SOCIAL<br /> CHESS.&quot;<br /> BY<br /> BEING A NARRATIVE OF THE<br /> PALMER SEARCH EXPEDITION,<br /> 1882, 1883,<br /> Conducted by Sir Charles Warren.<br /> BY<br /> Capt. ALFRED E. HAYNES<br /> (ROYAL ENGINEERS).<br /> WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> “The story of the vigorous efforts made, against terrible odds, to<br /> And the missing Professor and his companions is clearly and ably<br /> set forth. 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Crown 8vo., limp cloth,<br /> 28. 6d. net; postage, 3d. extra.<br /> THE<br /> &quot;A Story of the Siege of Chester, 1645.&quot;<br /> PRINCIPLES OF CHESS<br /> BY THE<br /> Rer. VINCENT J. LEATHERDALE, M.A.<br /> IN THEORY AND PRACTICE.<br /> BY<br /> London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.O.<br /> London: Horace Co<br /> JAMES MASON.<br /> CONTENTS. – 1. Elements of Chess. 2. General Principles.<br /> 3. Combination. 4. Exposition of Master Play Complete.<br /> In demy 8vo., price 128. net, by post 12s. Bd.<br /> Six Months in a Syrian Monastery.<br /> London : HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.C.<br /> Crown 8vo., limp cloth, price 28. 6d.<br /> OF<br /> Being the Record of a Visit to the Headquarters of the Syrian<br /> Church in Mesopotamia, with some account of the Yazidis, or Devil<br /> Worshippers of Mosul, and El Jilwah, their Sacred Book.<br /> By OSWALD H. 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With a Prefatory Note by the<br /> Right Reverend the Lord Bishop of Durham.<br /> A HANDBOOK<br /> PROCEDURE<br /> HOUSE of COMMONS,<br /> OF THE<br /> WITH<br /> SUGGESTIONS AND PRECEDENTS<br /> FOR THE USE OF<br /> PARLIAMENTARY DEBATING SOCIETIES,<br /> * The author of this handsome volume presents a detailed study of<br /> &amp; relic of history pursued off the track of general research;&#039; he has<br /> sought to give, and has succeeded in giving, &amp; picture of quiet life in<br /> . country much abused, and among &amp; people that command less than<br /> their share of ordinary interest.&#039; Westward the tide of Enipire takes<br /> its way,&#039; Bang &amp; prophetic divine of the olden days, and no less<br /> certainly, AB Mr. Parry points out, does the ebb of travel return<br /> towards the East...As volume descriptive of life and travel<br /> among &amp; distant people, his work is well worth reading, but for those<br /> persons who are more particularly concerned with the old Syrian<br /> Church, or in the solution of the problem indicated above, it is one of<br /> quite unique attraction. 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332https://historysoa.com/items/show/332The Author, Vol. 11 Issue 02 (July 1900)<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=49&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=%3Cem%3EThe+Author%3C%2Fem%3E%2C+Vol.+11+Issue+02+%28July+1900%29"><em>The Author</em>, Vol. 11 Issue 02 (July 1900)</a><a href="https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390" target="_blank" rel="noopener">https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=51&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=Publication">Publication</a>1900-07-02-The-Author-11-2<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=76&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=1900-07-02">1900-07-02</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=89&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=11">11</a>217–4019000702The Author.<br /> (The Organ of the Incorporated Society of Authors. 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CONAN DOYLE, M.D.<br /> HENRY NORMAN.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> A. W. DUBOURG.<br /> Miss E. A. ORMEROD.<br /> ROBERT BATEMAN.<br /> Sir MICHAEL FOSTER, K.C.B., F.R.S. GILBERT PARKER.<br /> F. E. BEDDARD, F.R.S.<br /> D. W. FRESHFIELD.<br /> J. C. PARKINSON.<br /> SIR HENRY BERGNE, K.C.M.G.<br /> RICHARD GARNETT, C.B., LL.D. A. W. PINERO.<br /> SIR WALTER BESANT.<br /> EDMUND GOSSE.<br /> THE Right Hon. THE LORD PIR.<br /> AUGUSTINE BIRRELL, M.P.<br /> H. RIDER HAGGARD.<br /> BRIGHT, F.R.S.<br /> THE REV. PROF. BONNEY, F.R.S. THOMAS HARDY.<br /> Sir FREDERICK POLLOCK, Bart., LL.D.<br /> THE RIGHT HON. JAMES BRYCE, M.P. ANTHONY HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> WALTER HERRIES POLLOCK.<br /> THE RIGHT HON. THE LORD BURGH. JEROME K. JEROME.<br /> E. ROSE.<br /> CLERE.<br /> J. SCOTT KELTIE, LL.D.<br /> W. BAPTISTE SCOONES.<br /> HALL CAINE.<br /> RUDYARD KIPLING.<br /> Miss FLORA L. SHAW.<br /> EGERTON CASTLE, F.S.A.<br /> PROF. E. RAY LANKESTER, F.R.S. G. R. SIMS.<br /> P. W. CLAYDEN.<br /> THE RIGHT Hon. W. E. H. LECKY, S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE.<br /> EDWARD CLODD.<br /> M.P.<br /> J. J. STEVENSON.<br /> W. MORRIS COLLES.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> FRANCIS STORR.<br /> THE HON. JOHN COLLIER.<br /> THE REV. W. J. LOFTIE, F.S.A. WILLIAM MOY THOMAS.<br /> SIR W. MARTIN CONWAY.<br /> SIR A. C. MACKENZIE, Mus.Doc. MRS. HUMPHRY WARD.<br /> F. MARION CRAWFORD.<br /> PROF. J. M. D. MEIKLEJOHN.<br /> Miss CHARLOTTE M, YONGB.<br /> THE RIGHT Hon. THE LORD CURZON THE REV. C. H. MIDDLETON-WAKE.<br /> OF KEDLESTON.<br /> Hon. Counsel – E. M. UNDERDOWN, Q.C.<br /> COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT.<br /> Chairman-A. HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> J. SCOTT KELTIE, LL.D.<br /> GILBERT PARKER.<br /> SIR WALTER BESANT.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> E. Rose.<br /> EGERTON CASTLE, F.S.A.<br /> HENRY NORMAN.<br /> FRANCIS STORR.<br /> D. W. FRESHFIELD.<br /> &#039;SUB-COMMITTEES.<br /> ART.<br /> Hon. John COLLIER (Chairman). I SIR W. Martin Conway.<br /> M. H. SPIELMANN<br /> COPYRIGHT.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> A. HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> W. M. COLLES.<br /> GILBERT PARKER.<br /> DRAMA.<br /> HENRY ARTHUR JONES (Chairman). I F. C. BURNAND.<br /> A. W. PINERO.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> SYDNEY GRUNDY.<br /> EDWARD ROSE.<br /> Solinitore_ FIELD, ROSCOE, and Co., Lincoln&#039;s Inn Fields.<br /> G. HERBERT THRING, 4, Portugal-street.<br /> Secretary-G. HERBERT THRING.<br /> OFFICES : 4, PORTUGAL STREET, LINCOLN&#039;S INN FIELDS, W.C.<br /> A. P. WATT &amp; SON,<br /> LITERARY AGENTS,<br /> Formerly of 2, PATERNOSTER SQUARE,<br /> Have now removed to<br /> HASTINGS HOUSE, NORFOLK STREET, STRAND,<br /> LONDON, W.C.<br /> THE KNIGHTS and KINGS of CHESS. By the Rev. MHE ART of CHESS. By JAMES MASON. Price 58.<br /> GA. MACDONNELL, B.A. Price 28. 6d. net.<br /> net, by post 58. 4d<br /> London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.C. London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.C.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 17 (#39) ##############################################<br /> <br /> The Author.<br /> (The Organ of the Incorporated Society of Authors. Monthly.)<br /> CONDUCTED BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> Vol. XI.—No. 2.]<br /> JULY 2, 1900.<br /> [PRICE SIXPENCE.<br /> For the Opinions expressed in papers that are (6.) Not to bind yourself for future work to any publisher.<br /> signed or initialled the Authors alone are - As well bind yourself for the future to any one solicitor or<br /> doctor!<br /> responsible. None of the papers or para-<br /> graphs must be taken as expressing the<br /> III. THE ROYALTY SYSTEM.<br /> collective opinions of the Committee unless<br /> It is above all things necessary to know what the<br /> proposed royalty means to both sides. It is now possible<br /> they are officially signed by G. Herbert<br /> for an author to ascertain approximately and very nearly<br /> Thring, Sec.<br /> the truth. From time to time the very important figures<br /> connected with royalties are published in The Author.<br /> Readers can also work out the figures themselves from the<br /> “ Cost of Production.”<br /> M HE Secretary of the Society begs to give notice that all<br /> T remittances are acknowledged by return of post, and IV. A COMMISSION AGREEMENT.<br /> requests that all members not receiving an answer to The main points are :-<br /> important communications within two days will write to him (1.) Be careful to obtain a fair cost of production.<br /> without delay. All remittances should be crossed Union (2) Keep control of the advertisements.<br /> Bank of London, Chancery-lane, or be sent by registered (3.) Keep control of the sale price of the book.<br /> letter only.<br /> GENERAL.<br /> All other forms of agreement are combinations of the four<br /> Communications and letters are invited by the Editor on<br /> above mentioned.<br /> all subjects connected with literature, but on no other sub-<br /> Such combinations are generally disastrous to the author.<br /> jects whatever. Articles which cannot be accepted are<br /> Never sign any agreement without competent advice from<br /> returned if stamps for the purpose accompany the MSS.<br /> the Secretary of the Society.<br /> Stamp all agreements with the Inland Revenue stamp.<br /> Avoid agreements by letter if possible.<br /> The main points which the Society has always demanded<br /> GENERAL MEMORANDA.<br /> from the outset are :-<br /> (1.) That both sides shall know what an agreement<br /> means.<br /> UT ERE are a few standing rules to be observed in an<br /> (2.) The inspection of those account books which belong<br /> 1 agreement. There are four methods of dealing<br /> to the author. We are advised that this is a right, in the<br /> with literary property :-<br /> nature of a common law right, which cannot be denied or<br /> I. THAT OF SELLING IT OUTRIGHT.<br /> withheld.<br /> This is in some respects the most satisfactory, if a proper<br /> price can be obtained. But the transaction should be<br /> managed by a competent agent, or with the advice of the WARNINGS TO DRAMATIC AUTHORS.<br /> Secretary of the Society.<br /> II. A PROFIT-SHARING AGREEMENT (a bad form of 1. N EVER sign an agreement without submitting it to<br /> agreement).<br /> N the Secretary of the Society of Authors or some<br /> In this case the following rules should be attended to :<br /> competent legal authority.<br /> (1.) Not to sign any agreement in which the cost of pro.<br /> 2. It is well to be extremely careful in negotiating for<br /> duction forms a part without the strictest investigation.<br /> the production of a play with anyone except an established<br /> (2.) Not to give the publisher the power of putting the<br /> manager.<br /> profits into his own pocket by charging for advertisements 3. There are three forms of dramatic contract for PLAYS<br /> in his own organs : or by charging exchange advertise. IN THREE OR MORE ACTS :<br /> ments. Therefore keep control of the advertisements.<br /> (a.) SALE OUTRIGHT OF THE PERFORMING EIGHT.<br /> (3.) Not to allow a special charge for “ office expenses,&quot;<br /> This is unsatisfactory. An author who enters<br /> unless the same allowance is made to the author.&quot;<br /> into such a contract should stipulate in the con-<br /> (4.) Not to give up American, Colonial, or Continental<br /> tract for production of the piece by a certain date<br /> rights.<br /> and for proper publication of his name on the<br /> (5.) Not to give up serial or translation rights.<br /> play-bills.<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> D 2<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 18 (#40) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 18<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> Secretary will always be glad to have any agreements, now<br /> or old, for inspection and note. The information thus<br /> obtained may prove invaluable.<br /> 4. Before signing any agreement whatever, send the pro-<br /> posed document to the Society for examination.<br /> 5. Remember always that in belonging to the Society you<br /> are fighting the battles of other writers, even if you are<br /> reaping no benefit to yourself, and that you are advancing<br /> the best interests of literature in promoting the indepen.<br /> dence of the writer.<br /> 6. The Committee have now arranged for the reception of<br /> members&#039; agreements and their preservation in a fireproof<br /> safe. The agreements will, of course, be regarded as con-<br /> fidential documents to be read only by the Secretary, who<br /> will keep the key of the safe. The Society now offers :-(1)<br /> To read and advise apon agreements and publishers. (2) To<br /> stamp agreements in readiness for a possible action upon<br /> them. (3) To keep agreements. (4) To enforce payments<br /> due according to agreements.<br /> THE READING BRANCH.<br /> (6.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF PERCENTAGES<br /> on gross receipts. Percentages vary between<br /> 5 and 15 per cent. An author should obtain a<br /> percentage on the sliding scale of gross receipts<br /> in preference to the American system. Should<br /> obtain a sum in advance of percentages. A fixed<br /> date on or before which the play should be<br /> performed.<br /> (c.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF ROYALTIES (i.e.,<br /> fixed nightly fees). This method should be<br /> always avoided except in cases where the fees<br /> are likely to be small or difficult to collect. The<br /> other safeguards set out under heading (b.) apply<br /> also in this case.<br /> 4. PLAYS IN ONE ACT are often sold outright, but it is<br /> better to obtain a small nightly fee if possible, and a sum<br /> paid in advance of such fees in any event. It is extremely<br /> important that the amateur rights of one act plays should<br /> be reserved.<br /> 5. Authors should remember that performing rights can<br /> be limited, and are usually limited by town, country, and<br /> time. This is most important.<br /> 6. Authors should not assign performing rights, but<br /> should grant a licence to perform. The legal distinction is<br /> of great importance.<br /> 7. Authors should remember that performing rights in a<br /> play are distinct from literary copyright. A manager<br /> holding the performing right or licence to perform cannot<br /> print the book of the words.<br /> 8. Never forget that American rights may be exceedingly<br /> valuable. They should never be included in English<br /> agreements without the author obtaining a substantial<br /> consideration.<br /> 9. Agreements for collaboration should be carefully<br /> drawn and executed before collaboration is commenced.<br /> 10. An author should remember that production of a play<br /> is highly speculative: that he runs a very great risk of<br /> delay and a breakdown in the fulfilment of his contract.<br /> He should therefore guard himself all the more carefully in<br /> the beginning<br /> 11. An author must remember that the dramatic market<br /> is exceedingly limited, and that for a novice the first object<br /> is to obtain adequate publication<br /> As these warnings must necessarily be incomplete on<br /> account of the wide range of the sabject of dramatic con.<br /> tracts, those authors desirous of further information are<br /> referred to the Secretary of the Society.<br /> CEMBERS will greatly assist the Society in this<br /> branch of their work by informing young writers of<br /> its existence. Their MSS. can be read and treated<br /> as a composition is treated by a coach. The term MSS.<br /> includes not only works of fiction but poetry and dramatic<br /> works, and when it is possible, under special arrangement,<br /> technical and scientific works. The Readers are writers of<br /> competence and experience. The fee is one guinea.<br /> NOTICES.<br /> T HE Editor of The Author begs to remind members of the<br /> Society that, although the paper is sent to them free<br /> of charge, the cost of producing it would be a very<br /> heavy charge on the resources of the Society if a great<br /> many members did not forward to the Secretary the modest<br /> 68. 6d. subscription for the year.<br /> Communications for The Author should be addressed to<br /> the Offices of the Society, 4, Portugal-street, Lincoln&#039;s-inn<br /> Fields, W.C., and should reach the Editor not later than the<br /> 21st of each month.<br /> All persons engaged in literary work of any kind, whether<br /> members of the Society or not, are invited to communicate<br /> to the Editor any points connected with their work which<br /> it would be advisable in the general interest to publish.<br /> The present location of the Authors&#039; Club is at 3, White-<br /> hall-court, Charing Cross. Address the Secretary for<br /> information, rules of admission, &amp;c.<br /> HOW TO USE THE SOCIETY.<br /> 1. TA VERY member has a right to ask for and to receive<br /> advice upon his agreements, his choice of a pub.<br /> lisher, or any dispute arising in the conduct of his<br /> business or the administration of his property. If the<br /> advice sought is such as can be given best by a solici.<br /> tor, the member has a right to an opinion from the<br /> Society&#039;s solicitors. If the case is such that Counsel&#039;s<br /> opinion is desirable, the Committee will obtain for him<br /> Counsel&#039;s opinion. All this without any cost to the member.<br /> 2. Remember that questions connected with copyright<br /> and publisher&#039;s agreoments do not generally fall within the<br /> experience of ordinary solicitors. Therefore, do not scruple<br /> to ase the Society<br /> 3. Send to the Office copies of past agreements and past<br /> accounts with the loan of the books represented. The<br /> THE INCORPORATED SOCIETY OF AUTHORS.<br /> -SCHEME FOR PENSION FUND.<br /> 1. INHE fund is established for the purpose<br /> of providing pensions for authors in<br /> need of such assistance, and for no<br /> other purpose.<br /> 2. Contributions to the fund may be either by a<br /> single donation or by a donation spread over three<br /> or more years, or by an annual subscription.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 19 (#41) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 19<br /> 3. All donations and not less than two-thirds which such candidate is to be proposed, and the<br /> of the annual subscriptions (after deducting the nomination of each such candidate shall be sub-<br /> working expenses) shall be added to the capital scribed by at least three members of the Society.<br /> of the fund and invested. The remainder of the A list of the names of the candidates so nominated<br /> annual subscriptions with the income from invest. shall be sent to the members of the Society with<br /> ments shall be devoted to the payment of pensions the annual report of the managing committee, and<br /> or to the purchase of annuities to satisfy pensions those candidates obtaining the most votes at the<br /> already granted.<br /> general meeting shall be elected to serve on the<br /> 4. The granting of pensions shall be in the Pension Fund committee.<br /> discretion of a committee to be called the Pension 10. The secretary of the Society shall act as<br /> Fund Committee of the Incorporated Society of the secretary of the Pension Fund committee.<br /> Authors, and such committee shall consist of the 11. For the purpose of granting or refusing a<br /> chairman of the managing committee of the pension five members of the Pension Fund com-<br /> Society, and six other members of the Society, of mittee shall be a quorum, but for any other busi-<br /> whom three shall be elected by the managing ness three members shall be a quorum of such<br /> committee and three by the members of the committee.<br /> Society at the annual general meeting.<br /> 12. All receipts in respect of the Pension Fund<br /> 5. One of the members of the Pension Fund shall be forthwith paid into an account to be<br /> Committee elected by the managing committee of kept in the names of three trustees, who shall be<br /> the Society, and one of the members elected by members of the society and shall be called the<br /> the members of the Society shall retire at the Pension Fund trustees. The first Pension Fund<br /> annual general meeting in each year. As between trustees shall be nominated by the managing com-<br /> two or more members of the Pension Fund Com- mittee of the Society, and new trustees shall from<br /> mittee elected by the same body, the member who time to time be appointed with the approval of<br /> has been longest in office shall retire, and for this such managing committee.<br /> purpose the period of office of each member shall 13. All payments in respect of pensions or<br /> be computed from his last election. As between working expenses, and all investments of the<br /> two or more who have been in office an equal Pension Fund shall be made by the Pension<br /> length of time, the member to retire shall in Fund trustees with the approval of the Pension<br /> default of agreement between the members con- Fund committee. All cheques on the account of<br /> cerned be determined by ballot. A retiring the trustees shall be signed by two trustees and<br /> member of the committee shall be eligible for countersigned by the secretary, or in his absence<br /> re-election.<br /> by a member of the Pension Fund comunittee.<br /> 6. The Society at any general meeting at 14. The amount of any pension shall be not less<br /> which a member of the Pension Fund committee than £25 nor more than £100 per annum.<br /> retires as above-mentioned, shall fill up the 15. Membership of the Society of Authors<br /> vacancy by electing a member in his place, and shall not give any right to a pension, but pensions<br /> may fill up any other vacancy among members shall be granted to members of the Society only,<br /> appointed by the Society.<br /> and such members (if in other respects qualified<br /> 7. If at any general meeting of the Society at as hereby required) shall become eligible for pen-<br /> which the election of a member of the Pension sions as follows:-<br /> Fund committee ought to take place such (1) For pensions to be granted in the years<br /> member shall not be elected, the managing com-<br /> 1901 to 1905, members of the Society<br /> mittee may fill the vacancy by the election of a<br /> having become such not later than March 1,<br /> member of the Society not being a member of the<br /> 1901, and so continuing to the date of their<br /> managing committee.<br /> application.<br /> 8. Any casual vacancy occurring on the Pension<br /> For pensions to be granted in the years<br /> Fund committee may be filled by the managing<br /> 1906 to 1912, members of the Society<br /> committee of the Society, but any person so<br /> having become such not later than March 1,<br /> chosen to fill the place of a member appointed by<br /> 1902, and so continuing to the date of their<br /> the members of the Society shall hold office only<br /> application.<br /> until the next annual general meeting of the<br /> For jensions to be granted after the year<br /> Society.<br /> 1912, members of the Society who have<br /> 9. Any candidate for election to the Pension<br /> been such members for not less than ten<br /> Fund committee by the members of the society<br /> clear years before the date of their appli-<br /> (not being a retiring member of such committee)<br /> cation, and so that for this purpose such<br /> sball be nominated in writing to the secretary at<br /> ten years of membership need not be<br /> least three weeks prior to the general meeting at<br /> continuous.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 20 (#42) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 20<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> Provided that any person who is otherwise quali. Pension Fund committee may cancel or suspend<br /> fied for a pension, but has ceased to be a member his pension.<br /> of the Society before the date of his application, 22. The granting of a pension shall not impose<br /> may in the discretion of the managing committee any personal liability whatever on any member of<br /> of the Society be re-elected a member without the Society or of the managing committee or of<br /> further payment, and thereupon shall become the Pension Fund committee or on the trustees,<br /> eligible for a pension.<br /> but every pension shall be deemed to be payable<br /> · 16. No pension shall be granted to any person only out of the income available for that purposé.<br /> under the age of sixty years, so long as suitable 23. If at any time hereafter the Pension Fund<br /> candidates of the age of sixty years or upwards should reach an amount sufficient in the judg-<br /> shall present themselves. Provided that a pension ment of the Pension Fund committee to meet all<br /> may be granted to a person of less age if and claims reasonably likely to be made upon it in<br /> while he shall in the opinion of the Pension Fund future, and if such committee shall pass a resolu-<br /> committee be totally incapacitated for work&#039; by tion to that effect and the managing committee of<br /> reason of illness or accident.<br /> the Society shall concur in such resolution, then<br /> 17. In granting or refusing pensions the the Pension Fund committee may either (a)<br /> Pension Fund committee shall consider not only cease to receive any further subscriptions to the<br /> the necessities of the applicant, but also the fund unless and until additional needs arise, or<br /> merit of his work; and, other matters being (6) apply the whole or any part of the annual<br /> equal, long and continuous membership of the subscriptions (although in excess of one-third of<br /> Society shall be considered a recommendation, such subscriptions) to the payment of pensions or<br /> 18. The application for a pension need not be the purchase of annuities for pensioners or the<br /> made by the applicant personally, but may be increase of any pensions or annuities already<br /> presented on his behalf by any two members of the granted or purchased, but the powers conferred<br /> Society. Provided that any person whose name by this clause shall not be exercised unless the<br /> is so presented shall, if requested by the Pension amount of the fund for the time being be not<br /> Fund committee, signify in writing his willingness less than £20,000.<br /> to accept a pension if granted, and if he shall 2 4. The Pension Fund committee shall have<br /> refuse so to do, his application shall not be enter power to make and from time to time vary bye-<br /> tained.<br /> laws for regulating applications for pensions and<br /> 19. All applications for pensions shall be for otherwise carrying out the purposes of this<br /> deemed contidential, but the names of the scheme.<br /> recipients of pensions and the amounts granted 25. Any of the provisions of this scheme may<br /> shall be stated in The Author.<br /> from time to time be varied by a resolution of<br /> 20. Except as otherwise provided in rule 16, all the trustees and the Pension Fund committee<br /> pensions shall be tenable during the life of the sitting together, but no such variation shall<br /> pensioner or until he shall become a bankrupt or take effect unless and until the same shall be<br /> shall alienate, charge, or incumber his pension or confirmed by a resolution of the managing com-<br /> some part thereof, but the Pension Fund com- mittee of the Society. Provided always that the<br /> mittee may at any time in their absolute discretion Pension Fund shall at all times hereafter be<br /> discontinue any pension for either of the following administered by the committee, consisting of<br /> reasons:<br /> members of the Incorporated Society of Authors.<br /> (a) If the pensioner&#039;s conduct shall, in the Settled on behalf of the Incorporated Society<br /> opinion of such conimittee, be such as of Authors by George Cave, Lincoln&#039;s-inn, May 31,<br /> would disqualify him from membership of<br /> 1900, and finally approved by the managing com-<br /> the Society.<br /> mittee of the Society at the meeting of the<br /> (6) If such committee shall be satisfied that<br /> committee on Monday, June 18, 1900.<br /> the pensioner is in receipt of an indepen-<br /> G. HERBERT THRING, Secretary.<br /> dent income sufficient for his support.<br /> 21. Any pensioner may at any time be required<br /> by the Pension Fund committee to make a statu-<br /> tory declaration stating that he has not alienated,<br /> charged, or incumbered his pension or any part<br /> thereof, and also (if required) stating that he is<br /> not in receipt of any independent income or<br /> specifying the amount of such income, and in the<br /> event of any pensioner refusing or neglecting on<br /> request to make such statutory dcclaration, the<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 21 (#43) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 21<br /> LITERARY PROPERTY.<br /> rather thau at the lower percentages for the<br /> benefit of the author. This is business.<br /> I.-TRADE METHODS.<br /> Closely analogous to this case is the example<br /> TN these columns have been exposed month of the deferred royalty-a frequent method of<br /> after month the more flagrant tricks producing works of fiction. The difference, how-<br /> practised upon authors, chiefly by means of ever, is that in the latter case the agreement, to<br /> agreements the nature of which they do not the eye of the expert, is bad from the beginning.<br /> understand. Let us now consider how an agree- A publisher, through long experience, knows<br /> ment which seems fair may be rendered futile by the average sale. He knows the amount likely<br /> the methods of the publisher in handling the work to be taken on subscription of a book of this kind<br /> or in administering the author&#039;s property.<br /> brought out from his house.<br /> In many instances the publisher is only He assures the author that, owing to the risk<br /> anxious to turn over his money, making 15 or 20 of production, he cannot afford to pay a royalty<br /> per cent. on the transaction, and has no real on a number of copies, and accordingly gets x<br /> interest either in the property on which he is number of copies free. Owing to this fact, it is<br /> supposed to be conscientiously working or in the arranged to the author&#039;s satisfaction that a pro-<br /> desires of the public before whom he poses as a portionately higher royalty shall be paid on copies<br /> patron. It is perhaps not altogether bis fault, it sold above the fixed number. Alas! poor author,<br /> is his hereditary instinct. Curiously enough, he never gets his higher royalty ; the accounts<br /> this cause of anxiety is often disastrous to the come in, and he is disappointed. He does not<br /> author. .<br /> know the trade of infanticide, but the guilty<br /> An author undertakes the writing of a bio. party is sometimes discovered and his tricks<br /> graphy, and enters into an agreement with the divulged. The distribution of the type in the<br /> publisher to produce the book, subject to a certain first case shows the passive neglect of the infant<br /> royalty, the royalty to be raised after the sale of for want of proper care and nourishment; and in<br /> copies of the book.<br /> the second case the use of an active agent in its<br /> In making this kind of contract, the author, destruction. In the first example, the result is<br /> having full confidence in his agent, believes that brought about by bad judgment and carelessness;<br /> the book will be pushed for all it is worth, and in the second, by intentional bad faith.<br /> the business managed for his benefit. The T he next example is not one of frequent occur.<br /> publisher, however, before entering into the con rence, but is extremely interesting as the result-<br /> tract has made up his mind that the book will not namely, the turnover of the publisher&#039;s money<br /> sell above the number on which the smaller at a sound percentage, and the cessation of profits<br /> royalty is paid, and he bas also calculated that, to the author-is practically the same as in the<br /> selling up to that number, it will pay him a hand cases quoted above; the motive is different, and<br /> some return of 15 or 20 per cent on the capital it is not so much one of gain as of personal spite.<br /> expended.<br /> To obtain a satisfactory result, you must imagine,<br /> An edition is printed accordingly, but the on the one hand, an author whose head is swollen<br /> publisher&#039;s judgment is at fault. The edition to a size too large for his body; while, on the<br /> sells out within six months, and there is still a other side, you must have a publisher who is<br /> demand.<br /> rather anxious to obtain the work of the author,<br /> If the type is still standing it would barely pay as he kuows that the publication is a sound 20<br /> more than 5 or 10 per cent. to push the book to per cent. investment. After a considerable<br /> the sale of another 500 copies, taking into con amount of wrangling, in which the publisher&#039;s<br /> sideration the higher royalty and further adver- temper has been upset by the author&#039;s cupidity,<br /> tising. (Further advertising would be necessary, an agreement has been arrived at. The author<br /> as the book has been allowed to drop from the is to receive a sum down in advance of royalties.<br /> market for two or three weeks.)<br /> The author thinks the sum far too small, con-<br /> But the type is not standing. It has been sidering, in his opinion, the assured circulation of<br /> broken up, so that the infallibility of the pub. the book.<br /> lisher&#039;s judgment is necessarily confirmed, as it is The publisher, altogether put out, is glad to<br /> impossible for another edition to sell. He has get off with such a small advance, and is deter-<br /> made it impossible. It could not possibly pay him mined to show the author that, after all, the public<br /> to re-set the type and print, so that in spite of are not overwhelmed with a desire to read his<br /> mild remonstrances from the author the book deathless productions.<br /> dies, a victim of infanticide.<br /> Is it a paradox to kill a deathless production in<br /> The publisher proceeds to turn over his capital its infancy? Infanticide, at any rate, paradox or<br /> again at the higher percentage for his own benefit, not, supervenes. The book is produced, and<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 22 (#44) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 22<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> continues to sell until the sum advanced on complete his book on the same subject as the<br /> royalties is covered. By this time, too, the result of his life&#039;s work. His mind is at once<br /> publisher has earned his expected percentage on made up. He hurries to the office without<br /> his capital. At once the house is drawn and the delay, writes a letter to the Professor asking him<br /> infant&#039;s life is extinguished.<br /> if he may have the honour of publishing his<br /> The cause and effect can be clearly linked, as book.<br /> the number at which the sale stops is damning The unfortunate author falls into the trap, and<br /> evidence; but legal proof there is none. The in due course enters into a hard-and-fast agree-<br /> publisher in his letters is full of regret.<br /> ment, handing over to the publisher (according<br /> A desire to study the accounts closely will often to the equitable agreement drafted by their asso.<br /> produce a disastrous result, but a longing to see ciation) almost every right the author could<br /> the “Day Book” will infallibly bring about a possibly possess, and at the same time binds him-<br /> fatal ending.<br /> self not to abridge the work or produce any other<br /> The following example is also instructive. work which may interfere with the sale. The pub-<br /> The same lesson can be drawn from it as froin lisher takes care that no such clause should fetter<br /> all the others.<br /> his action, as that would be ruinous to its success.<br /> A publisher enters into a contract with a young The Professor goes to bed and thinks that he<br /> author for the publication of his first book on a has toiled for years, and thus at length obtained<br /> royalty basis, and in the agreement binds the the reward for his life&#039;s long labours. He wakes<br /> author for a second book on the same terms. in due course, but only to find his only child<br /> This is yery bad for the author, but he accepts, strangled at its birth. He weeps, and consults<br /> sometimes through ignorance, sometimes through the publisher, who informs him that for some<br /> nervousness, sometimes through indifference. unexplained reason the work has fallen flat, and<br /> The first book comes out, and has a remarkable will not sell.<br /> run for a first book. It certainly does not bring The Professor is unable, owing to the terms of<br /> the author much return financially, as he is only his agreement, however much he may desire it,<br /> being paid a small royalty after the sale of a fixed to publish elsewhere.<br /> number of copies, but it is a really profitable But the publisher&#039;s copyright book still sells<br /> investment for the publisher, as he sees a satis- briskly.<br /> factory return in the present and great possi. The commercial instinct is a wonderful pos-<br /> bilities in the future.<br /> session. The British Empire is founded on it.<br /> The second book is brought out in accordance<br /> G. H. T.<br /> with the agreement. The circulation is, however,<br /> small compared with that of the first book. The To the above remarks, based upon actual<br /> author is astonished and disappointed, but the experience, I append two cases, the first with the<br /> tradesman knows. The circulation is sufficiently naines.<br /> large to satisfy his mercantile spirit, and is kept In the year 1869-70, I, being then secretary of<br /> sufficiently small to enable him to gain a third the Palestine Exploration Fund, and therefore<br /> volume from the same pen on the same remune having my attention every day called to the<br /> rative terms, for “as the second book has gone subject, arranged with the late Professor Palmer<br /> so badly he with great regret is unable to make a to write a history of the city of Jerusalem from<br /> better offer.”<br /> the siege of Titus to modern times. He, for his<br /> The eyes of the expert, however, sees the share, contributed the history from Moslem<br /> inwardness of the mancuvre. The marks of the Historians : I, for my part, the history from the<br /> murderer&#039;s fingers are on the throat of the infant. Crusaders&#039; and Christian Chronicles. We devoted<br /> The last example is perhaps the saddest of all, much time and labour to the work: the thing<br /> as everyone knows the fondness of a parent for had never before been done: we hoped to produce<br /> the child of his old age, and the old Professor a standard book. We intrusted it to Bentley and<br /> who suffers is the victim of this cruel plot. Son on a half-profit system. An edition of a<br /> It happens in this wise. A publisher has an thousand copies was printed, and the book was<br /> excellent educational work on some special duly produced, making a very creditable appear-<br /> subject. He has bought the copyright for a ance. The edition was completely sold out; an<br /> small sum, and is pushing its sale to the utter account was rendered showing no profits; and we<br /> most; it is selling in larger numbers than then learned, to our mortification, that the type<br /> even B.&#039;s famous novel “Balderdash.” But had been distributed and no moulds had been<br /> he wakes up with the uncomfortable recollection made. I vainly urged upon the publishers the<br /> that at a dinner the night before he had heard production of a second edition. Many years<br /> Professor R— state that he was about to passed, I again pressed for the production of a<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 23 (#45) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 23<br /> new edition. By this time Professor Palmer was<br /> dead. The firm undertook to bring out a new<br /> edition at last, subject to the condition that I<br /> should guarantee 300 copies. I did so, and placed<br /> the copies myself to prevent any possibility of<br /> mistake. The book I afterwards, on the disap-<br /> pearance of the firm, transferred to Messrs.<br /> Chatto and Windus. It has gone through three<br /> editions, I believe, since its revival.<br /> The second instance is of a three-volume novel<br /> Some years ago the author signed an agreement<br /> by which he was to receive a very large royalty-.<br /> think about 98. a copy-after 350 copies had been<br /> sold. The worthy publisher printed 350 and then<br /> distributed the type. This case has been already<br /> mentioned in an early number of The Author.<br /> W. B.<br /> II.—THE COPYRIGHT ACT AND THE Five<br /> GRATIS COPIES.<br /> It will have been seen from the correspond-<br /> ence of 1876 between the Royal Commissioners<br /> on the one hand and the authorities of the<br /> four privileged libraries of Oxford, Cambridge,<br /> Edinburgh and Dublin on the other, which we<br /> printed in the June Author, that Cambridge left<br /> oft<br /> the questions of the Commissioners unanswered,<br /> that Oxford, though otherwise fully answering,<br /> was silent as to the value of the privilege, only<br /> stating the desire of the University to retain it,<br /> “not merely in the interests of the University,<br /> but for the sake of the public,” and that Edin.<br /> burgh and Dublin agreed in putting the value<br /> at not less than £1500 a year. It will now be<br /> desirable to state shortly the history and present<br /> effect of the statutory privileges of the five<br /> libraries entitled to gratis copies — the British<br /> Museum, so entitled absolutely, and the libraries<br /> of Oxford, Cambridge, Dublin, and Edinburgh,<br /> so entitled on written demand only, to be made<br /> within a limited time.<br /> The first Act, that of 1662, directed the printer<br /> of every book to send one copy to the Royal<br /> Library and one copy to each of the Vice-<br /> Chancellors of Oxford and Cambridge Univer-<br /> sities for the use of the public libraries there;<br /> the second, that of 1709, which first gave statu-<br /> tory copyright, directed nine copies to be delivered<br /> at Stationers&#039; Hall for the use of the Royal<br /> Library, the Oxford and Cambridge Libraries, the<br /> library of Sion College in London, the libraries<br /> of the four Scotch Universities (of St. Andrews,<br /> Glasgow, Aberdeen and Edinburgh), and “the<br /> library commonly called the library belonging to<br /> the Faculty of Advocates at Edinburgh respec-<br /> tively.” In 1801, the Legislative Union with<br /> Ireland having just been accomplished, an amend<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> ing Copyright Act directed the delivery of two<br /> additional copies for the use of the libraries of<br /> Trinity College and of the King&#039;s Inns, Dublin,<br /> making eleven gratis copies in all.<br /> In 1814 two great changes were made. The<br /> British Museum, which had been founded in<br /> pursuance of Sir Hans Sloane&#039;s will so far back<br /> as 1759, first became entitled to a gratis copy,<br /> taking the place of the Royal Library; and the<br /> requirement of a demand on the part of all the<br /> privileged libraries first made its appearance,<br /> without any distinction, as at present, between<br /> the British Museum and the other libraries. The<br /> extensiveness of the privilege caused great dis.<br /> satisfaction amongst publishers, and in 1818 a<br /> Select Committee of the House of Commons<br /> resolved :-<br /> That it is desirable that so much of the Copyright Act as<br /> requires the gratuitous delivery of every work should be<br /> repealed except in so far as relates to the British Museum,<br /> and that a fixed allowance in lien thereof should be granted<br /> to such of the other libraries as may be thought expedient.<br /> This resolution was founded upon a great mass<br /> of evidence, Mr. Rees complaining of the<br /> £955 168. which eleven copies of his Encyclo-<br /> pædia might have been sold for, Mr. Baldwin<br /> averring that he had lost in his general business<br /> £1275 in four years, and so on.<br /> Nothing was done, however, until 1836. In<br /> that year, Mr. James Silk Buckingham, the<br /> founder and first editor of the Athenæum news-<br /> paper and a most voluminous writer, introduced<br /> in a very learned speech a Bill to take away the<br /> privilege from all the eleven libraries, and the<br /> Copyright Act, which was the result, took away<br /> the privilege from six of them—the libraries of<br /> Sion College, of the four Universities of Scotland,<br /> and of the King&#039;s Inns at Dublin.<br /> The Act of 1836 had a preamble that-<br /> The provisions of the said Act [of 1814 requiring<br /> gratuitous delivery of eleven copies] have in certain rospects<br /> operated to the injury of author and publishers, and have in<br /> some cases checked or prevented the publication of works<br /> of great utility and importance, and it is therefore expedient<br /> that the said Act should be amended.<br /> Parliament accordingly directed compensation<br /> to be made to the six deprived libraries out of<br /> the consolidated fund by annual payments to be<br /> ascertained “according to the value of the books<br /> which may have been actually received” by each<br /> such library upon an average of the three years<br /> ending June 30, 1836, it being also enacted<br /> that-<br /> The person of persons or body politio or corporate pro-<br /> prietors or managers of the library for the use whereof any<br /> Bach book would have been delivered, shall and they are<br /> hereby required to apply the annual compensation hereby<br /> authorised to be made in the purchase of books of literature,<br /> science and the arts, for the use of and to be kept and pre-<br /> served in such library : Provided always that it shall not<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 24 (#46) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 24<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> be lawful for the Treasury to direct the issue of any sum of Copies for four other Libraries if demanded.-<br /> money for such annual compensation until sufficient proof A similar copy, printed on the paper of which the<br /> shall have been adduced of the application of the money<br /> largest number of copies are printed for sale, must<br /> last issued to the purpose aforesaid.<br /> be delivered<br /> The words which we have italicised present not<br /> On demand thereof in writing left at the abode of the<br /> a few difficulties of construction. Clearly they<br /> pablisher thereof at any time within twelve months next<br /> impose some restriction upon the discretion of<br /> after the publication thereof under the hand of the officer of<br /> the library authorities. But what is it? The the Company of Stationers who shall from time to time be<br /> term “ books ” seems to exclude all newspapers<br /> appointed by the said company for the purposes of this Act,<br /> and magazines, and no books of mere reference,<br /> or ander the band of any other person thereto authorised<br /> by the authorities of the Bodleian Library, Oxford, the<br /> such as almanacs and directories, could be called<br /> Public Library, Cambridge, the Library of the Faculty of<br /> “ books of literature,” however useful they might Advocates, Edinburgh, the Library of Trinity College,<br /> be to the student. But it would be difficult to Dublin.<br /> exclude any novel whatever. Encyclopædias The copies are to be delivered-<br /> might be helped in by their scientific articles, but<br /> Within one month after demand made thereof in writing<br /> the point is a doubtful one.<br /> as aforesaid to the said officer of the said Company of<br /> The sums payable to the six various libraries Stationers for the time being, which copies the said officer<br /> were originally as follows: To the University of shall, and he is hereby required to receive at the ball of<br /> St. Andrews, £630; of Aberdeen, £320; of<br /> the said company for the use of the library, for which such<br /> Glasgow, £707; and of Edinburgh. £575; to<br /> demand sball be made within such twelve months as afore.<br /> said, and the said officer is hereby required to give a receipt<br /> King&#039;s Inns Library, Dublin, £433 6s. 8d.; and<br /> in writing for the same and within one month after any such<br /> to Sion College, £363 158. 2d. The two last book shall be so delivered to him as aforesaid to deliver the<br /> named sums are still annually paid ; the compen- same for the use of such library.<br /> sations to the four Scotch Universities became The publishers are authorised, if they prefer it,<br /> merged some ten years ago by virtue of the to deliver the demanded books free of expense at<br /> Universities (Scotland) Act 1889 in the much the libraries themselves to the librarians, and such<br /> larger grant of £42,000 for the general purposes delivery is made equivalent to a delivery to<br /> of the four Universities. This grant is divisible the officer of the Stationers&#039; Company. The<br /> amongst the four Scotch Universities in sbares, and<br /> penalty for not delivering books pursuant to<br /> for purposes as therein directed; the Act, how the Act is not more than £5 besides the value of<br /> ever, specially providing that “the University of the undelivered book, recoverable either sum-<br /> Aberdeen shall receive an annual sum of £320 marily before justices of the peace or by ordinary<br /> for the purchase of books for the library of the action at the suit of the librarian, who, if<br /> University.”<br /> successful, is entitled to all costs reasonably<br /> Lastly, we come to the Act of 1842, which incurred.<br /> contains the present law of the subject in five It will be seen therefore (1) that the British<br /> long and rather confused sections, the effect of Museum is entitled, without any demand, to a copy<br /> which is shortly as follows:-<br /> of every book published in the British dominions;<br /> British Museum Copy.—A printed copy of the (2) that the four other libraries are entitled, but<br /> whole of every book and of any subsequent on written demand only, to a copy of every book<br /> edition published with any additions or altera published in the United Kingdom ; (3) that the<br /> tions, printed on the best paper on which any demand may be made either by the Stationers&#039;<br /> copies are printed, must be delivered at the Company&#039;s officer or by an agent of the library<br /> British Museum, on behalf of the publisher authorities; (4) that by whomsoever the demand<br /> . Within one month after first publication, if the is made, the delivery must be made to the<br /> first publication be within the bills of mortality; Stationers&#039; Company&#039;s officer ; and (5) that it is<br /> Within three months, if the first publication for the Stationers&#039; Company&#039;s officer, and not any<br /> be in any other part of the United Kingdom; other demanding agent, to deliver the books to<br /> Within twelve months, if the first publication the four libraries, unless (6) the publishers<br /> be in any other part of the British dominions. deliver the copies free of expense to the libraries<br /> The italicised area—that of the “bills of direct.<br /> mortality”-is indeed a strange one in an Act<br /> so lively as the Copyright Act of 1842. The<br /> III.—THE STAMPING OF AGREEMENTS.<br /> “ bills&quot; themselves died some sixty years ago. A point of some little importance in the<br /> The City was always within them, and West stamping of authors&#039; agreements may interest<br /> minster soon became so, as also did Lambeth, you. A few days ago I sent an agreement, through<br /> Stepney, and other metropolitan parishes, but the local stamp office, to be stamped at Somerset<br /> St. Pancras and Marylebone were never included. House. It was an ordinary agreement to do<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 25 (#47) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 25<br /> X.<br /> om<br /> A MEMBER.<br /> certain work for a publisher, which would result, Law Courts, justifying his claims, generally for<br /> in due course, in the production of a book, the the pecuniary benefit of his adviser or counsel.<br /> copyright in which was to belong to the pub. Voilà tout ! Yes! Wiser is the poor Grub-street<br /> lishers. I asked that it should be impressed tramp who, on achieving publication, spends his<br /> with the ordinary agreement stamp of sixpence. 78. 6d. on a suitable banquet—not forgetting to<br /> After three days came back a message requiring pour out a libation to the gods.<br /> an additional 198. 6d., being the amount of the<br /> J. S. LAURIE.<br /> ad valorem duty on the sum which the publishers<br /> were to pay me for my work. In other words, V.-ALTERING WITHOUT THE AUTHOR&#039;S CONSENT.<br /> the Inland Revenue claimed to treat the agree. I want to know what is (a) the law and (b) the<br /> ment as an assignment of copyright.<br /> custom of the trade (or profession) with regard<br /> Now, to this contention there are just two fatal to altering without consent of the author the<br /> objections: (1) that, by English law, it is im. signed articles in books of reference, guide-books,<br /> possible to assign a thing which is not in existence, &amp;c., in future editions.<br /> and as my MS. was not even begun, I had, of I am supposing the author has made over all<br /> course, no copyright to assign ; (2) that the copyright.<br /> statute expressly contemplates assignment of I imagine that the whole question turns upon<br /> copyright (by entry at Stationers&#039; Hall) without the contribution being signed. Does it not ?<br /> payment of stamp duty.<br /> Although the regulations of the Oxford office<br /> did not permit me to obtain the Somerset House<br /> letter for study, I managed to express my objec-<br /> PARIS NOTES.<br /> tions to its claim to such effect that I have now<br /> received an official intimation that the claim to<br /> 5, rue Chomel.<br /> ad valorem duty will not be pressed.<br /> MAURUS JOKAI, the celebrated<br /> Hungarian novelist, is now visiting<br /> Paris, accompanied by his young wife.<br /> IV.--COPYRIGHT SECURED BY PUBLICATION AND This is his first visit since 1867. He has been<br /> SALE.<br /> warmly welcomed by his compatriots and the<br /> In the daily Press of May 16 there is allu. brethren of his craft; and the Société des Gens<br /> sion without question to Sir E. M. Thompson&#039;s de Lettres has given a banquet in his honour.<br /> opinion that “ practically all published books Although M. Jokai numbers seventy-five years,<br /> are registered at Stationers&#039; Hall, and are thus well-counted, he is quite out of the running as<br /> copyright.” I venture to doubt if more than regards age beside the “ beaux vieillards ” who still<br /> 25 per cent. of published books are registered at hold honoured places in the ranks of Parisian<br /> all, and that for the simple reason that such regis- writers. M. E.Cormon-author of so many popular<br /> tration confers no copyright, or, in point of fact, plays, and father of the well-known painter-is<br /> similarly as letters patent, any privilege beyond in his ninety-second year. He is an assiduous<br /> being the essential preliminary to litigation. theatre-goer, and was lately in evidence at a dress<br /> Indeed, even this is permissible just before any rehearsal at the Théatre de la République, busily<br /> action is entered ; and in a recent threatened suit engaged in superintending the revival of “ Une<br /> I myself adopted this course successfully with refe. Cause Célèbre,&quot; the joint production of MM.<br /> rence to a production fifteen years old. Seven and Adolphe d&#039;Ennery and E. Cormon, success.<br /> sixpence per work on all published books would fully performed at the Ambigu theatre a quarter<br /> obviously yield a mine of vast wealth either to the of a century ago. (M. d&#039;Ennery died in 1899, aged<br /> Stationers&#039; Corporation or any other official eighty-eight years, possessed of a fortune which<br /> beneficiary, unconditionally on any material con- amounted in round figures to about £400,000.)<br /> sideration whatsoever. The hardship of the MM. Aurélian Scholl and Paul Meurice, likewise,<br /> invent is is infinitely worse, since pairate can see leave M. Jokai behind. The former resumes<br /> and study any existing specification and procure his pen at intervals in dilatory virtuoso fashion.<br /> another for himself by a slight alteration.<br /> His senior, M. Paul Meurice, still compares<br /> As I understand the matter after a life-long favourably in literary activity with a score of<br /> experience, and the production of more than 100 modern authors. He is an ardent disciple of<br /> genuine copyrights on which no fee has been paid, Victor Hugo, to boot; and recently presented<br /> I fancy I am entitled to affirm that the sale of to the National Library a collection of over a<br /> even a single volume across the counter con- thousand documents, photographs, &amp;c., connected<br /> stitutes publication. In case of dispute, why, the with the great French writer and his family. This<br /> owner must either succumb or fight it out in the collection will shortly be open to the public.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 26 (#48) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 26<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> ing. Only once in his life did he take part in the<br /> latter sport, when he fired by mistake on a<br /> gendarme, and was summoned for the offence.<br /> AN EMINENT NONAGENARIAN.<br /> But the doyen of the French Academy and the<br /> “ beaux vieillards litteraires &quot; is M. Ernest<br /> Legouvé. His birth certificate is exbibited in the<br /> Paris Pavilion at the Exhibition. It is dated<br /> Monday, Feb. 16, 1807. M. Legouvé enjoys at<br /> the present moment the full possession of all his<br /> faculties. He is extremely keen on fencing, and<br /> attributes his robust health to his diurnal twenty<br /> or thirty minutes&#039; practice with the foils.<br /> “ The love of fencing,&quot; he asserts, “is not<br /> merely a taste-it is a passion. C&#039;est le jeu, avec<br /> le vice en moins et la santé en plus !&quot;<br /> The eminent nonagenarian estimates his supple-<br /> mentary achievements with unusual modesty.<br /> “Although my plays have been represented six-<br /> teen hundred times at the Comédie Française,”<br /> he says, “I am neither a great poet nor a great<br /> dramatist. But since I have applied my<br /> dramatic and poetical faculty to teaching the<br /> young, I have succeeded in writing lessons which<br /> were not tiresome. I have spoken to youth in a<br /> language which it has loved and understood.” This<br /> is, perhaps, the success which M. Legouvé values<br /> most highly. His latest work, issued a few<br /> months ago, contains the lectures delivered to the<br /> students at the Sèvres Normal School. At the<br /> period when this volume was compiled its<br /> author designed it for the closing memorial of<br /> his long literary career. Several stray bints,<br /> however, incline us to believe that M. Legouvé<br /> has now another work on hand, which will appear<br /> shortly.<br /> M. JULES VERNE.<br /> The plays and novels of M. Jules Verne are as<br /> popular as ever. Their author has advantageously<br /> renewed the contracts connected with his drama-<br /> tised versions of “Michel Strogoff” and “Le<br /> Tour du Monde.” He is at present engaged on a<br /> new volume for the Extraordinary Voyage series.<br /> If his wonderful fertility and health hold good<br /> for a few more years, he will undoubtedly attain<br /> what is generally asserted to be his grand<br /> desideratum—viz., the publication of his hundredth<br /> volume. M. Jules Verne is in his seventy-third<br /> year. He lives quietly at Amiens, and patronises<br /> a vegetarian régime. A slight limp, the result of<br /> an accident many years ago, gives him a hesitating<br /> gait, while his mild blue eyes and placid expression<br /> appear evidence of a nature wholly at variance<br /> with the wild adventurous types he delights in<br /> creating. He formerly possessed a small yacht,<br /> the Saint Michel, which never ventured itself in<br /> rougher waters than those of the English Channel<br /> and Mediterranean Sea. The author of “ Twenty<br /> Thousand Leagues under the Sea&quot; considers<br /> fishing a barbarous amusement and detests hunt.<br /> ACADEMY Prizes.<br /> The French Academy has a varded the sum of<br /> 5000 francs (prix Alfred Née) to&#039; M. Brieux for<br /> his last graphic drama entitled “La Robe<br /> Rouge.” The fortunate recipient is now engaged<br /> in writing a new play entitled “La Petite Amie,&quot;<br /> whose details have not yet been made public.<br /> Mme. Jean Bertheroy has been awarded 4000<br /> francs (prix d&#039;éloquence) for her essay on the<br /> French poet André Chenier (1762-1794), while<br /> M. Pierre de la Gorse has received 9000 francs<br /> (prix Gobert) for his “Histoire du Second<br /> Empire). A number of minor prizes have also<br /> been awarded.<br /> In order to encourage literary talent the Var<br /> Academy at Toulon has announced its intention of<br /> celebrating its centennial anniversary by a literary<br /> competition on six given subjects. The prizes<br /> will consist of valuable artistic objects, and the<br /> winners&#039; names and compositions will be inscribed<br /> in the Golden Book which the Academy will<br /> publish on that occasion. The manuscripts of the<br /> unsuccessful candidates will not be returned.<br /> This is certainly rather hard on the unsuccessful<br /> candidates.<br /> Rocks AHEAD FOR THE PUBLISHERS.<br /> In deciding a dispute between two publishers,<br /> the Civil Chamber recently gave some interesting<br /> information which completely upset the current<br /> illusion respecting the copyright of the title of a<br /> paper. It distinctly stated that the property of a<br /> journal&#039;s title could only lapse through non-<br /> usage; but that the popular belief that a non-<br /> usage of one vear was sufficient to annul such a<br /> copyright was an erroneous idea, based on no<br /> legal foundation. Whether editor and publisher<br /> would alike be held responsible for the infringe.<br /> ment of a similar copyright was not stated.<br /> The latter is walking softly since the Third<br /> Civil Chamber has abolished his immunity, and<br /> rendered him liable for the articles printed under<br /> his direction. The action brought by fifty-three<br /> merchants, manufacturers, &amp;c., against the pro.<br /> prietors and editors of the Antijuif has led to<br /> this commendable reform. “Granted,” said the<br /> judgment, “that ... if Article 43 of the<br /> law of July 29, 1881, enacts that the printer<br /> cannot be penally pursued as an accomplice (in<br /> virtue of Article 60 of the Penal Code referring<br /> to printed matter) except in the event, and under<br /> the conditions, foreseen by Article 6 of the law of<br /> June 7, 1848, relating to riotous assemblages;<br /> this law has only been framed from a penal point<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 27 (#49) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 37<br /> of view, and is not intended to detract in any Poor “Caliban-Bergerat” cannot boast such<br /> manner from the principles laid down by the good fortune. The fourth and last volume of his<br /> Civil Law, which render each person responsible “Théâtre Complet d&#039;Emile Bergerat” has just<br /> for the prejudice caused by his fault, &amp;c.” been issued by Ollendorff. Rarely has a writer<br /> For which, and sundry other causes, the printing of equal merit been handicapped hy a more per-<br /> society known as the Société Paul Dupont has sistent run of ill-luck than that which has for<br /> been separately and jointly condemned with the years dogged the productions of the talented<br /> proprietors and editors of the Antijuif to pay author of “ Plus que Reine.&quot; His fierce defence<br /> damages amounting to twenty-eight thousand of the children of his brain make part of the<br /> francs for injurious matter printed in the columns dramatic history of the period. In the preface<br /> of the Antijuif. Wherefore the Israelites rejoice to the first volume of the “ Théâtre Complet,” M.<br /> and the Philistines mourn.<br /> Bergerat states that the publication of this work<br /> represents thirty-five years of struggle—“not<br /> CONTEMPORARY FEMINISM.<br /> without courage, perhaps &quot;—for theatrical life.<br /> The publication of the “Vierges Fortes &quot; series A little later he claims the glory of having<br /> -comprising two novels respectively entitled invented the following three words, viz., Tripa-<br /> “ Frédérique&quot; and“ Léa ”-of M. Marcel Prévost, touillage, Cabotinville, Soireux, which, he says,<br /> was quite a social event. The reason is obvious. have become national property, and sum up the<br /> Both works deal in a masterly style with the entire history of the theatrical customs of his<br /> burning question of contemporary Feminism, time. M. Rostand would probably entertain a<br /> which is the prominent topic of the day. France different opinion.<br /> DARRACOTTI Scott.<br /> -or rather Paris-is witnessing the tidal rise of<br /> the Feministic Era which England successfully<br /> encountered, developed, and utilised several<br /> decades ago. Everything worth reading on the<br /> NOTES AND NEWS.<br /> subject is eagerly perused. The “Femmes<br /> Nouvelles ” of Paul and Victor Margueritte have<br /> INHE annual dinner of the Women Writers was<br /> just attained their twentieth re-edition (chez<br /> held in the Criterion Restaurant on June 25.<br /> Plon). Nevertheless, M. Prévost still remains<br /> Mrs. Humphry Ward was president, and<br /> the undisputed leader and apostle of the move-<br /> among a large company were Mrs. Bishop, Mrs.<br /> ment.<br /> Hodgson Burnett, Miss Ellen Thorneycroft Fowler,<br /> A recent article from bis pen in the Figaro,<br /> Miss Beatrice Harraden, Dr. Margaret Todd, Mrs.<br /> anent the author&#039;s right of publishing “ Le Secret<br /> Clifford, Mrs. Campbell Praed, Miss Violet Hunt,<br /> sentimental à deux,&quot; has given rise to some<br /> and Miss Clo Graves. The meeting was most<br /> piquant controversy between him and M. Gabriele<br /> successful. In concluding an eloquent reference<br /> D&#039;Annunzio — whom his admirers here have<br /> to the late Miss Kingsley, Mrs. Humphry Ward<br /> surnamed “the Marcel Prévost of Italy.” The<br /> latter took umbrage at a supposed reflection<br /> Those true knights-errant of intelligence and pity, who<br /> (in an article which he confessed he had not<br /> thought no travail of mind and body too great to face if<br /> read) questioning the good taste of his having only they might come at the truth and tell it, who wandered,<br /> staged Madame Eleonora Duse, under the thin suffered, laaghed, and learned, who made a new wisdom of<br /> disguise of the Foscarina&#039;s name, as the heroine<br /> their fellows—it was of them that they might say in the<br /> of his new novel, “ Le Feu,” which work is now<br /> words of a true poet who was with them that night<br /> &quot;Out of danger, dreams, disasters,<br /> appearing in serial form in the Revue de Paris.<br /> They arise to be our masters.”<br /> No such reflection had ever been made—at least, Small and thin was the true band of them in every age.<br /> by M. Prévost. Matters were finally explained, One of its most honoured members assuredly was with them<br /> and the susceptible Italian declared himself satis-<br /> as she spoke, Mrs. Bishop; and of their inmost company<br /> fied. The celebrity of the personages concerned<br /> let them as women rejoice in it with pride that night was<br /> Mary Kingsley.<br /> has given undue notoriety to the incident.<br /> The members of the Authors&#039; Club held a<br /> A DRAMATIC CONTRAST.<br /> dinner on Monday, June 11, when Mr. E. F.<br /> The health of M. Edmond Rostand is reported Knight, the correspondent of the Morning Post<br /> to be completely re-established. According to who was wounded at Belmont, was the guest of<br /> the theatrical returns published at the end of the evening, and Mr. Bloundelle-Burton, an old<br /> May, the “ Aiglon” is making 11,000 francs friend of Mr. Knight, and the well-known author<br /> a day, and “ Cyrano de Bergerac&quot; 10,000 francs. of the “ Hispaniola Plate,&quot; was the chairman..<br /> Whereby the lucky dramatist daily pockets a Mr. Bloundelle-Burton made a very interesting<br /> royalty of 2500 francs—a princely revenue. speech with regard to Mr. Knight&#039;s career, and<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> said :<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 28 (#50) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 28<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> Mr. Knight in response gave a graphic description<br /> of the fighting powers of Tommy Atkins and his<br /> experiences during the battle of Belmont.<br /> Mr. Frankfort Moore proposed the health of<br /> the other guests, amongst whom was Mr. Charlton,<br /> one of the engineer officers of H.M.S. Powerful.<br /> Mr. Charlton gave a detailed account of the part<br /> that the crew of the Powerful had taken in the<br /> war from the time of their leaving Singapore.<br /> There were about thirty members present, Mr.<br /> Percy White, Mr. E. A. Morton, Mr. G. H.<br /> Thring, Mr. Douglas Sladen, and Mr. M. H.<br /> Spielmann being among the number.<br /> On Monday, June 18, the Authors&#039; Club held a<br /> dinner to Lord Strathcona. There was a large<br /> gathering. Mr. Robert Machray was in the chair.<br /> In answer to the toast of his health Lord Strath-<br /> cona gave some very interesting facts about his<br /> connection with the Hudson Bay Company, and<br /> that company&#039;s connection with the Empire, and<br /> he ended his speech with a statement regarding<br /> the enthusiasm of the Canadians in their action<br /> in the present war. He stated that all the<br /> Colonials were not so much fighting for the Mother<br /> Country as fighting for themselves as part of the<br /> Empire. His speech was enthusiastically received.<br /> and dreary as the mines of Potosi. Yet from either there is<br /> no return, and though little confident of finding content-<br /> ment-happiness is too proud a term-I must work, I<br /> believe, in those damp caverns till once the whole mind is<br /> recast or the lamp of life has ceased to burn within it.<br /> In the same collection was the following letter<br /> from the Countess of Blessington :-<br /> Since I first sent a book before the public I never,<br /> directly or indirectly, asked for a notice of a book of mine.<br /> I have hitherto been so fortunate as to have had my works<br /> kindly treated by the Press, but this kind treatment would<br /> have given me but little satisfaction had I owed it to any<br /> solicitations of mine.<br /> The following letter by Dr. Conan Doyle is taken<br /> from the columns of the Daily Telegraph, to whose<br /> veteran war correspondent in South Africa, Mr.<br /> Bennet Burleigh, the letter was addressed. “As<br /> I fear to spoil or transpose Dr. Conan Doyle&#039;s<br /> graphic depiction of the event,” says Mr.<br /> Burleigh, “I give it in his own words&quot;:<br /> Brandfort, Monday, May 7.<br /> My dear Barleigh, - ... and saw a little fight<br /> beyond the Vet River. We had a curious adventure on the<br /> way back, which might perhaps make a paragraph for a<br /> letter if ever the great events run short. Langman and I<br /> were riding back, and had reached the point where the<br /> engagement was the day before, when a mounted Kaffi,<br /> came across us, and told us that a wounded Englishman<br /> had been deserted or overlooked, and was out some two or<br /> three miles to the west on the veldt. We got him to guide<br /> us, and set off in search. At last, in the middle of a large<br /> clear space, we came across him, but he was dead. He was shot<br /> in the stomach and through one arm, and had apparently bled<br /> to death. He belonged to the New South Wales Mounted<br /> Infantry, and had the initials “N. M&#039;M.&quot; upon bis batand on a<br /> silk handkerchief in his pocket. Horse and rifle were gone. A<br /> carious detail was that his water-bottle lay beside him, and<br /> on it was balanced a red chess pawn. The other chessmen<br /> were in his haversack out of his reach. We laid the poor<br /> fellow across my saddle and led the horse back to the road,<br /> where we placed him under a telegraph post, and told the<br /> officer of the next convoy, who promised to have him<br /> decently buried.<br /> Close to Brandfort we saw mounted and armed Boers on<br /> a hill within half a mile of us. We were told that they<br /> were Boers, and did not believe it, but this morning we<br /> learn that they have been pursued. I suppose that they<br /> thought we were too small game, but as we were unarmed and<br /> apon tired horses, we were lucky to get past them.<br /> A. CONAN DOYLE.<br /> The President of the Argentine Republic has<br /> accepted the adhesion of the Kingdom of Italy to<br /> the Treaty of Montevideo-A South American<br /> Copyright Union. Signor F. Foa discusses, in<br /> an interesting article in the pages of our Italian<br /> contemporary I Dritti d&#039;Autore, the value to<br /> Italian authors of this new international agree<br /> ment. The advantages which it will confer do<br /> not appear to be very great.<br /> Lord Thring contributes an interesting article<br /> on “The Copyright Bills, 1900,&quot; to the Nine.<br /> teenth Century for June. The article is a plain<br /> statement of facts. At its conclusion the author<br /> remarks dryly, respecting the Bills, “Whatever<br /> may be their demerits, they claim to have<br /> reduced the law into an intelligible shape, in<br /> which it is capable of being criticised by the most<br /> unlearned of authors, and of being amended by<br /> the most inexperienced of legislators.”<br /> NOTES FROM AMERICA.<br /> A letter written by Carlyle from Edinburgh<br /> in 1821 was sold in London recently in the<br /> collection belonging to the late Chevalier de<br /> Chatelain. It was addressed to Dr. Allen, and<br /> contained the following revelation of the philo-<br /> sopher&#039;s mind-he was then only twenty-six :-<br /> Literature is like money, the appetite increases by<br /> gratification. The mines of literature, too, are unwholesome<br /> LOLLOWING the evidence of publishers that<br /> F there is an improving market for the<br /> better class of books, the New York<br /> Evening Post adds the testimony of the Hart-<br /> ford (Conn.) Public Library, as given in the<br /> president&#039;s annual report. From this it appears<br /> that there has been a large gain in more serious<br /> reading matter at the expense of tiction. As<br /> compared with two years ago, novels have fallen<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 29 (#51) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 29<br /> off 7 per cent., while sociology has gained about<br /> 8 per cent., the fine arts and history 11 per cent.<br /> each, and biography 15 per cent.<br /> A complete edition of the works of Mr. Thomas<br /> Wentworth Higginson—who, at seventy-five, is<br /> still active with his pen-is being prepared by<br /> Messrs. Houghton, Mifflin and Co.<br /> A new serial by Mr. Hamlin Garland has just<br /> begun. It is a story of Western life, entitled<br /> “The Eagle&#039;s Heart,” and deals with adventurous<br /> life in cow towns and mining settlements.<br /> Commenting on the recent financial difficulties<br /> of Messrs. Appleton, the Sewanee Review for<br /> April (Longmans) says:<br /> Coming so soon after the Harper assignment, this notable<br /> event in the publishing world calls special attention to the<br /> fact that the pablisher of to-day does business on very<br /> different lines from his predecessor. Production must now<br /> be on a large scale if success is to be attained, and produc-<br /> tion on a large scale means a big smash if affairs go wrong.<br /> Local booksellers have long since gone to the wall; will<br /> publishers go, too, leaving a trust monarch of all it surveys ?<br /> We hope not.<br /> The people of Northampton (Mass.) and dis-<br /> tinguished guests from abroad have just erected a<br /> memorial to Jonathan Edwards, the American<br /> philosopher of the eighteenth century, and a<br /> For the eighteenth century, and, a<br /> proposal is made to issue a new edition of his<br /> works.<br /> &quot; Janice Meredith” has been dramatised, the<br /> rights of production going to Miss Mary Manner-<br /> ing. Mr. Daniel Frohman will present“ Richard<br /> Carvel ” in the coming season.<br /> Ogilvie, Stuart<br /> Skeat, The Rev. Professor<br /> Parker, Louis N.<br /> Smith, Dr. and Mrs. Barnett<br /> Pinero, Mrs.<br /> Sonnenschein, A.<br /> Prinsep, Val<br /> Thring, G. Herbert<br /> Scott, Clement<br /> Todd, Dr. Margaret<br /> Senior, W.<br /> Zangwill, I.<br /> Shaw, Bernard<br /> And many others.<br /> The Chairman gave the toast of the evening,<br /> and began his speech by an allusion to the losses<br /> that letters had suffered through the deaths of Mr.<br /> Ruskin, Dr. Martineau, Mr. R. D. Blackmore, and<br /> Mr. G. W. Steevens. Proceeding, Mr. Pinero said :<br /> This corporation of prominent literary men and<br /> women to-night, for the first time in its history-<br /> for the first time in the history of any modern<br /> literary association-extends a kindly hand to the<br /> poor hack-playwright. What is the reason, ladies<br /> and gentlemen, underlying this generous and<br /> gracious act on the part of the governing body of<br /> your Society? I cannot tell you. I can only<br /> indulge in surmise, in hypotheses. A vainer<br /> person than myself might suppose that your<br /> council is desirous of promoting a feeling of<br /> fraternity, of establishing something approach-<br /> ing a bond of equality between writers of books<br /> and writers of plays. (Cheers.) But I cannot<br /> think that; the assumption would be too arro.<br /> gant. At the furthest, I can only believe that<br /> certain members of your Council-grey-haired<br /> men, perhaps, anxious to be at peace with the<br /> world, even with playwrights; gentlemen of<br /> acknowledged literary eminence, but possessed of<br /> those normal feelings of compassion of which<br /> writers of scholarly English are not necessarily<br /> destitute—I can only believe that these gentlemen<br /> have been impelled by a simple good-natured<br /> impulse to bestow a passing pat-on-the-back upon<br /> a poor, distant relative. (Laughter.) It may be<br /> that I take too depressed a view of the whole<br /> affair. It may be that the novelist is not only<br /> gradually relaxing in his disdain for the drama,<br /> but is applying himself assiduously to the task<br /> of grasping the special conditions of dramatic<br /> writing. It may be that in doing this he has<br /> become possessed of the suspicion that these con-<br /> ditions are exceptionally arduous, that they are<br /> conditions requiring a wide and curious knowledge<br /> of life and of manners, a rapid but assured touch<br /> in the delineation of surface characteristics,<br /> an unerringly accurate ear in striking the deeper<br /> notes of pathos and of passion, and a wise<br /> economy of selection and a dexterity of composi.<br /> tion exacted by no other form of art. It may be,<br /> too, that from his own young experience he is<br /> beginning to perceive that while out of the<br /> theatre the despised playwright labours in cir.<br /> cumstances demanding the exercise of the closest<br /> application and the practice of the sternest self-<br /> denial, the writer of drama should bring to the<br /> ANNUAL DINNER OF THE INCORPORATED<br /> SOCIETY OF AUTHORS.<br /> [Owing to the fact that the original dinner report has been<br /> lost or mislaid, the present curtailed report has been<br /> inserted at the last moment.]<br /> THE annual dinner of the Society was held in<br /> the King&#039;s Hall of Holborn Restaurant on<br /> May 16, and was a large and highly suc-<br /> cessful gathering Mr. A. W. Pinero presided.<br /> Among the company were<br /> Archer, William<br /> Greville, Lady Violet<br /> Ball, Sir Robert<br /> Grundy, Sydney<br /> Beringer, Mrs. Oscar<br /> Hare, Mr. and Mrs. John<br /> Besant, Sir Walter<br /> Hawkins, Anthony Hope<br /> Blake, Dr. Sophia<br /> Hooking, Rev. Silas<br /> Browning, Oscar<br /> Hollingshead, John<br /> Castle, Egerton<br /> Hunt, Holman<br /> Charley, Sir W. J.<br /> Jacobs, W. W.<br /> Collier, The Hon. John and Lee, Sidney<br /> Mrs.<br /> Lennox, Lady William<br /> Colin Campbell, Lady<br /> Marshall, Capt. R.<br /> Courtney, W.L.<br /> Middlemass, Miss Jean<br /> Craigie, Mrs.<br /> Monkswell, Lord<br /> Fitoh, Sir Joshua<br /> Norma<br /> an, Mr. and Mrs.<br /> Grand, Mmo. Sarab<br /> Henry<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 30 (#52) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 30<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> rehearsal of his work evidence of his capacity for does she persist in calling herself Anthony<br /> gently influencing and gaining the sympathy and Hope ? &quot; (Laughter.) But what I was about to<br /> support of clever men and women of diverse but say is that, with writers of such high account<br /> peculiarly sensitive temperaments, without which devoting themselves in part to the theatre, it will<br /> capacity no dramatist ought to pass the stage be a matter of small wonder if the prevalent and<br /> door; possessing which capacity he might, in disparaging idea of contemporary drama, and of<br /> other and more fortunate walks of life, have led those who give their energies wholly to dramatic<br /> parties or won battles. And I am encouraged to writing, does not ultimately yield to a fairer, a<br /> think that there is something in all this, by more truthful, estimate. Only one danger do I<br /> the fact that the drama has lately received many apprehend from the invasion of the playhouse by<br /> notable contributions from authors enjoying the novelist-and I confess the contemplation of<br /> enviable reputations in other departments of litera- it chills me to the marrow—the possibility that<br /> ture. I will not attempt to furnish you with a the mere playwright may some day find his occu-<br /> complete roll of these authors; in such an endea- pation gone. Indeed, the rich imagination of<br /> vour the memory might prove treacherous, and Mr. Wells might form a conception of a time<br /> the omission of a single name would, perhaps, when the carefully preserved skeleton of the<br /> make one appear less ignorant than ungracious. dramatist who was not a novelist will be all<br /> But I cannot refrain from mentioning, especially, that is left to remind people of the old order<br /> two writers who have thus distinguished them of things. However, time alone can decide<br /> selves—who have, if I may say so, made them- whether or not events are to justify these<br /> selves indispensable to the modern stage. I fears, and, meanwhile, it is well, I suggest to you,<br /> speak of the gentleman who is incautiously that we should all dwell together in the most<br /> described in the list of your Council as Mr. perfect good-fellowship. It may be that the im-<br /> Hawkins, but who masks himself closely from provisatore, reciting his romances in the market<br /> the public under another title, and of that charm- place, with flashing eye and to the accompani.<br /> ing lady who, by her own perversity, obliges me ment of sweeping gesture, is a slightly more<br /> to be so ungallant as to allude to her as John imposing figure than the marionette man as we<br /> Oliver Hobbes. (Cheers.) I wonder whether espy him through the curtains of his booth<br /> any of you ladies and gentlemen are, like myself, lovingly assorting his little company of dolls.<br /> a little disturbed by the dark disguises of certain But each plays his part : each suffers or enjoys<br /> of our modern writers. (Laughter.) I confess I his share of defeat or of success; each, upon<br /> find it difficult to feel quite at ease with mysterious occasion, tightens his belt in answer to the<br /> figures in sombre draperies and slouch bats. One cravings of hunger, or releases a button after a<br /> is almost inclined, for example, in speaking of congratulatory feast; each knows what it is to<br /> Mr. Hobbes and of the creator of the delightful be waked from sleep by the sound of his own<br /> “ Prisoner of Zenda,” to drop into a whisper. sighing, or to shirk purposely the slumber that<br /> And the confusion in the public mind, too, pro- would suspend, even for a moment, the conscious.<br /> duced by the aliases of popular authors is ness of a rare prosperity. Let them, therefore<br /> positively lamentable. Only the other day, while the marionette man and the weaver of<br /> on a visit to a provincial town, I found myself tales — foregather at the end of their day&#039;s<br /> sitting beside a young lady who takes an eager, labour, as we do to-night, and, between their<br /> if somewhat uninformed, interest in current draughts of Falerno, console one another, and<br /> literature. “I wish you would explain to me,” stimulate one another, and so help one another,<br /> she said, “why many of our famous novelists until the hour comes when the friendship must<br /> appear to be so anxious to conceal their identity.&quot; perforce be broken, when the voice in the market<br /> I hazarded the conjecture that it is, in some place is hushed, or the booth is found empty. In<br /> instances perhaps, a precautionary measure on the this spirit, ladies and gentlemen, in the spirit<br /> part of those who may desire, in later years, the which this Society has done much, and will, I<br /> opportunity of living down their successes. “Tell venture to prophesy, do even more in the future,<br /> me,&quot; my companion went on, evidently far from to promote ; in the spirit expressed by<br /> satisfied, “tell me, have you ever met Mrs. the time-worn, but still eloquent, phrase-the<br /> Craigie ?” I said I had had that privilege. Brotherhood of Letters—I beg leave to submit<br /> “ And what is your opinion of her as an author?” the toast which it is my duty to propose. (Cheers.)<br /> was the next question. I had no hesitation in With this toast I have the privilege of associating<br /> replying, “ Assuredly one of the most brilliant the name of the gentleman of whom I have<br /> women writers any country has produced.” “I already tremulously made mention-Mr. Hawkins.<br /> agree with you,” said my fair friend, “I have And here you will, I am sure, appreciate the<br /> read every word she has written. But why- renewed difficulties of my position. But if I<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 31 (#53) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 31<br /> cannot overcome these difficulties, I can, I think, he told them that that was why he wrote them-<br /> partially evade them; and with your permission (laughter)—and he therefore appreciated more the<br /> I do so in this wise, by associating with this attitude of a man like Lord Monkswell, who had<br /> toast the name of Mr. Hawkins and coupling probably not read his works, but had recognised,<br /> with the name of Mr. Hawkins that of his friend, in his attitude towards the law of copyright, that<br /> Mr. Hope. (Laughter.) Now, of Mr. Hawkins an author must live and have the means of feed.<br /> I can say little, except that he is a devoted and ing bis brain so that it could produce the splendid<br /> invaluable servant of this Society; and of Mr. visions that other people delighted to read about<br /> Hope you will require me to tell you nothing, for in his books. (Laughter.) He thought the<br /> is he not known to his brother and sister authors rights of authors should be as long-lived as<br /> as a good comrade, and to the wide world as a those of the original shareholders in the New<br /> writer of combined daintiness and power, and of River Company. After all, Shakespeare might<br /> apparently inexhaustible fertility ? Indeed, tbe without exaggeration be considered to have done<br /> worst I have ever heard of Mr. Anthony Hope- as much for the nation as one of those share.<br /> and if I have not heard it, I must have dreamed holders. (Laughter and cheers.)<br /> it-is that it may be remarked of him as a writer LORD MONKSWELL responded.<br /> that his profundity will never be remembered till Mr. HENRY Norman, in giving “ The Chair-<br /> we have succeeded in forgetting his vivacity. I man,” said the laughter caused by Mr. Pinero<br /> do not know how just a reflection you may consider was not as the crackling of thorns under the pot,<br /> this to be, but it is one that can be more easily but was always ornamented by a valuable idea.<br /> repelled by Mr. Hawkins, or apologised for by He had given to the world the solemnities as seen<br /> Mr. Hope, than dealt with by myself. I will no through the eyes of the humorist. He had held<br /> longer, therefore, stand between you and these up the mirror to life as it was, and consequently<br /> gentlemen. I give you“ The Society of Authors.” the absurd cbarge of indecency was made against<br /> Let us drink to its continued, its increasing, him. (Laughter.) The toast would be drunk<br /> usefulness and welfare. (Cheers.)<br /> with especial heartiness. (Cheers.)<br /> Mr. ANTHONY HOPE HAWKINS replied to the Mr. Pinero made a brief reply, and the com-<br /> toast. The Society of Authors, he said, was pany adjourned to tea and talk.<br /> making steady progress, but it wanted money.<br /> Every day it was asked to undertake important<br /> work which it could not undertake because of<br /> this deficiency. There was notably the case of<br /> THIRTEEN YEARS AGO.<br /> America. The relations of literary men with that<br /> country were becoming more and more intimate<br /> and important, and the Society felt it desirable to<br /> IN the year 1887, shortly after the foundation<br /> maintain in America a permanent staff to look<br /> 1 of the Society, an article appeared in Time,<br /> after the interests of British authors. (Hear,<br /> e a monthly magazine now extinct, on the<br /> hear.) Next year the Society would make a start<br /> Society of Authors. It is signed with the name<br /> with the Pension Fund. A man who had done<br /> of J. Neville Porter, a writer of whom I know<br /> good literary work would not under this scheme get<br /> nothing. His name is not in the list of Barristers<br /> charity from the Society, but his brothers would<br /> and Solicitors for this current year. He writes,<br /> offer him a testimonial in the shape of a good,<br /> however, with apparent knowledge of law, and was<br /> solid pension. (Cheers.)<br /> laudably desirous of presenting the facts of the<br /> Mr. BERNARD Shaw then proposed “The<br /> case as he understood them. So much has been<br /> Guests.&quot; He said he bad often been asked why<br /> done since that time that it is well to look<br /> he became an author, and had given many<br /> back and to consider arguments and statements<br /> reasons, most of them untrue—(laughter)-but<br /> advanced thirteen years ago.<br /> the real reason was because he had an unconquer.<br /> THE SALE OF A MS. OUTRIGHT.<br /> able aversion to honest work of any description. We find a publisher writing to say that he<br /> (Laughter.) He had had to work a good deal should take no notice at all of any opinion of the<br /> harder than people who had adopted honest Society as to the fair price. He understands by<br /> means, and he would therefore point out to those this time that the author would then go to some-<br /> who had not become authors, and therefore one else. Mr. Porter remarks, however, that<br /> wanted to—(laughter)—that, if they entered the authors are not the best judges of the value of<br /> profession on his grounds, they would probably MSS. He did not understand that the Society<br /> be disappointed. (Laughter.) When people intended to proceed with the advice and help of<br /> told him, with a slight air of unexpectedness, secretaries and solicitors always engaged upon the<br /> that they had read his books and admired them, subject of Literary Property, and with a perma-<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 32 (#54) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 32<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> nent committee also continually engaged upon inore than, as said above, a solicitor or a medical<br /> the subject; so that it may now be fairly ad. man.<br /> vanced that the Chairman and Secretary of the The author&#039;s risk, where there is risk, is his<br /> Society, not to speak of the Committee, have time and labour; the publisher&#039;s risk, where there<br /> between them a wider and firmer grasp of the is risk, is the money actually expended and the<br /> subject than any publisher or company of pub. proportionate cost of his establishment.<br /> lishers.<br /> Here is another reference to a leading case :<br /> Here, however, is a warning which should be<br /> A contract between an anthor and a publisher, that the<br /> looked into. We have always protested against<br /> latter should, at his own risk and expense, publish a work<br /> any alteration of an author&#039;s work without his belonging to the former upon payment of an equal division<br /> consent. Read this note from the article :-<br /> of the profits after all charges had been defrayed, may,<br /> It bas been decided in the case of Cox v. Cox (11 Hare,<br /> according to the dictum of Lord Justice Tarner in the case<br /> 118), that in the absence of a specific contract, reserving<br /> of Stevens v. Benning (6 D. M. G. 229), be considered in<br /> to the author a qualified copyright, the purchaser of a MS.<br /> the double light of a licence and a partnership-a licence for<br /> is entitled to alter and deal with it according to his<br /> the publication of the treatise, and then a joint adventure<br /> discretion. The consequence has been that several treatises<br /> between the author and publisher in the copies to be thus<br /> have been published in &amp; ridiculous manner, much to the<br /> published. A pablisher, therefore, on the half-profit<br /> prejudice of the writers. The remedy for this is, of course,<br /> Bystem, is bound to show the author his accounts and<br /> a matter for the agreement-form.<br /> vouchers in respect of the work published, or an action<br /> may be commenced to compel him to do so unless the pab.<br /> lisher satisfies the judge that there is some preliminary<br /> THE HALF-Profit System.<br /> question to be tried. It is not, therefore, necessary to bave<br /> It appears that Mr. E. Marston, according to &amp; stipulation in the agreement to this effect.<br /> this writer, had written to the papers, stating<br /> When there is no assignment of copyright in<br /> that he knew nothing of any secret profits.<br /> the agreement, and no stipulated time during<br /> It was stated, from knowledge, by those who which the publisher is entitled to publish a book,<br /> then represented the Society that there existed a<br /> can the author put an end to the contract ? On<br /> widespread system of secret profits, viz., by adding this point Mr. Porter is instructive :-<br /> to the cost of printing, paper, corrections, and<br /> If the author endeavour to put an end to the contract,<br /> binding; and further, by advertisements costing and to stop the publication of any subsequent edition by<br /> nothing to the publisher, such as advertisements the publisher, he must take action for this object previous<br /> in their own organs and by exchanges. It has to any expenso being incurred by the publisher on account<br /> been remarked repeatedly that in the agreement.<br /> of such new edition; otherwise the publisher is entitled to<br /> be repaid this cost, and to enjoy the benefit of all the profit<br /> forms put forward by the Publishers&#039; Association<br /> the hope of which induced him to incur this expense. But<br /> they claim the right of adding percentages, and when expense has not been incurred by the pablisher on a<br /> say nothing about the advertisements which cost subsequent edition, the author can lawfully terminate the<br /> nothing.<br /> joint undertaking, and prevent any further issue of his work<br /> Mr. Porter in this article falls into the trap<br /> by the publisher, even if the latter has stereotyped the<br /> book before the publication of the last published edition.<br /> set for him, and looks upon the publisher as an<br /> In deciding this question in 1838 in the case of Reade v.<br /> agent as well as a publisher. The publisher is Bentley (4 Kay &amp; J. 664-6), Vice-Chancellor Wood (after.<br /> entitled, Mr. Porter says, to a profit on every wards Lord Hatherley) pointed out the difficulties which<br /> thing, to cover incidental expenses, and the cost<br /> were connected with the subject, and the grounds on which<br /> of his establishment; in other words, to cover<br /> his judgment was based. He mentioned that, while on the<br /> one band it might be stated on bebalf of the publisher that<br /> his own work in the business. What claim has<br /> he had devoted the benefit of his talents and status as a<br /> he, after this, on the proceeds of the book ? And publisher to the undertaking, and bad incurred charges in<br /> why are not the author&#039;s “incidental expenses &quot; respect of bringing out the first edition in the hope that he<br /> and the cost of his establishment to be con. would be repaid the expense of the first by the sale of the<br /> sidered? And why are not the bookseller&#039;s inci.<br /> second and subsequent editions, and to hold the author at<br /> his own instance to be at liberty to put an end to the agree-<br /> dental expenses and the cost of his establishment<br /> ment after the first edition had been published, would be to<br /> to be considered ? And why do not solicitors, enable him, by an arbitrary and unreasonable exercise of<br /> medical men, and professional men of all kinds that power, to deprive the publisher of all his profits. On<br /> charge for their establishments ? The history the contrary, it might be contended, on behalf of the<br /> of the half-profit system is simply this : It meant,<br /> anthor, that unless he was empowered to terminate the<br /> contract, he might be under an obligation to the publisher<br /> at first, the honest deduction from proceeds of<br /> during the whole of the latter&#039;s life, while the publisher<br /> actual cost and money expended. The publisher would be under no reciprocal obligation to bim. The former<br /> then began to filch and to steal : he said he had could also prevent the author from publishing a single copy<br /> spent £20 when he had only spent £15, and so on.<br /> of the treatise so long as the publisher expressed his readi.<br /> ness to continue publishing. The author, however, would<br /> Then he began to rob on a system of adding so<br /> bave no reciprocal power, and could not compel the pab.<br /> much per cent.—saying nothing about it. Of<br /> lisher to publish more than a single edition of the book.<br /> course he has no right to any such profit any The latter, moreover, in the bona fide exercise of his discre.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 33 (#55) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 33<br /> tion as to the proper time and mode of publication, might twelve. Aboat £150 was spent by the plaintiffs in adver.<br /> decline indefinitely to publish, but without giving up his tising the book, and more than 40,000 copies of it were sold.<br /> agreement, while the author, at the same time, might be of As, however, Mrs. Cook became offended with the plaintiffs<br /> an opposite opinion, yet for months, and even years, might for describing the book as a companion work of their series,<br /> be kept in suspense, and probibited from publishing on his she gave them notice to put an end to the contract with<br /> own account, until the publisher thought that the time had them, and entered into an agreement for the issue of a<br /> arrived for the revival of the public interest in the book. revised edition of the book with Messrs. Routledge. It was<br /> Under such circumstances, this learned judge thought the firstly maintained by the plaintiffs that their agreement<br /> position of the author to be one of so great hardship and with Mrs. Cook amounted to a sale of the copyright; but,<br /> difficulty, that anless it was clearly proved to have been at the hearing of the case, they merely moved for an injunc.<br /> contemplated by both the contracting parties it should not tion to restrain the farther publication of the book as long<br /> be enforced.<br /> as any copies printed by them before the receipt of the<br /> notice were unsold. The injunction, however, was not<br /> On a royalty system we have advanced so much<br /> granted, and the plaintiffs&#039; bill of complaint was dismissed<br /> that Mr. Porter&#039;s remarks need not be quoted. with costs. The verbal agreement referred to was 28<br /> follows, according to the statement of Mr. Warne, mentioned<br /> THE COMMISSION SYSTEM.<br /> by the Master of the Rolls in his judgment, viz. : “I,&quot; said<br /> Mr. Warne, &quot;offered a royalty of a penny a copy on all<br /> On the commission system he says that profits copies sold, counting thirteen copies as twelve ; to which<br /> -i.e., secret profits-on the cost of production<br /> she replied, I have a speculative turn of mind, and will<br /> are reasonable. Surely when a man agrees<br /> take the penny.&#039; To this I consented.” This is all the con-<br /> versation that occurred, and is the evidence upon which the<br /> to act as agent for another man, and to sell<br /> agreement is based. It is to be hoped that this case will<br /> his wares for a fixed percentage, to take secretly be &amp; warning to authors and publishers against entering<br /> another kind of percentage is pure swindling and into a mere verbal arrangement for publication. It is oppor.<br /> cheating. Mr. Porter does not seem to under. tane to remark concerning this point that, if &amp; contract<br /> stand this. Very few people did thirteen years<br /> between an author and publisher is one that cannot be per.<br /> formed within a year after being made, no legal action is<br /> ago. His words, however, on vouchers show his<br /> maintainable upon it for its enforcement, unless the agree-<br /> desire to present the subject fairly :-<br /> ment, or some memorandum or note of such, is in writing,<br /> The commission publisher is under the same legal obliga-<br /> and signed by the person to be charged therewith. It is<br /> tion to show his accounts and vouchers on demand by the<br /> not necessary, however, for this purpose that the agreement<br /> author, as the half-profit system publisher is bound to show<br /> should be in one document. It may be collected from many<br /> them to his author, as the former publisher is the author&#039;s<br /> papers if they are clearly connected, and do not reqaire<br /> agent.<br /> parol testimony to maintain the connection, as such<br /> evidence is inadmissible for that object.<br /> On the subject of &quot;risk” he has been led<br /> The rest of the paper is devoted to speculation<br /> astray, as so many used to be, by a confusion of<br /> as to the future of the Society. The writer thinks<br /> thought. Those who wrote on one side used,<br /> that authors will rather go to their solicitors than<br /> and still use, the word “ risk” to signify danger<br /> to a committee of authors, still under the supposi-<br /> of loss; the publishers confused the minds of<br /> tion that the Committee will themselves attempt<br /> people by meaning chance of not making great<br /> lawyers&#039; work. He also thinks that publishers<br /> profits. There are hundreds of writers, taking all<br /> will refuse to treat with authors who send agree-<br /> the branches, whose books carry no kind of risk-<br /> ments to the Society, forgetting that if one<br /> i.e., they are quite certain to be sold up to a<br /> publisher puts his dignity before his business<br /> number which will pay all expenses and leave a another man will reverse the operation.<br /> reasonable margin. There are not many books<br /> which are certain to sell in large quantities. That<br /> THEN AND Now.<br /> is as true to-day, when the demand for books has The Society proposed at the outset to recom-<br /> so greatly increased, as it was thirteen years ago. mend authors to houses where they would be safe<br /> -or comparatively safe. It is objected that<br /> THE NEED FOR AGREEMENTS.<br /> experienced authors will not need the advice of<br /> the Society, and that inexperienced authors will<br /> As to the folly of not looking after agreements,<br /> find the publishers unwilling to publish in the<br /> Mr. Porter adduced a remarkable case :-<br /> mode recommended by the Society.<br /> A notewortby instance of this was stated in the case of<br /> Now, during the whole period of its existence,<br /> Warne v. Routledge, adjadicated upon by Sir George Jessel,<br /> Master of the Rolls, in Jane, 1874. In this instance, Mrs.<br /> the Society has steadily kept its members out of<br /> Milicent Cook wrote a book called “How to Dress on £15 certain publishers’ hands. . Authors experienced<br /> a Year as a Lady, by a Lady,&quot; and entered into a verbal and authors inexperienced use the Society for<br /> contract with Messrs. Warne and Co. that they should information and for advice : they come to the<br /> pablish the work anonymously, and incur all expenses<br /> Society when they are in difficulties. They get<br /> directly and indirectly connected therewith, and that each<br /> copy should be published at one shilling, and that the plain.<br /> a legal opinion for nothing, and that of a kind<br /> tiffs were to remunerate her by a royalty of one penny for which requires special knowledge which their own<br /> each copy sold. The copies were to be rookoned thirteen as solicitors could not give them.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 34 (#56) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 34<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> boys.<br /> The failure of these forebodings is instructive Straightforward copying, duplicating, &amp;c., are<br /> and interesting.<br /> still fairly easy to obtain, but the ever increasing<br /> The writer acknowledges at the end of his paper army of &quot; pocket-money ” workers who can afford<br /> that the Society may have a great future before to undersell their work makes it increasingly<br /> it. Yet he does not understand the greatness of difficult for a copyist to earn a living wage.<br /> that future.<br /> Some of us have to earn our own living by our<br /> One point he advances which seems worth con. own unaided efforts, and some of us would gladly<br /> sidering, but is not. He thinks that the Society earn it by less mechanical means—by making our<br /> might point out methods of literary training for machines the handmaids of our intellect, and by<br /> the higher class of instructive literary work. The placing our capacities of mind at the service of<br /> only method of literary training for this higher those who write. A BOOK-LOVING TYPIST.<br /> class of work is a full mind. A writer in order<br /> to be instructive must be himself a scholar and a<br /> student in his subject. Toe rest can be learned<br /> II.-CONCERNING BOOKS FOR Boys.<br /> by any work on rhetoric which will point out the The piece which you print in your June number<br /> meaning of arrangement and order, attention to under this heading is useful, as a good example of<br /> the marshalling of facts and an endeavour to aim the prevalent opinion with regard to books for<br /> at the charm of style and language.<br /> ** Any trash will do,&quot; says the writer in the<br /> Guardian from whose article you have quoted,<br /> and this sentiment is apparently indorsed by<br /> CORRESPONDENCE.<br /> publishers and reviewers. The very manner in<br /> which the “ gift book” makes its annual appear-<br /> I.-AUXILIARY LITERARY WORK.<br /> ance on the market is sufficient to rank it as some.<br /> CAY I draw your attention to a branch of thing equal in value to Christmas crackers and<br /> auxiliary literary work, i.e., typewriting candied fruit.<br /> in combination with what, for want of The pay for this class of work is miserably<br /> a better term, I must call secretarial duties? The poor; the reason, I am told, being the large dis-<br /> question for the educated typist who aspires to be count which the publisher has to give to the book.<br /> something more than part of ber machine is, How seller, while the reviewing is altogether a farce,<br /> may such work be obtained ?<br /> the “ innocents&quot; being slaughtered in batches of<br /> It is depressing to read lists of historical, from thirty to forty in a single column. When<br /> biographical, and educational books, and to a longer“ notice&quot; is given, it is often worse<br /> realise that all of them have entailed a consider than none at all. I have been severely lectured<br /> able amount of auxiliary work-such as copying for “ preaching a sermon on horse-racing,&quot; when<br /> and arranging notes, epitomes of documents, and the book in question contained no mention what.<br /> sorting masses of information, in addition to the ever of this kind of sport-a clear proof that the<br /> more mechanical work of copying the finished “reviewer” had got the contents of several<br /> MSS.<br /> volumes mixed up in his head before setting to<br /> A busy author must often need the services of work.<br /> an efficient helper at some stage of the prepara- The assertion made by “R. F. C.” that boys<br /> tion of his works, and he must need one who has read a sto y of school life simply to enjoy the<br /> had experience and who is endued with a sense of discomfiture of a comic schoolmaster is a mis-<br /> literary form. There can be no doubt that chievous statement, the untruth of which I, or<br /> supply and demand both exist; but how may any writer of similar experience, can prove by<br /> they be brought into contact ? I have ceased to letters received from readers ; but when our books<br /> believe in advertisement as a means of procuring are bought as rubbish, sold as rubbish, and re-<br /> either permanent or temporary appointments; as viewed as rubbish, it is perhaps natural for anyone<br /> an instance, mine has appeared in The Author for to suppose that they are read and written in the<br /> three montbs without eliciting a single reply. same spirit.<br /> Perhaps this is not surprising, for the capacities It may, however, surprise “ R. F. C.” to learn<br /> of an advertiser are, after all, merely a matter of that there are men and women who regard the<br /> conjecture.<br /> weaving of stories calculated to influence the<br /> Is there any hope for the typist (and there impressionable mind of a child as a branch of the<br /> must be many of them) who has not the necessary literary calling as honourable as that of the sensa-<br /> capacity for original literary work, but who fortional novelist or newspaper hack.<br /> love of books would fain have a place in the To write successfully for the young is an art<br /> humbler rauks of literature ?<br /> requiring special gifts and methods; an art which,<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 35 (#57) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 35<br /> though at present ignored, will in time receive character-study, and every word that Miss Dora<br /> due recognition and reward, but which is not Russell could give me. When nothing was<br /> likely to derive either assistance or encouragement forthcoming, and at the request, in writing, of<br /> from the penning of articles such as the one to the lady&#039;s sisters, I did the best I could. I looked<br /> which you have referred.<br /> day after day for improvement. There even<br /> A WRITER FOR Boys. came to be some hope; but, unbappily, it never<br /> arrived at fruition. May I, then, ask at what<br /> precise point should I have stopped supply, and<br /> III.—ROYALTIES.<br /> by announcing that the novel could not proceed<br /> When consulting the “ Tables of Royalties ” in ended all? It has been stated that sentiment of<br /> “ The Literary Year Book” for 1900, I was sur that sort should not have prevented the enlighten-<br /> prised to see that they only mention royalties ment of the public. But the syndicate was<br /> varying from 2 to 15 per cent. Was this writing its congratulations on an improvement<br /> curious table composed with the view of throwing which was being evidenced hy “the manner in<br /> dust into the eyes of inexperienced authors by which you and Colonel Craig are finishing the<br /> making them believe that 27 was a reasonable story.&quot;&#039; Whose part was it to announce that a<br /> royalty and 15 per cent. the utmost limit of work so satisfactorily proceeding-even in the<br /> generosity ? I notice that the book is the pro- opinion of the syndicate which had had a<br /> perty of a publisher, and perhaps that accounts monopoly of the authoress&#039;s work for years-had<br /> for the milk in the cocoanut. GLENFRUIN. now become one of unavoidable collaboration.<br /> Not mine, surely.<br /> The serial issue began on Oct. I, 1897, as “ A<br /> IV.-AUTHOR AND PUBLISHER.<br /> New and Exciting Story! By that Talented and<br /> With reference to “ A. Penn-Wyper&#039;s&quot; commu- Popular Authoress, Dora Russell.” Of this<br /> nication in the June number, I cannot suppose description I, of course, knew nothing, for I had<br /> there would be any difficulty in forming a joiut never been consulted about the publication of the<br /> committee to which a publisher and an author tale. I had not even heard of the issue having<br /> would be mutually willing to submit the question commenced until several weeks after the date<br /> of terms, in cases where the publisher was desirous given. When I at last asked for the names of<br /> to publish a work and the author was willing that the papers in which the novel was appearing, I<br /> he should do so. They could both state their got this somewhat curt answer from the syndi-<br /> respective cases in writing, and their willingness cate: “It is a rule of our office not to supply<br /> to abide by the decision given. It would secure to such information as you ask for.”<br /> both the effective representation of their interests. The question has been put: How far did I<br /> T. L.<br /> acquiesce in the issue of the novel under the<br /> name of the popular authoress? I answer: only<br /> V.—“A TORN-Out PAGE,” “BY” Dora RUSSELL. in so far as I did not take legal action to prevent<br /> It having become an item of general informa- it, or render myself liable to prosecution for<br /> tion, froin a review which appeared in Vanity calumnious publication. But forbidding the<br /> Fair of April 19, that the above novel could not issue by injunction would have been, first,<br /> have been the unassisted work of the popular impossible, in my circumstances; secondly, unfair<br /> novelist, I have had to assume all responsibility, to Dora Russell, who, after all, had actually<br /> moral and literary, for the fact that every word written some thirty-three thousand words of the<br /> on the concluding 239 pages was wholly mine. novel with her own hand; and thirdly, a stulti-<br /> The letter proposing the scheme to the syndicate fication of myself, who, to help her, had written<br /> was penned with her own hand. My undertaking the remainder. What I felt called upon to do<br /> the task had the warm approval in writing of her was to satisfy the syndicate with the work. As<br /> family. Every instalment as written by me was to duty to the public, that body had for weeks<br /> read aloud to the authoress in the presence of her been assured that the novel was “by” the popular<br /> sisters, except the concluding two.<br /> writer before I had even come to know that the<br /> When I wrote to the syndicate indorsing Miss clients of the syndicate “would acquire it.” And<br /> Dora Russell&#039;s statement of my willingness to “by” Miss Dora Russell the novel actually was,<br /> finish the novel as a help to her, I plainly made up to just about that time. Had I a right to<br /> my doing so conditional upon “the scheme being assume that the syndicate&#039;s clients would be<br /> announced to your readers as you” (the syndicate allowed to go on from that point, issuing the tale<br /> “ may deem fit.” Taking up the authoress&#039;s without the announcement which I had demanded?<br /> characters and incidents as I found them, I was As Vanity Fair says: “ Explanation of the<br /> absolutely resolved to use every plot, every facts should have been made, as could easily<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 36 (#58) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 36<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> have been done by a few words of preface, or by be true, I seem to have been badly treated. If<br /> Colonel Craig&#039;s name as joint author.” I hold their “ belief,&quot; on the contrary, be even mode-<br /> that I could not, by anticipation, charge the rately justified by the quality (such as it is) of<br /> syndicate with the intention of continuing to the writing, I must have produced a fairly suc-<br /> publish the novel from the point at which the cessful imitation (which should have been an-<br /> work came to be mine (i.e., from p. 110) without nounced as such) of a certain class of popular<br /> the announcement for which I had stipulated fiction, for which they have found a place.<br /> expressly from the first. Am I to suppose that Either way, I hope, Sir, that you will find some<br /> if I had received, and made use of, a letter of of the “ literary interest” so dear to T&#039;he Author<br /> thanks and commendation from the syndicate for in my statement of the matter.<br /> my part of the work I should have been chargeable<br /> R. MANIFOLD CRAIG.<br /> with condonation and “acquiescence” past all 3, Harcourt-buildings,<br /> pardon ?<br /> The Temple, E.C.<br /> I have come to know that the syndicate and a [Colonel Craig&#039;s case is not one in which any<br /> London publisher have announced their belief question of legal liability arises. It presents,<br /> that the authoress wrote every word of “A Torn. however, some features of literary interest, and<br /> out Page.” Very well. Let us courteously assume the Committee have thougbt it right to give<br /> that, after the fullest inquiry in every direction Colonel Craig this opportunity of stating his<br /> except mine, they considered they had adequate view. 7<br /> grounds for that belief. But I have at this<br /> moment in my possession most of the typewritten<br /> sheets, bearing proofs of being those from which<br /> BOOK AND PLAY TALK.<br /> my part of the work was set up. I allege that I<br /> typed them in my own residence, directly upon COLUMNS of book announcements are very<br /> my typewriter ; and that Miss Dora Russell I thin at present, as it is too early yet for the<br /> was never in my home, and never saw my type-<br /> autumn lists. One of the important books<br /> writer. Is the belief of the syndicate and the then will be the biography of Professor Huxley,<br /> publisher compatible with the veracity of that which his son is writing and which Messrs. Mac-<br /> allegation? These sheets came back to me in the millan will publish. Mr. P. A. Chalmers Mitchell<br /> ordinary course of proof-correction. I allege is carrying out a long-standing engagement with<br /> that they and their fellows constituted the only Messrs. Putnam for a book on Huxley, while Mr.<br /> “copy&quot; of the story which was in existence at Edward Clodd is writing a volume on the same<br /> the time of the serial publication. Can that subject for Messrs. Blackwood&#039;s “Modern English<br /> statement be refuted ? Again, I have it under Writers &quot; series. Another volume in this series<br /> the hand of the syndicate that there had been no will be on George Eliot, by Mr. Sidney Lee, whose<br /> &quot;copy&quot; from the authoress for months, and that services in connection with the now completed<br /> she was far over two years in arrears with her “ Dictionary of National Biography” have just<br /> work. Suddenly, directly upon the acceptance of been commemorated by a presentation of plate<br /> my categorical offer to “finish &quot; the novel, typo- made to him in the name of the contributors to<br /> script copy begins to flow in at the rate of that monumental work.<br /> - 15,000 to 20,000 words per week. Am I, in my<br /> Mr. Justin McCarthy is finishing his “ History<br /> courteous effort to believe in the belief of the<br /> of the Four Georges,” and contemplates writing a<br /> syndicate, to opine that that circumstance did not<br /> novel on Ireland as he knew it in his youth.<br /> strike them, or seem other than matter of course ?<br /> I am entirely content that my whole case shall be<br /> When Mr. B. L. Farjeon&#039;s new novel, “ The<br /> read in the light of the declared belief of the<br /> Mesmerists,” is published by Messrs. Hutchinson,<br /> syndicate and the publisher. Surely, they can<br /> the volume will be found to contain also a<br /> have no objection.<br /> dramatic version of the story. This is the first<br /> I hold a statement of the syndicate that their<br /> time, we believe, that the two have been com-<br /> clients “ bad perceived the distinction between”<br /> bined in one volume. The object is to safeguard<br /> the authoress&#039;s work and mine. I answer that<br /> the author against unauthorised stage versions of<br /> with another statement from the same gentlemen.<br /> his novel.<br /> They say I have deceived them-palming as The Hon. W. H. Lyttleton is writing on “Out-<br /> collaborated work matter which was entirely my Door Games” for Messrs. Dent&#039;s “ Haddon<br /> own. Now, I claim that all this is matter of Hall Library.&quot; His work will be in two volumes,<br /> literary interest; and surely the syndicate is at and in the first cricket and golf will be treated.<br /> liberty to decide which is their real opinion. But “Hunting,” by Mr. Otho Paget, is another pro-<br /> they cannot have it both ways. If what I allege spective volume in the series, but before either<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 37 (#59) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 37<br /> of these there will be published “Our Forests and all times takes extreme pains in revising his<br /> and Woodlands,” by Dr. John Nisbet, who pleads writings, is re-writing part of “Evelyn Innes.”<br /> for more support from the State to enable land.<br /> Mr. William Le Queux calls his forthcoming<br /> owners to form plantations on poor lands and<br /> waste tracts.<br /> story “ An Eye for an Eye,” and the publishers<br /> of Anthony Trollope&#039;s works (which, by the way,<br /> An important scheme for the foundation of an<br /> continue to find a good sale) have formally per-<br /> international association of the principal scientific mitted the use of this title. On the subject of<br /> and literary academies of the world is reported by duplicate titles, Mrs. Roy Devereux has been<br /> the London correspondent of the Manchester writing in the Academy with reference to her<br /> Guardian. It provides for the division of the book, «Sidelights on South Africa,” having been<br /> association into two sections, “scientific ” and followed in a few months by one by Lady Sykes,<br /> “ literary” respectively, and is the outcome of a entitled “Sidelights on the War in South Africa.&quot;<br /> meeting of the representatives of the chief Euro. Mrs. Roy Devereux states that several cases have<br /> pean and American academies held at Wiesbaden been reported to her in which readers who asked<br /> in October last. “The Royal Society, which has for her book were supplied with that of Lady<br /> taken a leading part in the promotion of the Sykes.<br /> scheme, will naturally represent this country in<br /> Among the newer guide-books “ Paris in its<br /> the scientific section, and steps are being taken<br /> with a view to securing an adequate representa-<br /> Splendour,&quot; by Eustace A. Reynolds-Ball, must<br /> tion in the second section.”<br /> *be mentioned. It is a popular study of Paris<br /> past and present, historic and picturesque. It is<br /> Mr. Charles Neufeld, the “prisoner of the illustrated by sixty studies in photogravure, and<br /> Khalifa,” is writing a story of adventure for<br /> it contains 580 pages, in two volumes priced at<br /> boys, based on his experiences in Egypt.<br /> one guinea, and published by Dana Estes and Co.,<br /> Mr. Walter Winans is writing a book-an Boston.<br /> édition de luxe—on the art of revolver shooting, “The Mystic Number 7,” by Annabel Gray,<br /> which will be published by Messrs. Putnam. the publication of which was delayed on account<br /> Mr. Cutcliffe Hyne&#039;s letter to The Author of the war, is now at all the libraries and pub-<br /> suggesting to novelists to combine in producing a<br /> lished by Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall and Co.<br /> book which should be sold on behalf of the War Mr. Thomas Cobb bas in the press a novel<br /> Fund has come to fruition. The volume is entitled “ Severance,&quot; which will be published by<br /> entitled “ For Britain&#039;s Soldiers,&quot; and contains Mr. John Lane. He has also almost ready “ The<br /> stories by Mrs. Croker, Mr. W. L. Alden, Sir Bountiful Lady,&quot; to appear as one of Mr. Grant<br /> Walter Besant, Mr. Crockett, Mr. Hornung, Mr. . Richards&#039;s “ Dumpy Books for Children.” “The<br /> Hyne, Mr. Kipling, Mr. Mason, Mr. Moore, Mr. Dissemblers,&quot; from the same pen, will form a part<br /> Pemberton, Mr. Roberts, Mr. Ridge, Mr. Wells, of Lippincott&#039;s Magazine for September.<br /> Mr. White, and Mr. Wood. It will be published<br /> immediately by Messrs. Methuen, whose services<br /> H.R.H. The Prince of Wales has accepted a<br /> copy of the “Handbook to Christian and Eccle-<br /> also are given by way of a contribution to the<br /> siastical Rome”-third volume, “Monasticism, and<br /> same patriotic cause.<br /> Ecclesiastical Rome” (A. and C. Black), by<br /> Sir George Trevelyan is editing the diary of M. A. R. Tuker and Hope Malleson. Part 4<br /> Lord Macaulay.<br /> (Monasticism) contains an account of the order<br /> Mr. Maurice Hewlett&#039;s new novel is to be called of St. John of Jerusalem, of which H.R.H. is<br /> “ Richard Yea and Nay.”<br /> Grand Prior in England and of which the first-<br /> Sir Walter Besant&#039;s new novel is entitled named author is a member.<br /> “The Fourth Generation.” After appearing as a Among many articles and stories of special<br /> serial it has been partly rewritten and enlarged interest to be published in the August issue of<br /> for publication in book form in September or The Argosy, a short story is included from the<br /> October.<br /> pen of the late Mr. Stephen Crane.<br /> Mr. Neil Munro is writing a new novel, which The first thing which the author of “ To Have<br /> will be published by Messrs. Blackwood, but will and to Hold” ever wrote for publication is said<br /> not run serially.<br /> to have been a little account of a roadside meeting<br /> Mr. George Moore&#039;s new story will be called with Queen Victoria in the south of France.<br /> “Sister Teresa,&quot; and it will have a certain connec- Professor Owen Edwards has completed his<br /> tion with his last work, “Evelyn Innes.” The volume on Wales for “ The Story of the Nations&quot;<br /> chief subject is convent life. Mr. Moore, who at series.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 38 (#60) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 38<br /> * THE AUTHOR.<br /> Mr. Herman Merivale has been granted a Civil<br /> List pension.<br /> “The Casino Girl,&quot; a comic opera, written by<br /> Mr. Harry B. Smith, and composed by Mr.<br /> Ludwig Englander, is the American “success&quot;<br /> which is now taking the place of “An American<br /> Beauty” at the Shaftesbury. The scene is laid<br /> in Egypt, and one of the characters represents<br /> the Khedive. The title róle is held by Miss<br /> Mabelle Gilman, a singer and dancer whom<br /> London sees for the first time.<br /> Miss Julia Neilson&#039;s season at the Haymarket<br /> will open on Aug. 30, when she and Mr. William<br /> Mollison will produce “Mistress Nell Gwynne,&quot;<br /> a new play by Paul Koster. The part of<br /> Charles II. will be taken by Mr. Fred Terry.<br /> A new play called “The Great Philanthropist,&quot;<br /> by Miss Gertrude Warden and the late Mr.<br /> Wilton Jones, will be produced at the Strand on<br /> July 16, by way of celebrating Mr. Sidney<br /> Alport&#039;s return from Australia. Miss Kate<br /> Rorke and Mr. Abingdon will be in the cast.<br /> The “ Pirates of Penzance&quot; is being revived<br /> at the Savoy.<br /> Mrs. Patrick Campbell will produce in the<br /> autumn an adaptation of Echegary&#039;s play, trans-<br /> lated by Mr. J. M. Graham, and adapted by Mr.<br /> Arthur Symons, entitled “Mariana.”<br /> Mr. Robert Marshall has written a play for<br /> Mr. Frederick Harrison and Mr. Cyril Maude.<br /> It will touch the events of the South African<br /> war.<br /> of one of the most remarkable figures of the day.”<br /> “ Interesting and historically important,” is the Daily<br /> Telegraph&#039;s opinion of the speeches. The Daily News says<br /> “ Vindex” is obviously an admirer of Mr. Rhodes, but &quot; the<br /> book should be equally welcome to those who do not and<br /> those who do share his admiration.”<br /> THE GENTLEMAN PENSIONER, by Albert Lee (Pearson,<br /> 68.), is a bistorical romance dealing with the rising of the<br /> Nortbern Lords in Elizabeth&#039;s days. The Spectator says :<br /> “Mr. Lee cleverly varies the adventures, and his story is<br /> something more than readable.” British Weekly describes<br /> it as “a powerful and abeorbing story, full of delicate<br /> writing, without weakness or a touch of affectation . . .<br /> a really excellent bit of historic fiction. Graphic says:<br /> “Mr. Lee has made the most of his study of bulldog<br /> tenacity and fidelity.” Scotsman describes the story as “ a<br /> very successful attempt to deal with an interesting episode<br /> in English history.&quot; The World: “Those who enjoy<br /> historical romance will find this an excellent specimen of<br /> the class to which it belongs.&quot;<br /> HISTORY OF EPIC POETRY, by John Clark (Oliver and<br /> Boyd, Edinburgh, 58.), is referred to by the Spectator as<br /> &quot;a very instructive volume, especially in respect of various<br /> poems wbich are often spoken of, but very seldom read. Mr.<br /> Clark has had the patience to deal with Valerius Flaccus<br /> and Statius, and, what is a far greater achievement, Silius<br /> Italicas himself.” “He limits his subject on his title-page<br /> to .post-Virgilian,&#039; bat he has something to say about both<br /> Homer and Virgil that is worth reading. The defence of<br /> Virgil, in particular, is distinctly able. The book, as a<br /> whole, is an addition of value to the literature of criticism.&quot;<br /> CHARLES HENRY PEARSON, Fellow of Oriel and Educa.<br /> tion Minister in Victoria : Memorials by Himself, his Wife,<br /> and his Friends, edited by William Stebbing (Longmans,<br /> 148.), “ one of the most interesting of recent biographies”<br /> (Literature), is a “deeply interesting work,&quot; says the<br /> Spectator; it “supplies a want, and we are grateful to Mrs.<br /> Pearson and to Mr. Stebbing for presenting us with a true<br /> portrait of Charles Henry Pearson.” The Daily Chronicle<br /> (Hon. Alfred Deakin) says the volume will leave the reader<br /> with “ a profound admiration” for the man it commemo.<br /> rates.<br /> A HISTORY OF GREECE, by Evelyn Abbott, M.A., LL.D.<br /> (Longmans, 108. 6d.). Part III. : From the Thirty Years&#039;<br /> Peace to the Fall of the Thirty at Athens, 445.403, B.C.<br /> “ The first volume of Dr. Abbott&#039;s History was published<br /> in 1888, and another volume is wanting to complete the<br /> purpose ; 80 that we have here,&quot; says the Spectator, “a<br /> leisurely, well-considered work, which has occupied the<br /> better part of two decades. The author&#039;s aim is to provide<br /> a history in moderate compass dealing with broad lines of<br /> development rather than minuto archeological questions.<br /> It is a book of a different class from Holm&#039;s brilliant work ;<br /> for one thing, it considers the great texts more in detail,<br /> giving four volumes to his two. .. It is free from<br /> the wordy platitudes of Curtius, and it is fairer and more<br /> scientific than the many volumes of Grote and Thirlwall.<br /> In certain ways it resembles Beloch&#039;s compendium, but it<br /> has many qualities of its own. It is extremely readable,<br /> and in the simple, anrhetorical style there is often a genuine<br /> enthusiasm and appreciation.”<br /> THINGS SEEN : IMPRESSIONS OF MEN, CITIES, AND<br /> Books, by G. W. Steevens, collected and edited by G. S.<br /> Street, with a memoir by W. E. Henley (Blackwood, 58.).<br /> “Quite apart from the tragic circumstances of Mr.<br /> Steevens&#039;s death,” says the Spectator, “the energy and<br /> versatility displayed in the aureum quinquennium which<br /> succeeded an exceptionally brilliant academic career, and<br /> BOOKS AND REVIEWS.<br /> (In these columns notes on books are given from reviews<br /> which carry weight, and are not, so far as can be learned,<br /> logrollers.)<br /> GRANT ALLEN, A Memoir, by Edward Clodd (Richards,<br /> 68.) is, says the Daily Chronicle, &quot;authoritative in many<br /> ways. It has the authority of a long and intimate friend.<br /> ship with its subject; it has, too, the authority of kinship<br /> in studies pursued in much the same spirit, and certainly to<br /> similar conclusions.” “Mr. Clodd does a real service to his<br /> friend&#039;s memory in publishing letters which show how the<br /> very makers of evolutionary sciences regarded Grant Allen.&quot;<br /> The book also contains some of Grant Allen&#039;s letters,<br /> though he was “not a great writer of letters,&quot; and two of the<br /> dearest of his friends “add greatly to the value” of the<br /> book by “vividly-written reminiscences : Miss Alice Bird<br /> and Professor York Powell.”<br /> CECIL RHODES, by Vindex (Chapman, 128. net), is &amp;<br /> collection of speeches made by Mr. Rhodes from 1881 to<br /> the present year. The Times says these give“ an extremely<br /> interesting view ” of the development of contemporary<br /> history in South Africa, with “characteristic bits of self-<br /> revelation which, when the speeches are read together as a<br /> whole, leave a tolerably vivid impression of the personality<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 39 (#61) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 39<br /> the charm of his personality, the pablication of these stray<br /> papers, edited by two intimate friends, is entirely justified<br /> by their intrinsic merits.&quot;<br /> THE EVOLUTION OF THE ENGLISH NOVEL, by Professor<br /> Francis Hovey Stoddard (of New York University) (Mac-<br /> millan, 68.), is praised by the Daily Chronicle as “ not only<br /> well-written and well-informed, but also marked throughout<br /> by measured judgment, proportion, and a certain dignity of<br /> attitude and expression.” The Daily News calls it &quot;an<br /> interesting book on a pleasant sabject.”<br /> DRIFT, by Horatio F. Brown (Richards, 58. net), is a<br /> volume of poems. The Spectator says that &quot; what strikes<br /> the reader most in Mr. Brown&#039;s verse is his feeling for and<br /> power of transmitting the charm of natural scenery. His<br /> verse is full of rhythm and shows a nice and scholarly use<br /> of language, bat beyond this there is what we may term an<br /> hieracchic knowledge of invoking the genius loci, whether<br /> he is dealing with England, Switzerland, or Italy. ..<br /> The glimpses we get of hedgerows, of pine-clad mountain<br /> slopes, or of windy wastes of inland waters are generally<br /> incidental and unpremeditated.&#039;<br /> THE ART AND CRAFT OF GARDEN MAKING, by Thomas<br /> H. Mawson (Batsford, 218.), is not only “excellent to read and<br /> look at—the pictures with which it is embellished are without<br /> exception delightful—but it is,” says the Spectator, “full of<br /> practical suggestions for those who wish to lay out a<br /> beautiful garden.” “Just at first,&quot; says Literature, “ the<br /> beauty of the designs and the great charm of Mr. Chamber-<br /> lain&#039;s chapter-headings threaten to deflect the mind of the<br /> reader from the wise things in the text, but this is only at<br /> first.” The Times says “Mr. Mawson has plenty of ideas<br /> and a very pretty taste&quot;; and the Daily Chronicle is equally<br /> appreciative.<br /> VILLAGE NOTES, by Pamela Tennant (Heinemann, 6s.),<br /> bas, says the Daily Telegraph, &quot;all the charm of the quaint<br /> and primitive country she describes--South Wiltshire,<br /> with its patient, slow-witted, but intelligent rustics, and<br /> its rare provincialisms of speech.” “ It is pleasant,” says<br /> the Daily Chronicle, &quot; to those loving Nature, who yet do<br /> not write about her, to find her approached in such a manner<br /> as Mrs. Tennant&#039;s.”<br /> NATURE IN DOWNLAND, by W. H. Hadson (Longman,<br /> 108. 6d.), is described by Literature as &quot;a guidebook in the<br /> sense that it reveals to you not the most interesting spots<br /> and the exact turnings to take in reaching them, but the<br /> trae beauty of the Sussex Downs, and the charm of the<br /> human and of the wild life which inhabits them.”<br /> HIGHWAYS AND BYWAYS IN NORMANDY, by Percy<br /> Doarmer, with illustrations by Joseph Pennell (Macmillan,<br /> 68.), leads the Daily Chronicle to say : “If not too soon to<br /> think of summer holidays, here is a book to send the fancy<br /> toward a very pleasant land of travel.” Literature says it<br /> “ will take a high place” in Messrs. Macmillan&#039;s series of<br /> guide books, while the Spectator advises &quot;all travellers in<br /> Normandy, and especially all cyclists,” to read Mr.<br /> Dearmer&#039;s book before they leave England.<br /> TALKS WITH OLD ENGLISH CRICKETERS, by A. W.<br /> Pullin (&quot; Old Ebor&quot;) (Blackwood, 68.), “is crammed with<br /> matter of the greatest interest to all who take delight in<br /> the game and the lore of cricket.&quot; Among the veterans<br /> with whom the reader is able to talk familiarly are V. E.<br /> Walker and Richard Daft.<br /> TRAVELS IN ENGLAND, by Richard Le Gallienne<br /> (Richards, 68.), is “peripatetic prose,” in the language of<br /> the Daily Chronicle, which thanks the bicycle &quot; for having<br /> taken Mr. Le Gallienne on a roving tour through the green<br /> places of England, odorous with the memory of sweet<br /> names.” “Mr. Le Gallienne is peculiarly rich in suggestion,<br /> and as a &#039; Voyage autour de ma chambre&#039; may be more<br /> interesting than a journey to the moon, so are these<br /> desultory rides on a bicycle quite independent for their<br /> interest of the ground covered.”<br /> &quot;A PEEP INTO Punch,” by J. Holt Schooling (Newnes,<br /> 58.), is the “Story of Punch, with illustrations by Himself.&quot;<br /> * Altogether,” says the Spectator, “this is a delightfully<br /> amusing book by one who knows his subject.” The Daily<br /> Chronicle describes it as excellent for a lazy summer day.<br /> · THE HOUSING QUESTION, by Alfred Smith, late<br /> Chairman of the Housing Committee, L.C.C.(Swan Sonnen-<br /> schein). “Mr. Smith,” says the Guardian, “writes as<br /> an expert and with the authority of one. This little book<br /> contains an admirably clear statement of all the aspects of<br /> housing the poor so far as that question affects London ;<br /> and, though other towns suffer from the evils of overcrowding,<br /> London suffers from them to a degree and extent which no<br /> other city can approach. The second section sets out in an<br /> impressive form the vast dimensions which this evil has -<br /> attained in London.”<br /> LOVE AND MR. LEWISHAM, by H. G. Wells (Harper,<br /> 68.), will be considered by many, says the Daily Telegraph,<br /> “the most fascinating piece of work he has done.&quot; Mr.<br /> Wells portrays the life of the fifth-rate assistant master.<br /> “It is wonderfully well done,” says the Daily Chronicle.<br /> “The descriptive pages are charming, the dialogue real and<br /> bright.” “The element of irresponsible gaiety which<br /> animated “The Wheels of Chance,&#039;” says the Spectator, “ is<br /> here replaced by a more consistently serious outlook on the<br /> struggle for existence that goes on in the humbler ranks of<br /> the teaching profession.” “The bandful of vivid human<br /> figures belong,” says Literature, “ to a great extent, to the<br /> world of South Kensington students, and into that often<br /> purposeless and sordid background Mr. Wells weaves the<br /> poetry of life and the beauty of human love.&quot;<br /> JAN OXBER, by Orme Agnas (Ward, Look, and Co.,<br /> 38. 6d.), is a series of stories dealing with West of<br /> England villagers. Mr. Agous, says the Daily Telegraph,<br /> “has achieved a remarkable task in reproducing not only<br /> the superficial life of the west country village, but the actual<br /> workings of the rustic mind. Jan Oxber is a very striking<br /> oharacter, and his tragic story is told with unforced pathos<br /> and unexaggerated truth.” The Spectator describes it as<br /> Hvigorous,&quot; “ well told,” and “highly entertaining&quot;; and<br /> says that “the author is one of our ablest interpreters of<br /> rural manners.&quot;<br /> UNLEAVENED BREAD, by Robert Grant (Hutchinson, 68.),<br /> is a portrait of a type of American woman. “ Viewed in<br /> the light of a study of character, it would be difficult,” says<br /> the Spectator, &quot; to find a modern novel cleverer than · Un.<br /> leavened Bread.&#039;” The book is divided into three sections.<br /> one for each of Selma&#039;s matrimonial experiments, so that,<br /> says the Literary World, it is “ three moderately long stories<br /> rather than a novel. It is well written, and the characters<br /> succeed in making us accept them as reasonable human<br /> beings.”<br /> BLACK HEART AND WHITE HEART, and Other Stories,<br /> by H. Rider Haggard (Longmans, 68.), are stories of Zulus<br /> and Central Africa. The Daily Chronicle heads its notice<br /> of the yolume : “Mr. Haggard in his True Vein.” “Black<br /> Heart and White Heart,&quot; the tale from which the volume<br /> takes its name, is, says the Spectator, “quite in Mr. Hag.<br /> gard&#039;s most vigorous and effective manner.&quot;<br /> THE ACCUSED PRINCESS, by Allen Upward (Pearson,<br /> 68.), belongs, in the opinion of Literature, &quot;to the class con-<br /> ventionally known as &#039;readable.&#039;” . The author “makes a<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 40 (#62) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 40<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> new departure, and follows in the footsteps of Sherlock<br /> Holmes. His book relates the mystery of the ruby of<br /> Bharani, one of the sacred stones of India and the property<br /> of the British Crown. It tells how the gom was brought<br /> over to Europe to be sold, and how it disappeared and was<br /> subsequently recovered with the help of an English detec-<br /> tive.&quot; The Daily Chronicle finds the story “good and<br /> ingeniously worked-out.” “Mr. Upward&#039;s characters are<br /> quite alive, and the accused princess quite charming.&quot;<br /> THE CHICAMON STONE, by Clive Phillipps-Wolley (Smith,<br /> Elder, and Co., 68.), &quot; is much more than a story for boys,&quot;<br /> says the Spectator, “though by its wealth of incident and<br /> is wealth of incident and<br /> its crazy athleticism ... it will appeal with peculiar<br /> force to the javenile reader. Mr. Phillipps-Wolley is a<br /> poet as well as a sportsman; he has a keen sense of the<br /> picturesque and the sinster, a happy knack of translating<br /> his impressions into forcible and suggestive language, and a<br /> most artistic touch in the portraiture of villains, whether<br /> of the pale or red-skinned variety.” “It is a delightful<br /> book of stirring adventure,” says the Pilot, “one of the<br /> best we have read for some time. The scene is laid in<br /> Alaska; the Chicamon Stone is a specimen of gold, and the<br /> book tells of the efforts of several people to find the rock<br /> from which the specimen was taken, and so to become<br /> rich. There is no love-making, indeed, there is no woman<br /> in the book; the interest of the wild rough life is the only<br /> interest, but that is sufficient, for there is no want of peril<br /> and of thrilling escapes.”<br /> VOICES IN THE NIGHT, by Flora Annie Steel (Heine-<br /> mann, 68.). “ We cannot better summarise our impressions<br /> of this brilliant but unequal novel,” says the Spectator,<br /> &quot; than by saying we have been fascinated by the native or<br /> bazaar portion of the story and bored by the Anglo-Indian<br /> chapters.&quot;<br /> A LADY OF THE REGENCY, by Mrs. Stepney Rawson<br /> (Hutchinson, 68.), is described by the Pilot as &quot;a very fine<br /> historical picture by an excellent artist. Jane, the girl<br /> whose love affairs, after a bad start, come at last to a happy<br /> end, is the Lady of the Regency in question, but from first<br /> to last Caroline of Brunswick is the real heroine. From the<br /> moment the novel opens up with her playing &#039;blind man&#039;s<br /> buff&#039; in her house at Blackheath, or bidding her guests<br /> * bite off the head of the sugar Prince of Wales,&#039; her figure<br /> is thrown on the canvas with masterly art.&quot;<br /> his “Notes on Sport and Travel,” published a few<br /> months ago. The news of Miss Kingsley&#039;s death<br /> came as a great shock to her many friends in this<br /> country. She was about thirty-five years of age.<br /> MR. STEPHEN CRANE died at Baden-weiler,<br /> Baden, on June 5, aged thirty years. Of his<br /> work as author and war correspondent, the most<br /> distinguished is “ The Red Badge of Courage,”<br /> published four years ago. As a detailed study<br /> (in the form of romance) of the development of<br /> a raw recruit in the American Civil War under<br /> the fire of the enemy, it was remarkable in that<br /> the author had<br /> the author had not up to that time had any real<br /> experience of what he so realistically described.<br /> Next in importance comes his “ The Open Boat,&quot;<br /> a sketch of the wreck of a filibuster on the<br /> Florida coast. Mr. Crane also wrote verse. He<br /> was in the Cuban campaign as a correspondent,<br /> and before the illness which has cut him off he<br /> was writing some sketches of his Army experi-<br /> ences before Santiago. He was also to proceed<br /> to St. Helena on a commission for a London<br /> daily. A volume of short stories, which will<br /> probably be called “Wounds in Rain,&quot; and a<br /> novel of adventure are among his literary<br /> remains.<br /> The death-roll of the month also includes the<br /> Rev. J. M. RODWELL, the Orientalist, who trans-<br /> lated the Koran about forty years ago ; Mr. H. R.<br /> FRANCIS (89), author of &quot;Junius Revealed by his<br /> Surviving Grandson,” and an authority on the<br /> literature of angling; Mr. D. D. WELLS, the<br /> young American novelist, author of “Her Lady-<br /> ship&#039;s Leopard,” &amp;c.; and Dr. T. H. RAND (New<br /> Brunswick), whose“ Treasury of Canadian Verse”<br /> has lately been published by Messrs. Dent in this<br /> country.<br /> -<br /> OBITUARY.<br /> * THE AUTHOR.”<br /> SCALE FOR ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> M HE death of Miss Mary KINGSLEY, the<br /> distinguished African traveller, was<br /> announced by a telegram from Cape Town<br /> on June 4. She was on her way to West Africa<br /> to study the fish fauna of the country. Daughter<br /> of Dr. George Kingsley and niece of Charles and<br /> Henry Kingsley, her name first gained prominence<br /> three years ago with the publication of “ Travels<br /> in West Africa, Congo Français, Corisco, and<br /> Cameroons.” Her second volume, “South<br /> African Studies,&quot; was published at the beginning<br /> of last year, and eight months ago she wrote a<br /> little volume on South Africa for the “Story of<br /> the Empire” series. 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333https://historysoa.com/items/show/333The Author, Vol. 11 Issue 03 (August 1900)<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=49&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=%3Cem%3EThe+Author%3C%2Fem%3E%2C+Vol.+11+Issue+03+%28August+1900%29"><em>The Author</em>, Vol. 11 Issue 03 (August 1900)</a><a href="https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390" target="_blank" rel="noopener">https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=51&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=Publication">Publication</a>1900-08-01-The-Author-11-3<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=76&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=1900-08-01">1900-08-01</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=89&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=11">11</a>341–6019000801The Et utbor.<br /> (The Organ of the Incorporated Society of Authors. Monthly.)<br /> CONDUCTED BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> Vol. XI.—No. 3.]<br /> AUGUST 1, 1900.<br /> [PRICE SIXPENCE.<br /> 2<br /> ... 53<br /> CONTENTS.<br /> PAGE<br /> PAGE<br /> Memoranda ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 41<br /> The Authors&#039; Club ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 52<br /> Literary Property<br /> Civil List Pensions ...<br /> 1. United States Circuit Court.-Southern District of New<br /> The Police as Censors<br /> York ... .. . ... ... ... ... ... ... 42 Bombay Society of Authors ...<br /> ... 54<br /> 2. Review or Return? ...<br /> Correspondence --1. Concerning English Authors ia the United<br /> 3. The Chambers of Commerce<br /> • States. 2. &quot; Printers&#039; Errors&quot; 3. Long Retention of MSS.<br /> The Copyright Act and the Five Gratis Copies<br /> 1 ... 44<br /> 4. The Indian Government as Publishers. 5. The Hardships<br /> American Letter. By John Russell Davidson<br /> ... 46<br /> of the Typist ... . ... ... ... ... ... ... 54<br /> Paris Letter, By Darracotte Scott ...<br /> Book and Play Talk...<br /> Notes from the Bulletin of the Society of American Authors.” 51 |<br /> | Books and Reviews ...<br /> ...<br /> 48<br /> PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOCIETY.<br /> 1. The Annual Report. That for the past year can be had on application to the Secretary.<br /> The Author. A Monthly Journal devoted especially to the protection and maintenance of Literary<br /> Property. Issued to all Members, 6s. 6d. per annum. Back numbers are offered at the<br /> following prices : Vol. I., 108. 6d. (Bound); Vols. II., III., and IV., 88. 6d. each (Bound);<br /> Vols. V. to VIII. (Unbound), 6s. 6d.<br /> 3. Literature and the Pension List. By W. MORRIS COLLES, Barrister-at-Law. Henry Glaisher,<br /> 95, Strand, W.C. 38.<br /> 4. The History of the Société des Gens de Lettres. By S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE, late Secretary to<br /> the Society. 18.<br /> 5. The Cost of Production. In this work specimens are given of the most important forms of type,<br /> size of page, &amp;c., with estimates showing what it costs to produce the more common kinds of<br /> books. Henry Glaisher, 95, Strand, W.C. 28. 6d. (Out of print at present.)<br /> 6. The Various Methods of Publication. By S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE. In this work, compiled from the<br /> papers in the Society&#039;s offices, the various forms of agreements proposed by Publishers to<br /> Authors are examined, and their meaning carefully explained, with an account of the various<br /> kinds of fraud which have been made possible by the different clauses in their agreements.<br /> Henry Glaisher, 95, Strand, W.C. 38. .<br /> 7. Copyright Law Reform. An Exposition of Lord Monkswell&#039;s Copyright Bill of 1890. With<br /> Extracts from the Report of the Commission of 1878, and an Appendix containing the<br /> Berne Convention and the American Copyright Bill. By J. M. LELY. Eyre and Spottis-<br /> woode. 18. 6d.<br /> 8. The Society of Authors. A Record of its Action from its Foundation. By Walter BESANT<br /> (Chairman of Committee, 1888–1892). 18.<br /> 9. The Contract of Publication in Germany, Austria, Hungary, and Switzerland. By ERNST<br /> LUNGE, J.U.D. 28. 6d.<br /> 10. The Addenda to the “Methods of Publishing.&quot; &quot;By G. HERBERT THRING. Being additional<br /> facts collected at the office of the Society since the publication of the “ Methods,&quot; With<br /> comments and advice. 28.<br /> 11. Forms of Agreement issued by the Publishers&#039; Association ; with Comments. By G. HERBERT<br /> THRING, and Illustrative Examples by Sir WALTER BESANT. 18.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 40 (#66) ##############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> The Society of Nuthors (Incorporated).<br /> PRESIDENT.<br /> GEORGE MEREDITH.<br /> COUNCIL.<br /> SIR EDWIN ARNOLD, K.C.I.E., C.S.I. AUSTIN DOBson.<br /> SIR LEWIS MORRIS.<br /> J. M. BARRIE.<br /> A. CONAN DOYLE, M.D.<br /> HENRY NORMAN.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> A. W. DUBOURG.<br /> Miss E. A. ORMEROD.<br /> ROBERT BATEMAN.<br /> SIR MICHAEL FOSTER, K.C.B., F.R.S. GILBERT PARKER.<br /> F. E. BEDDARD, F.R.Ş.<br /> D. W. FRESHFIELD.<br /> J. C. PARKINSON.<br /> SIR HENRY BERGNE, K.C.M.G.<br /> RICHARD GARNETT, C.B., LL.D.<br /> A. W. PINERO.<br /> SIR WALTER BEBANT.<br /> EDMUND GOSSE.<br /> THE RIGHT Hon. THE LORD PIR-<br /> AUGUSTINE BIRRELL, M.P.<br /> H. RIDER HAGGARD.<br /> BRIGHT, F.R.S.<br /> THE REV. PROF. BONNEY, F.R.S. THOMAS HARDY.<br /> SIR FREDERICK POLLOCK, Bart., LL.D.<br /> THE RIGHT HON. JAMES BRYCE, M.P. ANTHONY HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> WALTER HERRIES POLLOCK.<br /> THE RIGHT Hon. THE LORD BURGH JEROME K. JEROME.<br /> E. ROSE.<br /> CLERE.<br /> J. SCOTT KELTIE, LL.D.<br /> W. BAPTISTE SCOONES.<br /> HALL CAINE.<br /> RUDYARD KIPLING.<br /> Miss FLORA L. SHAW.<br /> EGERTON CASTLE, F.S.A.<br /> PROF. E. RAY LANKESTER, F.R.S. G. R. SIMS.<br /> P. W. CLAYDEN.<br /> THE RIGHT HON. W. E. H. LECKY, S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE.<br /> EDWARD CLODD.<br /> M.P.<br /> J. J. STEVENSON.<br /> W. MORRIS COLLES.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> FRANCIS STORR.<br /> THE HON. JOHN COLLIER. .<br /> The Rev. W. J. LOFTIE, F.S.A. WILLIAM MOY THOMAS.<br /> SIR W. MARTIN CONWAY.<br /> SIR A. C. MACKENZIE, Mus.Doo. MRS. HUMPHRY WARD.<br /> F. MARION CRAWFORD.<br /> PROF. J. M. D. MEIKLEJOHN.<br /> Miss CHARLOTTE M. YONGB.<br /> THE Right Hon. THE LORD CURZON THE REV. C. H. MIDDLETON-WAKE.<br /> OF KEDLESTON.<br /> Hon. Counsel – E. M. UNDERDOWN, Q.C.<br /> COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT.<br /> Chairman-A. HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> J. SCOTT KELTIE, LL.D.<br /> GILBERT PARKER.<br /> SIR WALTER BESANT.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> E. ROSE.<br /> EGERTON CASTLE, F.S.A.<br /> HENRY NORMAN.<br /> FRANCIS STORR.<br /> D. W. FRESHFIELD.<br /> &#039;SUB-COMMITTEES.&#039;<br /> ART.<br /> Hon. John COLLIER (Chairman). I SIR W. MARTIN CONWAY.<br /> M. H. SPIELMANN<br /> COPYRIGHT.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> A. HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> W. M. COLLES.<br /> GILBERT PARKER.<br /> DRAMA.<br /> HENRY ARTHUR JONES (Chairman). I F. C. BURNAND.<br /> A. W. PINERO.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> SYDNEY GRUNDY.<br /> EDWARD ROSE.<br /> Solicitors<br /> FIELD, ROSCOE, and Co., Lincoln&#039;s Inn Fields.<br /> CG. HERBERT THRING, 4, Portugal-street.<br /> Secretary-G. HERBERT THRING.<br /> OFFICES : 4, PORTUGAL STREET, Lincoln&#039;s Inn FIELDS, W.C.<br /> A. P. WATT &amp; SON,<br /> LITERARY AGENTS,<br /> Formerly of 2, PATERNOSTER SQUARE,<br /> Have now removed to<br /> HASTINGS HOUSE, NORFOLK STREET, STRAND,<br /> LONDON, W.C.<br /> THE KNIGHTS and KINGS of CHESS. By the Rev.<br /> 1 GA. MACDONNELL, B.A. Price 28. 6d. net.<br /> London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.C.<br /> THE ART of CHESS. By JAMES Mason. Price 5s.<br /> L net, by post 58. 4d<br /> London: HORACE Cox, Wirdsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.C.<br /> |<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 41 (#67) ##############################################<br /> <br /> The Author.<br /> (The Organ of the Incorporated Society of Authors. Monthly.)<br /> CONDUCTED BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> VOL. XI.—No. 3.]<br /> AUGUST 1, 1900.<br /> [PRICE SIXPENCE.<br /> For<br /> the Opinions expressed in papers that are<br /> signed or initialled the Authors alone are<br /> responsible. None of the papers or para-<br /> graphs must be taken as expressing the<br /> collective opinions of the Committee unless<br /> they are officially signed by G. Herbert<br /> Thring, Sec.<br /> M HE Secretary of the Society begs to give notice that all<br /> 1 remittances are acknowledged by return of post, and<br /> requests that all members not receiving an answer to<br /> important communications within two days will write to him<br /> without delay. All remittances should be crossed Union<br /> Bank of London, Chancery-lane, or be sent by registered<br /> letter only.<br /> (6.) Not to bind yourself for future work to any publisher.<br /> As well bind yourself for the future to any one solicitor or<br /> doctor!<br /> III. THE ROYALTY SYSTEM.<br /> It is above all things necessary to know what the<br /> proposed royalty means to both sides. It is now possible<br /> for an author to ascertain approximately and very nearly<br /> the truth. From time to time the very important figures<br /> connected with royalties are published in The Author.<br /> Readers can also work out the figures themselves from the<br /> “Cost of Production.&quot;<br /> IV. A COMMISSION AGREEMENT.<br /> The main points are :-<br /> (1.) Be careful to obtain a fair cost of production.<br /> (2.) Keep control of the advertisements.<br /> (3.) Keep control of the sale price of the book.<br /> GENERAL.<br /> All other forms of agreement are combinations of the four<br /> above mentioned.<br /> Such combinations are generally disastrous to the author.<br /> Never sign any agreement without competent advice from<br /> the Secretary of the Society.<br /> Stamp all agreements with the Inland Revenue stamp.<br /> Avoid agreements by letter if possible.<br /> The main points which the Society has always demanded<br /> from the outset are :-<br /> (1.) That both sides shall know what an agreement<br /> means.<br /> (2.) The inspection of those account books which belong<br /> to the author. We are advised that this is a right, in the<br /> nature of a common law right, which cannot be denied or<br /> withheld.<br /> Communications and letters are invited by the Editor on<br /> all subjects connected with literature, but on no other sub-<br /> joots whatever. Articles which cannot be accepted are<br /> returned if stamps for the purpose accompany the MSS.<br /> GENERAL MEMORANDA.<br /> WARNINGS TO DRAMATIC AUTHORS.<br /> TERE are a few standing rules to be observed in an<br /> agreement. There are four methods of dealing<br /> with literary property :<br /> 1. THAT OF SELLING IT OUTRIGHT.<br /> This is in some respects the most satisfactory, if a proper<br /> price can be obtained. Bat the transaction should be<br /> managed by a competent agent, or with the advice of the<br /> Secretary of the Society.<br /> II. A PROFIT-SHARING AGREEMENT (a bad form of<br /> agreement).<br /> In this case the following rules should be attended to:<br /> (1.) Not to sign any agreement in which the cost of pro-<br /> duction forms a part without the strictest investigation.<br /> (2.) Not to give the publisher the power of putting the<br /> e the onblisher the power of putting the<br /> profits into his own pocket by charging for advertisements<br /> in his own organs: or by charging exchange advertise.<br /> ments. Therefore keep control of the advertisements.<br /> (3.) Not to allow a special charge for “ office expenses,&quot;<br /> unless the same allowance is made to the author.<br /> (4.) Not to give up American, Colonial, or Continental<br /> (5.) Not to give up serial or translation rights.<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> 1. N EVER sign an agreement without submitting it to<br /> the Secretary of the Society of Authors or some<br /> competent legal authority.<br /> 2. It is well to be extremely careful in negotiating for<br /> the production of a play with anyone except an established<br /> manager.<br /> 3. There are three forms of dramatic contract for PLAYS<br /> IN THREE OR MORE ACTS :-<br /> (a.) SALE OUTRIGHT OF THE PERFORMING RIGHT.<br /> This is unsatisfactory. An author who enters<br /> into such a contract shoald stipulate in the con-<br /> tract for production of the piece by a certain date<br /> and for proper publication of his name on the<br /> play-bills.<br /> G 2<br /> rights.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 42 (#68) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 42<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> Secretary will always be glad to have any agreements, new<br /> or old, for inspection and note. The infor nation thus<br /> obtained may prove invaluable.<br /> 4. Before signing any agreement whatever, send the pro-<br /> posed document to the Society for examination.<br /> 5. Remember always that in belonging to the Society you<br /> are fighting the battles of other writers, even if you are<br /> reaping no benefit to yourself, and that you are advancing<br /> the best interests of literature in promoting the indepen.<br /> dence of the writer.<br /> 6. The Committee have now arranged for the reception of<br /> members&#039; agreements and their preservation in a fireproof<br /> safe. The agreements will, of course, be regarded as con-<br /> fidential documents to be read only by the Secretary, who<br /> will keep the key of the safe. The Society now offers :-(1)<br /> To read and advise upon agreements and publishers. (2) To<br /> stamp agreements in readiness for a possible action upon<br /> them. (3) To keep agreements. (4) To enforce payments<br /> due according to agreements.<br /> THE READING BRANCH.<br /> (6.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF PERCENTAGES<br /> on gross receipts. Peroentages vary between<br /> 5 and 15 per cent. An author should obtain &amp;<br /> percentage on the sliding scale of gro88 receipts<br /> in preference to the American system. Should<br /> obtain a sum in advance of percentages. A fixed<br /> date on or before which the play should be<br /> performed.<br /> (c.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF ROYALTIES (i.e.,<br /> fixed nightly fees). This method should be<br /> always avoided except in cases where the fees<br /> are likely to be small or difficult to collect. The<br /> other safeguards set out under heading (b.) apply<br /> also in this case.<br /> 4. PLAYS IN ONE ACT are often sold outright, but it is<br /> better to obtain a small nightly fee if possible, and a sum<br /> paid in advance of such fees in any event. It is extremely<br /> important that the amateur rights of one act plays should<br /> be reserved.<br /> 5. Authors should remember that performing rights can<br /> be limited, and are usually limited by town, country, and<br /> time. This is most important.<br /> 6. Authors should not assign performing rights, but<br /> sbould grant a licence to perform. The legal distinction is<br /> of great importance.<br /> 7. Authors should remember that performing rights in a<br /> play are distinct from literary copyright. A manager<br /> holding the performing right or licence to perform cannot<br /> print the book of the words. :<br /> 8. Never forget that American rights may be exceedingly<br /> valuable. They should never be included in English<br /> agreements without the author obtaining a substantial<br /> consideration.<br /> 9. Agreements for collaboration should be carefully<br /> drawn and executed before collaboration is commenced.<br /> 10. An author should remember that production of a play<br /> is highly speculative: that he runs a very great risk of<br /> delay and a breakdown in the fulfilment of his contract.<br /> He should therefore guard himself all the more carefully in<br /> the beginning.<br /> 11. An author must remember that the dramatic market<br /> is exceedingly limited, and that for a novice the first object<br /> is to obtain adequate publication.<br /> &quot;As these warnings must necessarily be incomplete on<br /> acoount of the wide range of the subject of dramatic con.<br /> tracts, those authors desirous of further information are<br /> referred to the Secretary of the Society.<br /> M EMBERS will greatly assist the Society in this<br /> 1 branch of their work by informing young writers of<br /> its existence. Their MSS. can be read and treated<br /> as a composition is treated by a coach. The term MSS.<br /> includes not only works of fiction but poetry and dramatic<br /> works, and when it is possible, under special arrangement,<br /> technical and scientific works. The Readers are writers of<br /> competence and experience. The fee is one guinea.<br /> NOTICES.<br /> THE Editor of The Author begs to remind members of the<br /> 1 Society that, although the paper is sent to them free<br /> of charge, the cost of producing it would be a very<br /> heavy charge on the resources of the Society if a great<br /> many members did not forward to the Secretary the modest<br /> 68. 6d. subscription for the year.<br /> Communications for The Author should be addressed to<br /> the Offices of the Society, 4, Portugal-street, Lincoln&#039;s-inn<br /> Fields, W.C., and should reach the Editor not later than the<br /> 21st of each month.<br /> All persons engaged in literary work of any kind, whether<br /> members of the Society or not, are invited to communicate<br /> to the Editor any points connected with their work which<br /> it would be advisable in the general interest to publish.<br /> The present location of the Authors&#039; Club is at 3, White-<br /> ball-court, Charing Cross. Address the Secretary for<br /> information, rules of admission, &amp;c.<br /> HOW TO USE THE SOCIETY.<br /> ·<br /> LITERARY PROPERTY.<br /> 1. HVERY member has a right to ask for and to receive<br /> advice upon his agreements, his choice of a pub.<br /> lisher, or any dispute arising in the conduct of his<br /> business or the administration of his property. If the<br /> advice bought is such as can be given best by a solici.<br /> tor, the member has a right to an opinion from the<br /> Society&#039;s solicitors. If the case is such that Counsel&#039;s<br /> opinion is desirable, the Committee will obtain for him<br /> Counsel&#039;s opinion. All this without any cost to the member.<br /> 2. Remember that questions connected with copyright<br /> and publisher&#039;s agreoments do not generally fall within the<br /> experience of ordinary solicitors. Therefore, do not scruple<br /> to use the Society.<br /> 3. Send to the Office copies of past agreements and past<br /> at<br /> accounts with the loan of the books represented. The<br /> I.-UNITED STATES CIRCUIT COURT.-SOUTHERN<br /> DISTRICT OF NEW YORK.<br /> M HE Chancellor, Masters, and Scholars of<br /> the University of Oxford. Complainant. v.<br /> - Wilmore-Andrews Publishing Company,<br /> Defendant. (In Equity). Rowland Cox for<br /> Complainant. Louis F. Doyle for Defendant.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 43 (#69) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 43<br /> WHEELER, J. - The University of Oxford, right in any false manner to represent such a<br /> England, is a body corporate known by the name product as the work of the plaintiff. The use of<br /> and style by which this suit is brought.<br /> the name upon the defendant&#039;s Bibles had a<br /> Books appear to have been printed by it as tendency to so represent, and to confuse the<br /> early as the fifteenth century, and Letters Patent plaintiff&#039;s use of its name in its business.<br /> for printing books of all kinds, including Bibles, to That the plaintiff prints and publishes this<br /> have been granted to it by King Charles I. in the work in America as well as at the University<br /> seventeenth century.<br /> makes it none the less the plaintiff&#039;s product, and<br /> It has printed Bibles of many kinds prepared confers no right upon others to publish it in the<br /> by its officers and scholars with great care, which name of the plaintiff, or to use the plaintiff&#039;s<br /> are generally known as Oxford Bibles ; no other name in publishing it in America or elsewhere.<br /> Bibles are published at Oxford, and these are The evidence does not show acquiescence of the<br /> ordered, sold, and bought by that name. Among plaintiff in use by others amounting to an aban-<br /> the kinds is the “ Teachers Bible,” first published donment of right by the plaintiff, nor establish<br /> in 1876, which contains, besides the text, a Manual that the name has thereby or otherwise become<br /> of Helps to the study of the Bible full of reliable merely descriptive of the Bibles, instead of repre-<br /> information respecting the authors and books of senting their origin; nor that an “Oxford<br /> the Bible, and Palestine, a concordance, indices, Bible&quot; is merely the “ Divinity Circuit.”<br /> tables, and maps. This with new editions has The case shows sufficient interference by the<br /> since been published and sold by that name con- defendant to furnish ground for commencing the<br /> tinuously in this country, and throughout the suit, and the ceasing of the interference by the<br /> world.<br /> defendant does not take away the right of the<br /> The defendant has printed and published a plaintiff to a decree, with costs. Sufficient reason<br /> Bible specified on the title page as an “Oxford does not, however, appear to warrant an account-<br /> Bible, the S. S. Teachers Edition,&quot; and on the ing. Rahtjen v. Holzapfel, U.S. Circuit Court<br /> back as a “Holy Bible, Oxford, S. S. Teachers of Appeals, Second Circuit, April 11, 1900.<br /> Edition.”<br /> Decree for a perpetual injunction, with costs.<br /> This suit is brought against this use of that<br /> name.<br /> The defendant denies any right of the plaintiff<br /> II.—REVIEW OR RETURN ?<br /> to the exclusive use of the word “ Oxford” upon The following interesting case has been placed<br /> Bibles, and alleges that this name as applied to before the Secretary of the Society of Authors :-<br /> Bibles is used to designate and describe a style of An author publishes a limited edition of a<br /> Bible otherwise known as the “ Divinity Circuit,” very expensive illustrated work. He sends out<br /> bound in soft flexible leather, with overlapping four copies for review to the editors of the best<br /> edges; that the plaintiff has lost any right it known papers. The edition will not stand the<br /> may have had to the use of this word by permit. distribution of a larger number of review copies.<br /> ting others to use it; that the Bible with which One of the papers, after a lapse of five or six<br /> the defendant is claimed to interfere was printed weeks, fails to review the book. The author<br /> in this country; and that the defendant has writes to the editor, and the editor states that the<br /> altogether &#039;ceased using it.<br /> buok was acknowledged in due course in his list<br /> • It is insisted for the defendant that the name of publications of the day. The author again<br /> of a place of origin cannot become a valid trade writes to the editor, and points out that the book<br /> mark of goods and products, and that “Oxford ” was sent in order that it might be reviewed, and<br /> here is merely the name of the city of the plaintiff, asks for the return of the copy if it is not the<br /> and could not be exclusively used to distinguish intention of the editor to review it. To this<br /> the plaintiff&#039;s Bibles.<br /> letter the editor replies that the discretion with<br /> But this word is a part of the plaintiff&#039;s name, regard to the review of the book must be left<br /> and as such has given name to the plaintiff&#039;s entirely in his hands, and that it would be impos-<br /> Bibles, and has come to be a means of showing sible for him as editor of the paper to return the<br /> their origin. The defendant has no connection book.<br /> with the place or name, and this use of the name This interesting question arises : In the<br /> by the defendant can be for no purpose but to case of a valuable limited edition would it be<br /> represent the defendant&#039;s Bibles as coming from possible to argue that the book sent was for<br /> the plaintiff.<br /> review, and that the reviewing of the book was<br /> The plaintiff has no copyright of this work, and part of the contract, so that if the book was not<br /> anyone would, of course, have a clear right to reviewed it could not become the property of the<br /> print and publish it, but no one would have a paper to which it was sent; or, on the other hand,<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 44 (#70) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 44<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> “Where a licence has been granted under this section for<br /> any British possession, any copy of the book produced<br /> subject to such licence sball, if found in any other part of<br /> Her Majesty&#039;s dominions, be deemed a pirated copy, and be<br /> treated accordingly.&#039;<br /> that the custom of sending out books for review<br /> as at present established is on the understanding<br /> that books so sent out take their chance, and that<br /> as they are sent out gratis on this understanding<br /> the editor is not bound to return them? The<br /> latter would appear to be the real legal position,<br /> but it is a further question as to what might<br /> happen if the author when sending out such a<br /> book stipulated in his letter that the book should<br /> be reviewed or the copy returned.<br /> THE COPYRIGHT ACT AND THE FIVE<br /> GRATIS COPIES.<br /> III.<br /> III.—THE CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE.<br /> The resolution printed below was unanimously<br /> passed at the meeting of the Chambers of Com-<br /> merce of the British Empire. The resolution is<br /> of considerable importance to authors, as any step<br /> that can facilitate the passing of Lord Monks-<br /> well&#039;s Bill nust necessarily have great weight<br /> with all those who are holders of literary pro-<br /> perty. One of the chief difficulties of the passing<br /> of the Bill, as has been pointed out on many<br /> previous occasions in The Author, is the colonial<br /> question. As at this meeting of the Chambers of<br /> Commerce there were important representatives<br /> of the publishing and printing trades of all the<br /> colonies, such a resolution, in that it has been<br /> supported by these representatives, will have con-<br /> siderable weight with the Colonial Office and<br /> those concerned in promoting the Bill.<br /> Fourth CONGRESS OF THE CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE OF<br /> THE BRITISH EMPIRE.<br /> [Copyright.]<br /> Moved by Mr. Geo. N. Morang ; seconded by Hon. Thomas<br /> Fergus of New Zealand :<br /> &quot; Whereas the various Copyright Acts throughout the<br /> Empire are unnecessarily complicated and vexatious to<br /> certain dependencies, and whereas it is now contemplated<br /> to consolidate the same by a Bill now before the House of<br /> Lords. Resolved, therefore, that this Congress declares its<br /> approval of such measure, whereby the Colonies are em.<br /> powered to legislate for exclusive copyright, and earnestly<br /> trusts that it may speedily become law.&quot;<br /> Note.-The section of the Act referred to is as follows:-<br /> Sect. 34. “In the case of a legislature of any British<br /> possession, if the following circumstances occur, that is to<br /> say, if a book has been first lawfully published in any other<br /> part of Her Majesty&#039;s dominions, and it is proved to the<br /> satisfaction of an officer appointed by the Government of<br /> guch possession to receive such proofs that the owner of the<br /> copyright has lawfully granted either a licence to import<br /> for sale in such British possession or a licence to reproduce<br /> therein by any process an edition or editions of any such<br /> book designed for sale only in such British possession,<br /> it shall be lawful for the Legislature of such possession by<br /> Act or ordinance to provide for the prohibition of the impor-<br /> tation, except with the written consent of the licensee, into<br /> such possession of any copies of such book printed else-<br /> where, except under such licence as aforesaid, except that<br /> two copies may be specially imported for the bona fide ase<br /> of each of the public free libraries, of the aniversity and<br /> college libraries, and law libraries of any duly organised<br /> law institution cr society for the use of its members.<br /> TN the July Author we reviewed the various<br /> T statutes from 1662 to 1842 which regulated<br /> the business of sending a copy of every book<br /> published to the British Museum, whether<br /> demanded or not, and to Oxford, Cambridge,<br /> Edinburgh, and Dublin upon demand. It will<br /> now be desirable to say something upon the<br /> obligation of the British Museum authorities to<br /> require and preserve books, and, if we can,<br /> upon the obligation of the other authorities to<br /> preserve them, for clearly the other authorities<br /> are under no obligation to require any book<br /> whatever.<br /> For a very long time publishers have sent<br /> practically all their books to the British Museum.<br /> and the penalty for failure to send is heavy, but<br /> statutory obligation to require books or to enforce<br /> penalties there is none. Bearing this in mind,<br /> and bearing in mind also that the British Museum<br /> privilege has existed only since 1814, we think it is<br /> greatly to the credit of the authorities that the<br /> occasions on which a book published in the United<br /> Kingdom cannot be found in the British Museum<br /> library are rare indeed. Where exceptions occur,<br /> he does a public service who calls attention to<br /> them, as did recently Wirt Gerrare in a letter to<br /> Literature.<br /> As to the duty of the British Museum autho-<br /> rities to preserve books, that is much more<br /> implied than express, though there are express<br /> directions as to particular libraries. The Geor-<br /> gian statute, by which the museum was established<br /> in 1753, after reciting that-<br /> Sir Hans Sloane, having through the course of many<br /> years with great labours and expence gathered together<br /> whatever could be procured either in our own or foreign<br /> countries, did bequeath to certain trustees all his collec-<br /> tion, consisting of all his library of books, drawings, manu-<br /> scripts, prints, &amp;c., &amp;c., with short histories or accounts of<br /> them with proper references in catalogues by him made,<br /> containing thirty-eight volumes in folio and eight volumes<br /> in quarto, to be offered to Parliament for £20,000; the<br /> collection, which was worth much more, was bought for<br /> the £20,000; all arts and sciences have a connexion with<br /> each other; and the collection should be maintained not only<br /> for the inspection and entertainment of the learned and the<br /> curious, but for the general age and benefit of the public ;-<br /> and also reciting the bequest to the public of<br /> the Cottonian Library, and the building of a room<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 45 (#71) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 45<br /> under an Act of William III. “ in which, when<br /> built, all the manuscripts, written books, papers,<br /> parchments, records, and other memorials in the<br /> said library contained should be lodged and there<br /> kept to all posterity,&quot; the legacy of Mr. Arthur<br /> Edwards towards the expense of building, and<br /> the foundation of the Harleian Collection, enacted<br /> that in the cities of London or Westminster<br /> One general repository shall be provided for the reception<br /> not only of the collection of Sir Hans Sloane, but also of the<br /> Cottonian Library, and of the additions which have been or<br /> shall be made by virtue of the will of Arthur Edwards, and<br /> likewise of the Harleian Collection and of such other addi.<br /> tions to the Cottonian Library as with the approbation of<br /> the trustees shall be made, and of such other collections<br /> and libraries as with the like approbation shall be admitted<br /> into the said general repository, which several collections,<br /> additions, and library so received into the said general<br /> repository shall remain and be preserved therein for public<br /> use to all posterity.<br /> This enactment is a clear direction to the<br /> authorities to preserve libraries and collections<br /> bequeathed or given en bloc to the museum, but it<br /> could hardly be said to include the masses of<br /> single books which the law of copyright has<br /> thrown into it ever since 1814. However that<br /> of<br /> may be, the Act of 1878, which empowers the<br /> authorities to give away duplicates, and the<br /> recently rejected Bill by which it was proposed<br /> to empower the trustees to dispose of valueless<br /> printed matter, seem to show that “ once in the<br /> museum, always in the museum” is recognised<br /> as an implied rule,* and it may be assumed<br /> that the trustees have always recognised, still<br /> recognise, and will always recognise this rule.<br /> But what of the other four library authorities<br /> The publishers, as we have seen, have long treated<br /> them as equally entitled with the British Museum<br /> * The Bill as it came from the House of Lords had<br /> this clause :<br /> “ The trustees of the British Museum may, with the<br /> approval of the Treasury, make rules respecting the disposal<br /> by destruction or otherwise of printed matter deposited in<br /> the British Museum which is not of sufficient value to<br /> justify its preservation in the museum.”<br /> The Bill was dropped with the general approval of<br /> literary persons; but it may be that the intention of its<br /> framers never was to destroy anything that could possibly<br /> be called a book or pamphlet, but only blank forms,<br /> Christmas cards, wall-texts, and such like matter, whereas<br /> except for judicial decision, perhaps even newspapers are<br /> not deliverable ander the existing law. See Report of<br /> Copyright Commission, par. 166.<br /> The 3rd secticn of the British Museum Act 1878 pro-<br /> vides that,<br /> “The trustees of the British Museum may give away<br /> any duplicate works, objects, or specimens not required for<br /> the purposes of the museum. Provided always, that the<br /> power hereby conferred shall not extend to any daplicate<br /> works in the Royal Library of King George the Fourth, or<br /> in the Cracherode, Grenville, or Banksian Libraries, or to<br /> any objects presented to the Museum for age and preserva-<br /> tion therein.&quot;<br /> to gratis copies, and have, as a general rule,<br /> forwarded four copies either to the agent whom<br /> they share amongst them, or else to Stationers&#039;<br /> Hall for the use of the four libraries, without<br /> waiting for any demand. In the rare cases in<br /> which the four copies are not sent, and apparently<br /> in all those rare cases, the publisher in default<br /> receives the following notice :-<br /> To Messrs. -<br /> Agency of the University Libraries, 96, Great<br /> Russell-street, London, W.C.<br /> I am desired by the Curators of the Bodleian Library,<br /> Oxford ; the University Library, Cambridge; the Advocates<br /> Library, Edinburgh; and the Library of Trinity College,<br /> Dublin, to ask you to be good enough to supply for the use<br /> of their libraries, four [the italios are not ours) copies of<br /> the undermentioned works, one for each library, in com-<br /> pliance with the provisions of the Copyright Act (5 &amp; 6 Vict.<br /> cap. 45).<br /> Should any of the works applied for be outside the terms<br /> of the Act, or have already been delivered through another<br /> channel, you would confer on the libraries in question, and<br /> on myself, a great favoar by returning me this list, and<br /> notifying the reason of the exemption on the margin (the<br /> italics are not ours]. I should thus be able to avoid troubling<br /> you with repeated applications for unclaimable works.-<br /> Believe me, yours faithfully, G. W. ECCLES.<br /> It will be seen, on referring to the June Author,<br /> that Mr. Eccles acted for the University of<br /> Oxford so far back as 1876, and on referring<br /> to the list of British Museum officers in<br /> “ Whitaker&#039;s Almanac&quot; that Mr. Eccles holds<br /> the position of an “ Assistant, ist class,” of the<br /> Museum ; but we understand that he is shortly<br /> about to retire from that position.<br /> So much for the seemingly very efficient mode<br /> of getting the four gratis copies into the four<br /> University libraries. How about their preserva-<br /> tion there? Unlike the British Museum Library<br /> authorities, the other library authorities are not<br /> even under any implied obligation to preserve<br /> them, and, unlike those authorities, they have no<br /> annual reminder in the Appropriation Act —<br /> under which the British Museum receives a hand.<br /> some grant, but the Universities receive nothing.<br /> IV.<br /> The following letter was sent to the Times by<br /> the chairman of the Committee, and appeared<br /> there on May 31. By an unfortunate oversight<br /> it was not published, as it should have been, in<br /> our July number :-<br /> To the Editor of the Times.<br /> Sir,-The letter recently addressed to you by<br /> Mr. John Murray, in reference to the question<br /> of “gratis copies,&quot; seems to the Committee of this<br /> Society to offer an opportunity of calling atten-<br /> tion to one or two points besides those with which<br /> Mr. Murray deals. It is material to point out<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 46 (#72) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 46<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> that the tax is heavier than appears to have been of 1878 recommended the abolition of the privi.<br /> in the original contemplation of Parliament. lege, a fact which justifies the inquiry we now<br /> By the Act of 1842 a broad distinction is drawn suggest, although we do not wish to pre-judge<br /> between the British Museum and the four other the issue of it. Meanwhile it would seem to be<br /> privileged libraries. The former is to have a in the power of publishers themselves to raise<br /> copy of every book without demand. To the the question whether the existing law does not<br /> latter any book is to be delivered “on demand require a specific demand on the part of each<br /> thereof left at the place of abode of the pub- library for any book it may desire to have<br /> lisher . .” The section goes on to authorise delivered.<br /> the authorities of the four libraries to appoint an We have also to ask your indulgence to allow<br /> agent to receive the books demanded. We submit us to state that we find among our members,<br /> that the intention of Parliament plainly was that many of whom are engaged in research, strong dis-<br /> the University libraries, as distinguished from the approval of the proposal to allow the British<br /> British Museum, should make a specific demand Museum either to destroy or to scatter news-<br /> for any book they desired to receive, and that in papers. This question has been so fully dealt<br /> the absence of such demand the book should not with by Mr. Sidney Lee in your columns, that it<br /> be delivered to them.<br /> is enough to say that his objections, whether<br /> The Act contemplates an exercise of discretion, based on the danger of destruction or loss of<br /> according to which the libraries would ask for valuable matter, or on the hardship of compelling<br /> such books as would be of use to them and literary men engaged in research to follow their<br /> abstain from asking for the rest.<br /> dispersed materials from one place to another,<br /> The practice, however, is and has been for a appear far too serious to be disposed of by the<br /> long while back, quite different. Most publishers cry of “no room.&quot; There is no disposition<br /> send copies to the agent of the four libraries (they among authors to grumble at being obliged to<br /> all employ the same agent) without any demand. supply their books to the Museum. That they<br /> If any book is not sent, it is demanded as a are under this obligation does, however, seem to<br /> matter of course. By the claims of the libraries give them a right to e, pecial consideration when<br /> and the acquiescence of publishers, the libraries such a question as this is under discussion.<br /> are, under the existing practice, placed in the same<br /> ANTHONY HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> position as the British Museum, although they<br /> do not appear to be under any similar obligation<br /> to retain the books sent or to be subject to any<br /> statutory control in the use or disposal of the<br /> AMERICAN LETTER.<br /> property they thus acquire. It also appears<br /> obvious that they must acquire a vast number of<br /> New York City, July 10, 1900.<br /> books which can be of no value to them.<br /> TN these United States publishers are inclined<br /> We desire respectfully to suggest that before<br /> 1 to look askance upon the season of a Pre-<br /> the Copyright Bill now before Parliament takes<br /> - sidential campaign, and the commercially-<br /> final shape the following questions should be con-<br /> disposed author ordinarily shares this feeling of<br /> sidered :-<br /> suspicion. It is not a time for the launching of<br /> (1) Is the present system of a general demand<br /> new undertakings; the public mind is busied with<br /> of all books (if not sent without demand) on the<br /> “issues” and “ platforms,” and people would<br /> part of the University libraries in accordance with<br /> rather devour candidate So-and-so&#039;s last speech<br /> the intentions of Parliament ?<br /> or a denunciation of the legislative career of<br /> (2) When did the practice of a general<br /> candidate What&#039;s-his-name than read poetry or<br /> demand begin? Has it existed from the first, or<br /> romance. Once in every four years the country<br /> has it been of later growth; and, if so, under what<br /> is inundated with a prodigious flood of campaign<br /> circumstances did it first arise ?<br /> “ literature,” with which the enlightened voters<br /> (3) Are all the books received actually placed<br /> struggle madly, while current reading matter of<br /> in use in the libraries; or, if not, how are they all<br /> other descriptions glides by in an unnoticed and<br /> dealt with ?<br /> unimportant rivulet. Even the attention of the<br /> (4) Are any of the books disposed of by the<br /> scholar is diverted temporarily from literature to<br /> libraries; and, if so, after what lapse of time and<br /> the politics of the hour.<br /> in what manner ?<br /> An answer to these questions would, it appears<br /> POLITICS AND LITERATURE.<br /> to us, help to show how far the tax on authors The present campaign, however, which is to<br /> and publishers is justified by benefit to the public. terminate with the election of a President in<br /> It will be remembered that the Royal Commission November, promises to be less disturbing than<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 47 (#73) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 47<br /> usual. The publishing world seems to believe realised. It enlarges immeasurably the scope of<br /> confidently in the re-election of Mr. McKinley. the fiction writer. He has two publishers at<br /> Both of the present nominees of the two great hand, Mr. Frohman and the printer. He may<br /> parties were also the leaders in the struggle of play one against the other with a good deal of<br /> 1896-a fact which will probably tend to decrease advantage to himself and to his work. The serial<br /> the quantity of campaign literature of the per- publication of Mr. Zangwill&#039;s latest novel, for<br /> sonal and biographical type. And moreover, the example, has been arranged with careful reference<br /> issues, as well as the candidates, are familiar to to the time of the production of its dramatic<br /> the rank and file of the voters. Public interest version in the fall; the play will be produced on<br /> in newspaper politics will be discounted, and the the stage, it is said, before the concluding chapters<br /> output of political pamphlets and tracts should be of the story have been produced in type. Such<br /> comparatively meagre—which may be good news a scheme, and similar schemes which doubtless<br /> to British authors who look with longing eyes at will be planned, place the theatrical manager in<br /> the American literary market.<br /> direct and close business relations with the pub-<br /> The present tendency of our reading public, of lisher. It can be readily conjectured that the<br /> course, is all for China and the Orient. “East- author must profit from this expansion of his<br /> ward ho!” cries the American publisher, and audience.<br /> searches madly for a novel dealing with life under Nor can these developments be without their<br /> the mandarins. Our presses are grinding out curious effect upon the texture and character of<br /> reprints of the best books about China and the current fiction. The popular novelist must<br /> East which have been published recently in compose with the odour of grease, paint, and<br /> England, and the editors of our popular periodicals scene varnish in his literary nostrils. The unfor-<br /> are paying startling prices for articles of travel tunate critic, who is compelled to cope with our<br /> and adventure in the Yellow Empire. The present ordinary or extraordinary fiction of to-day, may<br /> crisis seems to have discovered our publishers imagine that he detects this already. Mr.<br /> very ill prepared, although there has been no Frohman and his syndicate are affecting the<br /> lack of signs of the imperial struggle, which book trade and the profession of author. It may<br /> could be read even in an unimperial democracy. be fanciful to look forward, along these lines, to<br /> At any rate, the disappearance of the Khaki hue an entrenchment of the favoured novelist&#039;s posi-<br /> of our current reading can hardly fail to be tion behind the protection of the theatrical<br /> gratifying<br /> managers, from which he would be able to dictate<br /> more equitable terms to the publishers—it may<br /> NEXT Season&#039;s THEATRES.<br /> be fanciful, but it is an enchanting picture.<br /> No little literary interest is excited by a survey<br /> of the work laid out for the coming season by BETTER DAYS IN THE Book TRADE.<br /> American theatrical managers. The plural is The financial entanglements in which two very<br /> used for reasons which are rhetorical rather than prominent American publishing houses struggled<br /> real. The theatrical manager of the United last year seem to have brought about a healthy<br /> States is Mr. Charles Frohman, the more or less reaction in the trade, which redounds somewhat<br /> intelligent head of a more or less unintelligent to the advantage of the author. It has induced<br /> syndicate in control of most of the actors, publishers to suspect that the writers of books<br /> actresses, playhouses, and playwrights in the are important factors in the production of them-<br /> country. The striking feature of Mr. Frohinan&#039;s a truism which was slighted in some long-<br /> prospectus is the importance assigned therein to established houses where the imprint of the<br /> dramatisations of popular books. Of all Mr. publisher was regarded as of far more signi.<br /> Frohman&#039;s “stars &#039; the two which have made ficance than the author&#039;s name on the title-page.<br /> the most money for him have been Miss Maude Of course, in estimating the success of the<br /> Adams and Mr. William Gillette. The former younger American publishers who have come to<br /> has played for three enormously successful years the front during the last decade, one must not<br /> in &quot;The Little Minister,” while Mr. Gillette, in forget to credit them with that modern business<br /> Dr. Doyle&#039;s “Sherlock Holmes,” has made a push, and that sympathetic acquaintance with the<br /> record of two hundred packed houses in New temper of our people, which the older houses<br /> York, with the provinces uniried. “Red lacked. They are not burdened with complicated<br /> Pottage,” « Richard Carvel,” “ Janice Meredith,” business machinery, and with creaking and dusty<br /> are a few of the novels which Mr. Frohman pro- methods of reaching the outside world in any<br /> poses to exploit behind the footlights.<br /> direction. The relations of the newer publishers<br /> The significance of this sort of thing has been with their authors display the same freedom and<br /> noted, but one may doubt whether it is fully quickness in achieving direct results, and they do<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> 1<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 48 (#74) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 48<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> not keep writers “in stock,&quot; as it were, until the<br /> PARIS LETTER.<br /> unfortunate men of letters become parts of the<br /> business routine, like persons who add columns of<br /> m 5, rue Chomel.<br /> figures in the counting-room. All this is an M HE celebrated chirographist, Mme. de<br /> encouraging sign. It makes for an equitable<br /> Thèbes, has recently published au interest-<br /> co-operation between author and publisher upon - ing work entitled “L’Enigme de la main.”<br /> a practical and business-like basis, an excellent Mme. de Thèbes is no vulgar adventuress seeking<br /> substitute for the old-fashioned sentimental rela- renown or wealth. She is a widely known and<br /> tion, which was presumed once to exist and which highly respectable personage who enjoys a Euro-<br /> meant so little latterly, in many cases when actual pean reputation. Casts of the hands of her most<br /> property rights were concerned.<br /> interesting clientèle (including a large number of<br /> A curious and suggestive state of affairs in a representative men and women of the present<br /> publishing business was disclosed here recently. day) are to be seen in her small suite of rooms,<br /> It seems that it has been the custom of the firm, situated within stone-throw of the Arc de<br /> after a book was printed and published, to store Triomphe. The hand of her friend and master,<br /> the plates and carry them on to its inventory at Alexandre Dumas fils, here reposes in solitary<br /> the cost of manufacture. It made not a particle state under a glass case. The pointed fingers<br /> of difference that, for publishing purposes, the and huge hand of Dumas père, clasping the<br /> book was dead and gone, and the plates worth slender, narrow hand of the mother of his son, is<br /> nothing more than their value as old metal. also easily recognisable. It lies carelessly on a<br /> They stood on the list of assets as representing side-table, surrounded by scores of plaster and<br /> the sum expended in composition and casting; bronze models of the characteristic hands of<br /> this might be six or seven hundred dollars, modern celebrities. Among the latter the obsti-<br /> entirely fictitious. The older the house and the nate hand of M. Emile Zola; the impassive<br /> more antiquated the plates, then the less substan- hand of Mme. Christine Nilsson; the dominating,<br /> tial would such assets become. But on the house caressing band of Mme. Sarah Bernhardt; the<br /> ledgers they would represent capital, and moneys enigmatical hand of M. Edouard Drumont; and<br /> invested, and there would be no denying the fact the energetic hand of Coquelin imperiously attract<br /> that the plates were in existence and in a good attention.<br /> state of preservation. It is needless to expatiate Mme. de Thèbes is a woman of imposing figure,<br /> upon the borrowing value of such securities. penetrating glance, and stately presence. Hers<br /> is palmistry, pure and simple-no fatalistic craft<br /> AUTHORS Who Own THE PLATES.<br /> reducing the individual will to a valueless factor.<br /> That the author should himself own outright “God,&quot; so she asserts, “has placed in each of<br /> the plates of his books is a favourite theory our hands the road.map of our life. If He has<br /> among American writers. In practice it is a done this, it is that we may make use of the<br /> luxury which is not for the ordinary, but Mr. information thus given. This map warns us of<br /> Howells and others, I believe, have found it an the accidents which menace us ; of our con-<br /> effective and simple plan in their efforts towards stitutional weaknesses; and of the defects in our<br /> establishing a reasonable status of literary nature. We are thus put on our guard to<br /> property.<br /> struggle against our bad inclinations. This is so<br /> The last canvass of the best selling books in true that, if we struggle, the lines in our road-<br /> this country, elaborately prepared by the Book- map will change.” From which fact she argues<br /> man, testifies to the overgrown popularity of that that our first duty is to know ourselves, or rather,<br /> ingenious novel “ To Have and to Hold,&quot; which to know how to decipher the hieroglyphics traced<br /> heads the list. Next come two English stories, on our hands by a Divine agency. The study is<br /> “Sophia&quot; by Weyman, and “Red Pottage.” The interesting, even though unaccompanied by the<br /> phases of life in Miss Cholmondeley&#039;s book are so blind credulity which will strain at a gnat to<br /> essentially and modernly English that the swallow a camel.<br /> American vogue of her story must be set down as<br /> a tribute to her art. After “Red Pottage&quot; on the<br /> “LA FILLE DE GEORGE SAND.&quot;.<br /> Bookman&#039;s list appear in order : “ Unleavened Such is the title of a most entertaining little<br /> Bread,&quot; a new and promising American novel by booklet published by M. Georges d&#039;Heylli for the<br /> Robert Grant, “Resurrection,” and “ The edification of a select coterie of friends. The<br /> Farringdons.” Our public&#039;s taste, if not dis author is the son-in-law of the venerable Mme.<br /> criminating, is at least encouragingly catholic to Bascans, proprietress of the school in which the<br /> the aspiring novelist abroad.<br /> wayward little Solange was brought up. Every<br /> John RUSSELL DAVIDSON. letter written by the illustrious mother was care-<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 49 (#75) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 49<br /> fully guarded by the old schoolmistress. It is “ Clotilde de Lusignan,” for the sum of 2000<br /> amusing to note the logical, convincing manner in francs. This liberal remuneration is to be received<br /> which the celebrated novelist explains the method as follows: 500 francs in notes payable at a year&#039;s<br /> of education she desires to be adopted for her date ; 500 francs in notes (payable six months<br /> daughter, and the results to be obtained there- later) at the moment when twelve hundred copies<br /> from. A little later we find all these fine theories of the work in question shall have been sold.<br /> evaporating in thin air on being put to the test. The remaining 1000 francs are to be paid in notes,<br /> George Sand has, undoubtedly, written exquisite likewise dated six months hence--whenever sieur<br /> pages on maternal love; she might, and did, Grégoire Hubert shall be unable to produce on<br /> exercise a wide influence on her contemporaries the author&#039;s demand more than a hundred copies<br /> and on posterity ; nevertheless, she failed signally of this first edition !<br /> in obtaining either reverence or obedience from<br /> her own daughter. Twenty-four hours of Solange&#039;s<br /> SHEARING THE SHorn.<br /> company invariably ended in a scene and the basty But the final article in this iniquitous treaty<br /> return of the offender to Mme. Bascans&#039; charge, carries off the palm for munificence. It expressly<br /> usually accompanied by a note couched in some- states that:<br /> what the following terms:<br /> “In this sum (of 2000 francs) is included the<br /> “This morning Solange has been unbearable, cost of the advertisement of the said work,<br /> She cries because I will not arrange her curl. which M. Balzac binds and engages himself to<br /> papers, and resists when I attempt to do so. If have inserted in the journals below mentioned (or<br /> she arrive after ten o&#039;clock, I beg you will punish in those which may replace them should they<br /> her. She has been incessantly urged to hasten be suppressed), viz., the Constitutionnel, the<br /> without its having any effect on her movements. Journal des Débats, the Courrier, the Miroir, the<br /> . . . Mme. Bascans will have the kindness to Quotidienne, and the theatrical papers. The<br /> explain to her the naughtiness of her conduct.” advertisements shall each occupy at least half a<br /> * The perusal of these letters,&quot; writes a French column in the body of the journal; and shall be<br /> critic, “ will be a consolation to those women who placed either beside the article ‘Paris,&#039; or immedi-<br /> possess only a little good sense and not anyately after.” To reimburse him for this outlay,<br /> the author is entitled to six copies gratis of his<br /> A CRUEL CONTRACT.<br /> own work!<br /> On Aug. 18, 1900, the Lévy copyright of the Comment is superfluous. In 1848 the tax on<br /> novels of Honoré de Balzac expires, and this the serial novel (which led to its temporary<br /> immense work becomes public property. Some suppression) reduced Balzac to the last extremity.<br /> idea of its value may be gained from the fact that He continued to occupy the elegant hotel fur-<br /> in 1865 (after thirty years&#039; continuous re-editing) nished by Mme. de Hanska ; but he indulged in<br /> M. Michel Lévy paid 80,000 francs to the great boiled beef only once a week, eking out the<br /> man&#039;s widow for the right of being sole remaining days with the meagre broth obtained<br /> publisher during a period of thirty-five years. in cooking the above delicacy. It was probably<br /> The petty remuneration originally doled out to at this epoch that he wrote:<br /> the author for the majority of these brilliant “Creditors know how to find us much better<br /> masterpieces of French literature is truly absurd. and more promptly than our friends. For the<br /> Generous and prodigal as the elder Dumas, no sake of a little sum they often come to a place<br /> man was ever more at the mercy of his pub. where others do not come for the sake of a great<br /> lishers. Instances of his colossal extravagance, affection.”<br /> on several occasions, are not lacking. They were, He died two years later, Aug. 18, 1850.<br /> however, counterbalanced by his extraordinary<br /> fertility. Yet it is not surprising that, despite<br /> AN IDEAL HISTORIAN.<br /> his brilliant reputation, this modern Shakespeare M. Frédéric Masson is an ideal historian.<br /> of French fiction died a poor and completely Dramatic as the English Froude (and thoroughly<br /> worn-out man at the comparatively early age of reliable), he is marvellously successful in his<br /> fifty-one years, when his business inability was conscientious resuscitation and portrayal of a<br /> as mercilessly exploited as is witnessed by the bygone epoch, and the men and women who<br /> Hubert contract, which document is now in the formed it. His third volume of “Napoléon et sa<br /> possession of the Vicomte de Lovenjoul. In this famille” has closely followed its predecessor.<br /> contract “M. Honoré Balzac&quot; engages to supply The contrast between the first Napoleon and his<br /> (under the pseudonym of Lord R’Noone) a certain brother-that political Winkle Joseph, King of<br /> sieur Grégoire Hubert, libraire au Palais Royal, Spain-is pungently drawn. The latter possessed<br /> with four volumes for publication, entitled the overweening self-confidence, minus the genius,<br /> genius.”<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 50 (#76) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 50<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> of the great Bonaparte. He passed his time in thoughtful, conscientious writer, and does his<br /> elaborating a series of military mancuvres which level best to be impartial. At least, that was the<br /> failed signally when put into execution. Imme- impression left on my mind after the basty<br /> diately one stratagem proved abortive, he set to perusal of a few pages of his new volume, includ-<br /> work to devise a second still more impracticable. ing the chapter entitled “Les Dessous de Joe<br /> “What alone saved Joseph from the consequences Chamberlain.&quot;<br /> of his extraordinary combinations,&quot; writes M.<br /> Masson,&quot; was that nobody obeyed him. Marshal<br /> MM. DE REGNIER AND LUCIEN MUHLFELD.<br /> Moncey received with extreme politeness the Contrary to general expectation, M. Henri de<br /> aide-de-camp who bore the royal commands, Regnier has this year undertaken the lecturing<br /> showed the absurdity of the movement ordered, tour in the United States. He appears to have<br /> and terminated by saying, “The Emperor, sir, had great success. A well-known critic has<br /> has not entrusted me with one of his finest asserted that, though this young writer occupies<br /> regiments to compromise thus his glory and a high position among the rising generation of<br /> safety. Return to the King. Inform him of authors, his success in the poetical medium is<br /> what I have said ; and tell him that, neverthe considerably hampered by his incorrigible predi.<br /> less, should he persist, I will give the example lection for making a word in the singular rhyme<br /> that I should give of the most implicit obedience.&quot; with a word in the plural, and by his indulgence<br /> Besinères invariably affirmed that he would obey in various minor idiosyncrasies of the same<br /> immediately; that his duty, inclination, and stamp.<br /> respect impelled him to do so; and, that said, he His talented compatriot, M. Lucien Muhlfeld,<br /> acted as he chose. As to Ney, he roundly replied, also possesses a marked individuality. A year<br /> “ This order undoubtedly comes from a man who ago he published his first novel, entitled “Le<br /> understands nothing of our trade. The Emperor Mauvais Desir&quot;; and, at the present moment,<br /> has given me an army corps with which to conquer “La Carrière d&#039;André Tourette&quot; has consolidated<br /> and not to capitulate. Tell the King I have not his reputation as a novelist. It would be difficult<br /> come to Spain to play Dupont&#039;s rôle !” The to find a more complete and comprehensive study<br /> book may be obtained chez Ollendorff.<br /> of the career of an ordinary young man of<br /> bourgeois origin, or a more subtle and conscien-<br /> Two INTERESTING PUBLICATIONS.<br /> tious delineation of the multitudinous types of<br /> “Every year the tuberculose&#039; kills in France characters to be met with to-day in the various<br /> 150,000 persons-a population equal to that of grades of society.<br /> Rouen and Nantes,” is the startling assertion<br /> imprinted beneath the title-head of a new paper,<br /> APROPOS OF FRENCH DRAMATISTS.<br /> Curre Antituberculeuse, which has just been M. Jean Richepin—first-rate gymnast, play-<br /> started, edited by MM. Sersiron and Dumarest. writer, and poet—is enjoying a well-earned<br /> The object of this publication is to awaken all holiday in Palma. M. Maurice Donnay is reposing<br /> classes to the necessity of taking strong measures in “a marvellous country” in the Villa Lysis<br /> to check the increasing tendency of the populace (Agay in the Var), which boasts a garden as full<br /> to consumption; also, to set forth the best means of blossoms as an opera star&#039;s box—minus the<br /> of preventing and counteracting contagion. The card pinned to each bouquet. He is meditating<br /> movement is being warmly supported. A com. a new “ scénario” beside the violet sea ; and has<br /> mittee has been formed, and large sums have recently requested a friend to announce that the<br /> already been subscribed to found popular right of performing his latest play, “L’Education<br /> sanatoriums wherein to isolate, and endeavour to d&#039;un Prince,&quot; has been bought by Belgium, Italy,<br /> cure, the consumptive working-class adults of and America. M. Pierre Decourcelle is rejoicing<br /> Paris who are sufficiently affected to spread the in his new decoration, and in the revival at the<br /> contagion --but are still well enough to perform Ambigu Theatre of his “ Deux Gosses&quot;_which<br /> wearily their daily task. The first list of dona- play formerly broke the standing record of five<br /> tions received (published by the Euvre Anti- hundred nights, having been performed 758 con-<br /> tuberculeuse) amounted to a total of 316,000 secutive times at the above theatre (1896-1898).<br /> francs. A good beginning!<br /> M. Georges Feydeau is still to be seen on the<br /> “L&#039;A ugleterre et l’Imperialisme” is the title of grands boulevards. Elegant, sedate, and dignified,<br /> M. Victor Bérard&#039;s latest work, which is being the combined verdict of the German and English<br /> widely read. It is interesting as giving us a censors, who pilloried his “ Dame de chez Maxim&quot;<br /> glimpse of the British character and policy seen as a production injurious to the morals of the<br /> through French spectacles. M. Bérard is un spectators, has in no wise disturbed his tran-<br /> doubtedly prejudiced. Nevertheless, he is a quility. At the present moment the triple revival<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 51 (#77) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 51<br /> of the offending play and two others of the same The early experience of Stevenson with the<br /> type, at the Nouveautés, Palais-Royal, and Bouffes Century is, however, only a typical case, and not<br /> theatres, are pecuniarily justifying their author&#039;s by any means unique. While it is no doubt true<br /> popularity with the respective managers of these that the great magazines do desire to discover<br /> establishments. M. Feydeau has been engaged unknown writers of promise, they none of them<br /> for some time past on a new play, of which only offer them unreservedly much consideration and<br /> a few unimportant details have yet leaked out. encouragement.<br /> M. Edmond Rostand is likewise reported to Again, most of the magazines are like Self<br /> have a new play on hand, dealing with the perse. Culture, practically made up for six months in<br /> cution of the early Christians under Nero. The advance, à fact that the literary aspirant does<br /> principal feminine röle is designed for Mme. not know, and not knowing is seriously handi.<br /> Sarah Bernhardt.<br /> capped. The editor of a great magazine is in<br /> A Dual DISAPPOINTMENT.<br /> part obliged to provide for future publication<br /> from the very fact of unnecessary absence from<br /> The reconstruction of the Comédie Française is home in Europe and elsewhere in search of attrac-<br /> proceediag but slowly. “Play in a barn as<br /> Molière did,&quot; was the advice of M. Victorien<br /> tions. This is editorially the case with the<br /> Ladies&#039; Home Journal, and contributions during<br /> Sardou ; but bis suggestion was dismissed as<br /> proxy editorship must be left to the tender mercies<br /> impracticable. The revival of the magnificent of the one upon whom the real editor&#039;s mantle<br /> “ Patrie&quot; of the latter author has been postponed<br /> has fallen, but whose power is small.<br /> owing to lack of suitable accommodation, deco- The Book Buver, the Bookman, and the Critic,<br /> ration, &amp;c. M. Paladilhe, composer of the<br /> as organs of book publishers, all occupy special<br /> music which accompanies this famous drama, fields, and from their very nature as such<br /> made his debut at sixteen years with a Neapolitan<br /> organs are all surrounded by conditions that are<br /> song, entitled “ Mandolinata,” which instantly<br /> peculiar, and that do not count in favour of the<br /> became the success of the day. It brought fifty<br /> htnpty<br /> lite<br /> literary aspirant. They are alike erratic in<br /> francs to its author, and a million to its pub.<br /> puo various ways. They are hedged about against<br /> lisher. The music of the splendid lyrical poem<br /> the innocent or inexperienced writer as Job in<br /> being written by M. Victorien Sardou (in<br /> his prosperity was hedged about against the<br /> collaboration with M. Gheusi) for the Antique<br /> intique machinations of the Evil One. The necessity for<br /> Theatre of Orange in 1901, has been intrusted to<br /> ced to considering and booming the authors of books<br /> considering<br /> M. Camille Saint-Saëns.<br /> published by their respective firms, while not<br /> The productions of M. Henry Kistemaeckers<br /> entirely paramount, has more influence than<br /> appear doomed to misfortune, his rehearsals<br /> might be supposed by those who do not know.<br /> having again been interrupted. The success of<br /> In practice it will surely be found that thoughts<br /> M. Janvier&#039;s new play “Francine, ou le respect de<br /> of literary aspirants seldom if ever flit with<br /> l&#039;innocence&quot; (Athénée theatre) - which has<br /> cordiality across the editorial sun disks of any of<br /> obtained the unanimous approval of the entire<br /> these mediums.<br /> French Press—is responsible for the mishap.<br /> The Metropolitan Magazine has a staff that is<br /> This time M. Kistemaeckers appears to have<br /> expected to provide the material it uses. Some<br /> accepted his fate with resignation.<br /> journals also doing business on this plan hesitate<br /> DARRACOTTE Scott.<br /> not to reject a contribution offered, and then to<br /> work up the idea derived therefrom, through<br /> their own staff, to the detriment of the aspirant.<br /> NOTES FROM THE “BULLETIN OF THE<br /> It is not easy for an unknown aspirant to enter<br /> the editorial department of Frank Leslie&#039;s<br /> SOCIETY OF AMERICAN AUTHORS.&quot;<br /> Popular Monthly. If the coming guest is not<br /> welcomed, the departing one is cordially speeded.<br /> THE MAGAZINES AND THE ASPIRANT.<br /> The Art Amateur has a frosty temperature for<br /> THE Home Journal does not welcome the those unknown to the editor. Disappointed ones<br /> literary aspirant, and if he calls, the air of may weep if they choose outside the office doors.<br /> the editor is distrait in interview,<br /> The Art Interchange is far more considerate, but<br /> The Broadway Magazine cheerfully admits the editor of the Interchange is an expert on<br /> to the visiting aspirant that it is not very serious, reading character and literary ability by means<br /> and will have none of the manuscripts of those of handwriting and of physiognomy, so that he<br /> who are.<br /> can tell by reading your letter, offering a contri.<br /> The Century, Scribner&#039;s, and Harper&#039;s all do bution, or by looking at you carelessly if you call,<br /> sometimes open their doors to literary aspirants. whether your stuff is likely to be available, with-<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 52 (#78) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 52<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> out the trouble of reading the material. Con that the photograph was inartistic and not a<br /> tributors must call for payments, unless otherwise proper subject for copyright. The judge gave<br /> arranged.<br /> this question, as one of fact, to the jury to deter-<br /> The editorial management of Ev&#039;ry Month is mine, and they found for the defendants. Zulker,<br /> new. The editor is pleasant, but he is very limited Sweet, and Loeb, manufacturers of a household<br /> in his appropriations for contributions. The preparation, were the defendants. Jacob Schloss<br /> agreed cheque is, however, promptly sent subse- the photographer, the plaintiff; the suit being<br /> quent to publication.<br /> brought by the counsel for the Copyright<br /> The management of Success is ordinarily not League.<br /> very considerate of literary aspirants. Their un.<br /> A QUESTION OF COPYRIGHT.<br /> solicited offerings of manuscripts are very nume. Two famous books figure in court just now,<br /> rous, and their examinations are at times some- and upon them depends a question of copyright<br /> what slow, which is often a serious item to the of great interest to publishers, as well as to<br /> writer who depends upon the sale of his manu. writers and the reading public. One of these is<br /> scripts for income.<br /> Oliver Wendell Holmes&#039;s “ The Professor at the<br /> The Home Magazine will fastidiously consider Breakfast Table,&quot; the other Mrs. Harriet Beecher<br /> anything offered, especially if accompanied with Stowe&#039;s “ The Minister&#039;s Wooing.”<br /> illustrations, but its compensation rates are low. A suit has been brought by Houghton, Mifflin<br /> Munsey&#039;s says “Yes,” and means “ No.” As and Co. to enjoin R. H. White and Co. from<br /> is the case with others, a beautifully printed form selling the first-named work, and another to<br /> is used to reject manuscripts, that upon receipt enjoin Houghton and Dutton from disposing of<br /> consoles those whose funds grow low and whose the latter. The publishers assert that the sale of<br /> hearts grow sick waiting and hoping for long. these books by the respondents is a violation of<br /> delayed cheques almost as much as if the cheque copyright.<br /> itself had come. Some authors collect these The works involving the present suits were<br /> forms as others do postage stamps.<br /> published serially in the Atlantic Monthly in<br /> The Churchman has not time for anyone. 1858, and the publishers were apparently neglect-<br /> except it be a specialist. No literary aspirants ful in securing copyright. It now appears that a<br /> need apply.<br /> valid copyright was secured on the last issue of<br /> The Gentlewoman gets many of its features<br /> the year, December, 1859, and “The Minister&#039;s<br /> from Europe. It is well for the would-be con- Wooing” was published in book form and pro-<br /> tributor to remember this fact in doing business perly entered for copyright before the publication<br /> with the magazine. The editor is seldom at the in the Atlantic Monthly of the last thirteen<br /> office, and the rush and crush is thereby avoided chapters.<br /> by her.<br /> The respondents demurred from the bill. The<br /> There are many magazines, like the Impres. demurrer is based on three contentions, viz.: That<br /> sionist, the (new) Criterion, the Ledger Monthly:<br /> “The Professor at the Breakfast Table” was<br /> a few of the trade papers and others, that pay a<br /> printed serially in the magazine under a title<br /> cent per word or thereabouts, which is a good totally different from the recorded title of the<br /> average rate.<br /> magazine number in question ; that no notice of<br /> the copyright of the Atlantic Monthly was given<br /> Two COPYRIGHT Decisions.<br /> on the published copies containing the instalments<br /> A curious copyright decision was rendered by of the story in question, and that the copyrights<br /> the Supreme Court in the case of Bolles v. of said magazine number, even if valid, expired in<br /> &quot; Outing.” The judges decreed that the statutory 1897.<br /> damage could only be collected on copies infring-<br /> ing the copyright actually found in the possession<br /> of the defendant at the time the action was<br /> THE AUTHORS&#039; CLUB.<br /> announced, nothing being collectable on copies<br /> previously distributed and sold; a decision that M HE last dinner of the Authors&#039; Club for the<br /> would, in most cases of copyright infringement,<br /> present season was held on July 2. Mr.<br /> make the law inoperative, as publishers do not Frankfort Moore took the chair, and Mr.<br /> keep more publications in their possession than Walter Macfarren was the guest of the evening.<br /> are actually necessary.<br /> The speeches were excellent. The Lyric Glee<br /> Another copyright decision of interest to Singers gave the club a delightful entertainment,<br /> publishers is that in the case of a poster made by singing Mr. Walter Macfarren&#039;s four part songs.<br /> the defendants from a copyrighted photograph of As a finish to the season the evening was most<br /> a chorus girl. The defendants&#039; counsel claimed successful. The directors of the Authors&#039; Club,<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 53 (#79) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 53<br /> and the Club, may congratulate themselves on the<br /> Monday night dinners during the past winter and<br /> spring, as they can reckon among the club guests<br /> some of the most distinguished people in England,<br /> among whom were the following: The Lord Chan-<br /> cellor, the Lord Mayor, the Commander-in-Chief,<br /> the Bishop of London, the French and American<br /> Ambassadors, the Swedish and Norwegian and<br /> Chinese Ministers, Sir George Trevelyan, Mr.<br /> Leslie Stephen, Mr. Bryce, General Sir Evelyn<br /> Wood, Sir Herbert Maxwell, Sir Walter Foster,<br /> Sir Donald Mackenzie Wallace, Sir Alma Tadema,<br /> the President of the Royal Academy (Sir E.<br /> Poynter), Lord Strathcona, Sir Robert Ball, Mr.<br /> E. F. Knight, and Mr. Alfred Austin.<br /> CIVIL LIST PENSIONS.<br /> of Margaret of Navarre.” Mr. Muir and Mr. Leycester<br /> prosecuted, and Mr. Biron defended. Inspector Arrow<br /> ransacked the premises in question and removed two cab<br /> loads, but he was unable to find more than two books upon<br /> which to base a prosecution. As to one of these, “ His<br /> Excellency Eugene Rougon,&quot; the grand jury threw out<br /> the bill. Mr. Biron ridiculed the idea that “ The<br /> Heptameron&quot; was an obscene work. It was a classic<br /> historical work, he said, and was to be found in every<br /> library of note. It was a perfectly lawful publication,<br /> illustrative of the literatare and manners of the Middle<br /> Ages. The defendant had carried on a most respectable<br /> business both in Booksellers’-row and near Temple Bar,<br /> where the seizure was made, and he submitted that the<br /> prosecution was a most vindictive one on the part of the<br /> police, and wholly unjustifiable. The Common Sergeant,<br /> in summing up the case to the jury, said the only question<br /> for them was whether the work was of a lewd and lascivious<br /> character, manifestly calculated to corrupt public morals.<br /> They did not require the Vigilance Association or the police,<br /> or even critics of literary style and antiquarian research, to<br /> decide that question. A great deal depended on the time,<br /> place, and circumstances of the publication. It was a<br /> matter of common knowledge that in the writings of many<br /> respectable people, ecclesiastics, students, and others of<br /> past ages, there were passages the wholesale publication of<br /> which would not now be tolerated, yet which no one would<br /> wish to destroy or mutilate, inasmuch as in their proper<br /> place and properly used they were of great value to the<br /> student and the historian. The sole question for the jury<br /> was whether the book in the form in which it was published<br /> and advertised was calculated to corrupt public morals, and<br /> the jury must judge of the case as men of the world without<br /> leaning to a prurient morality on the one hand, or a prurient<br /> laxity on the other. The jury, after some deliberation,<br /> acquitted accused, and she was discharged.<br /> In the case of Charley Haines, otherwise Reid, committed<br /> from Tottenham on a charge of selling “ The Heptameron,&quot;<br /> Mr. Muir, after the verdict in the previous case, offered no<br /> evidence, and a verdict of not guilcy was returned. Mr.<br /> Purcell appeared for the accused, who was discharged. Mr.<br /> Muir, in justification of the action of the police, said that<br /> earlier in the year a man was prosecuted for selling the<br /> same work, and pleading guilty was sentenced.<br /> Observe that the inspector ransacked the<br /> premises—he was probably acting on information<br /> and was within his rights. He carried off “ two<br /> cab loads ” of books. That is to say he deprived<br /> a bookseller for a certain time, pending the<br /> return of the books, of his means of livelihood.<br /> He found, among the two cab loads, two on which<br /> to base a prosecution. The first was “ His<br /> Excellency Eugene Rougon.” The grand jury<br /> threw out the bill as regards this book. Other-<br /> wise the grand jury would have been an ass<br /> indeed. There remained the “Heptameron of<br /> Margaret of Navarre.” If this book is to be<br /> made the subject of a prosecution, Shakespeare,<br /> Ben Jonson, Butler&#039;s Hudibras, Burton&#039;s Anatomy,<br /> Dryden, Walt Whitman, the Cent Nouvelles Nou-<br /> velles, Boccaccio, and Heaven knows what besides,<br /> will have to vanish from the bookseller&#039;s shelves.<br /> The jury, happily, acquitted the accused. But<br /> what bookseller is safe? The next thing, perhaps,<br /> will be a raid upon the private library.<br /> NHE complete list of Pensions granted during<br /> the year ending June 20, 1900, and charged<br /> upon the Civil List, has been published.<br /> The whole amount at the disposal of the First<br /> Lord of the Treasury has been expended. The<br /> following is an analysis of the grants :<br /> Art (sculpture, painting, and singing) £300<br /> Science (archæology, submarine tele-<br /> graphy, mathematics, hygiene,<br /> Antarctic exploration)........<br /> Literature.................................... 550<br /> Pensions which have nothing to do<br /> with either Literature, Science, or<br /> Art, and have no claims, therefore,<br /> upon this Fund ........................ 105<br /> Cannot the Committee procure an amendment<br /> of the resolution so that it should include persons<br /> with claims depending on achievements in Litera-<br /> ture, Science, and Art only? This seems the<br /> only way of putting a definite stop either to the<br /> jobs which formerly disgraced the List or the<br /> little nibblings which are now allowed every year<br /> in favour of persons whose claims may be very<br /> strong, but are not literary, scientific, or artistic.<br /> 245<br /> THE POLICE AS CENSORS.<br /> THE following case was published in the<br /> Newsagent and Booksellers&#039; Review.<br /> PROSECUTION OR PERSECUTION ?<br /> Ridiculous Charges against Booksellers.<br /> At the Central Criminal Court, London, last week, Mabel<br /> Florence Thomson, manageress and secretary of a publishing<br /> company in Booksellers&#039;.row, surrendered to her bail to<br /> answer an indictment charging ber with having pablished<br /> an alleged obscene libel, a book entitled “The Heptameron<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 54 (#80) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 54<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> The mournful part of the business is that early<br /> in the present year a man was prosecuted at the<br /> instance of the police for selling the same book,<br /> and, pleading guilty, was fined.<br /> On the other hand, let us ask how it is that<br /> certain shops in some parts of the West End are<br /> allowed to flaunt in their windows every kind of<br /> picture and title which can possible invite prosecu-<br /> tion--and escape scot free, while these small<br /> dealers, who happen to have a classic in which are<br /> certain coarse passages, are harried and haled<br /> before magistrates, and have to look on while their<br /> stock-in-trade, proved to be perfectly innocent,<br /> is forcibly carried off in four-wheeled cabs.<br /> this city who is a living link between the events<br /> of the middle of this century and of its close this<br /> year. His experiences, therefore, must be of a<br /> particularly interesting kind, and those that he<br /> recounted before the Authors&#039; Society, flavoured as<br /> they were with personal allusions, were well<br /> received. As Mr. Karkaria suggested at the<br /> gathering, these reminiscences of a very active and<br /> many-sided career would be not only pleasant<br /> but instructive and edifying reading if Mr.<br /> Kabraji were to put them on paper and publish<br /> them in a book. We wish the Authors&#039; Society<br /> success, and hope it will fulfil its object of<br /> increasing friendship and intercourse among<br /> native writers.— Bombay Gazette, June 9.<br /> BOMBAY SOCIETY OF AUTHORS.<br /> CORRESPONDENCE.<br /> TT is an encouraging sign of the times that the<br /> Parsi authors and journalists of Bombay 1. — CONCERNING ENGLISH AUTHORS IN THE<br /> have formed a “ Society of Authors ” more<br /> UNITED STATES.<br /> or less on the model of the well-known association T HAVE long felt the helplessness of English<br /> established some years ago in London. That authors in the hands of American pub.<br /> society is the first of its kind in England, though lishers. How good soever our agreements<br /> in France “ La Société des Gens de Lettres ” has may be, we have no means of seeing them carried<br /> now existed for over sixty years, and has done out. The experience of others probably tallies<br /> much good to its members as well as the literary with my own, though I have seen no complaint<br /> profession in general. Our local society also bids in The Author or elsewhere. I would propose<br /> fair to be useful and successful as it is in that our society should have an agent or an<br /> enthusiastic and able hands. The veteran Parsi agency in New York, with full powers from<br /> author, Mr. K. R. Cama, who in the present year individual writers to examine—as far as existing<br /> finishes the Psalmist&#039;s limit of three score and laws permit - either the books of publishers<br /> ten, and who is as vigorous and enthusiastic in his or the price-lists, advertisements, and sales of<br /> literary schemes as ever, is the president, and each work, and forward half-yearly statements of<br /> Mr. K. N. Kabraji, the veteran Parsi journalist, the same to authors, who, of course, would be<br /> is the vice-president. The new society performed charged some fee. This is merely a rough and<br /> a very pleasing function the other day by sketchy idea that might be thought out in<br /> inviting a very select and cultured party of detail and improved and amplified by the<br /> authors and authoresses—for Parsi lady-writers collective mind of the Incorporated Authors,<br /> have also joined the society-and their friends to should they see the utility of such an agent or<br /> an afternoon party to meet their vice-president, agency<br /> Mr. Kabraji, before his departure for England It would be well, perhaps, to impart my<br /> to-day. The most interesting part of the pro- experience with regard to “ The Last Sentence,&quot;<br /> ceedings was the speech in which this veteran a novel published by Mr. Heinemann in 1893,<br /> journalist recounted his experiences of over forty after running in Great Thoughts. Accord-<br /> years in his profession. Mr. Kabraji commenced ing to my rule, I retained the copyright of this<br /> his connection with the native Press in the pre- novel, and empowered Messrs. Lovell and Co. to<br /> Mutiny days, and all the great landmarks of publish it in the United States for me on con.<br /> recent Indian history have passed under his eyes. dition of paying me a stipulated royalty. The<br /> He witnessed the Mutiny, heard the Queen&#039;s Pro novel sold well on both sides, and I received sub-<br /> clamation proclaimed with due pomp and cere- stantial cheques from America as well as England.<br /> mony in Nov. 1858, saw the preparations in But Messrs. Lovell and Co. became bankrupt,<br /> Bombay for the Abyssinian and Afgban Wars, and, without consulting me-as I believe, illegally<br /> was present at the Grand Durbar where the -transferred this rigbt or sub-let this right of<br /> Queen was proclaimed Empress of India, took publishing to firm after firm, all of which, as far<br /> part in the festivities of the Jubilee of the Queen, as I can ascertain, became bankrupt, but con-<br /> He is the only journalist, native or European, in tinued to publish my novel and to send me from<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 55 (#81) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 55<br /> time to time varying sums as royalty. But I exceptional, in which case it may serve as a warn-<br /> could not obtain regular statements of sales, and ing to others.<br /> MAXWELL GRAY.<br /> seldom knew in whose hands the book was. It2, Mount Ararat-road, Richmond,<br /> was pirated, I believe, by one firm, but I really do Surrey. July 12, 1900.<br /> not quite know what happened to this book,<br /> except that it was always selling, a fact I ascer-<br /> tained sometimes by indirect means. At last I<br /> II.—“ PRINTERS&#039; ERRORS.&quot;<br /> received an intimation from the “ American It is distinctly amusing to find anyone com-<br /> Publishers&#039; Corporation” to the effect that they plaining of the printer as a tyrant. With most<br /> had the book, and furnishing a sort of genealogy authors he is a scapegoat. Whenever some<br /> of the firms through which it had descended to unusually palpable blunder appears in type it is<br /> them from Messrs. Lovell and Co. (or Proteus invariably spoken of as a &quot;printer&#039;s error.” In a<br /> and Co.). I think this was in 1897, when, I see. recent number of Truth, for instance, it was the<br /> £6 was received from them, presumably for 1896. demoniacal printer who compelled the editor to<br /> Then comes an entry in the autumn of 1898 of call Mr. Robert Lowe Lord Sherborne instead of<br /> 159. This was accompanied by an intimation Lord Sherbrooke. Perhaps, Sir, you will allow<br /> that the sale was so feeble they proposed printing me to say a word or two upon this harrowing<br /> no more copies. One would suppose this to be subject.<br /> the end of the history. Not at all. In May, In the first place, the printer has, and can<br /> 1900, I received a letter from the manager of the have, nothing whatever to do with it. The<br /> Publishers&#039; Plate Renting Company, stating that man who prints, i.e., the pressman, never, as far<br /> “ between the receivership of the American Pub. as my experience goes, sets up type. I suppose,<br /> lishers&#039; Corporation and the foreclosure sale of its therefore, that when Mr. Corbett says printer<br /> plates ... some publishing was done, and (see April number of The Author, p. 250) he<br /> any royalties earned were deposited in a trust means compositor ; that it is the compositor who<br /> company in this city. There are now on deposit presumes to alter his undeniably accurate spelling,<br /> royalties from the sale of your book amounting to and whose fault it is when a blunder defaces a<br /> about £60.”<br /> page. But I submit that this is putting the<br /> That is all I know (except that I claimed and saddle on the wrong horse. In any published<br /> received my cheque). It appears to me a singular matter, be it book or newspaper, a printer&#039;s error<br /> circumstance that whereas such sum as £6 for one (to use the expression in vogue) does not exist.<br /> year and 158. for another are all I appear to have It is an impossibility. The error is not that of<br /> received while the company was solvent, over £60 the compositor, but of the proof-reader. The<br /> result from the sales between Sept. 1898, and only place in which a printer&#039;s error can occur is in<br /> May, 1900, when the company was insolvent. I the first proof pulled; and if such error is over-<br /> am not informed of the sales or the percentage by looked, and appears in the published form, it is<br /> which my royalty came. It may be rightly the proof-reader, and not the compositor, who is<br /> calculated, or the trust company may be ignorant to blame.<br /> of my stipulated percentage. I do not impugn But who is to blame when blunders that exist<br /> the honesty or accuracy of the various firms which in the manuscript are perpetuated in the public<br /> have sold my book. I merely observe that the cation ? Here the question lies between the<br /> jump from 158. to £61 78. (the exact cheque) on publisher&#039;s reader and the author. Very often<br /> a book seven years old is remarkable. There was the reader is incompetent, and, failing to under-<br /> also a sudden decline from a cheque in three stand the author&#039;s meaning, ventures to correct<br /> figures to £2 on an earlier firm becoming solvent, his copy. A case once occurred in my own<br /> which is less remarkable. It is true that in 1898 experience. Being absent from Europe, I sent<br /> my novel, “ The House of Hidden Treasure,&quot; had home my copy in type, and of course could not<br /> a large sale in England and the United States, correct the proofs. In a certain passage I had<br /> and that may have sent up the American sale of used the expression “reification of a concept.&quot;<br /> “ The Last Sentence,&quot; though it had not that The reader had never heard of the word reifica-<br /> effect in England. But the point is that I, and I tion, and you may imagine my dismay when, on<br /> suppose all authors, except a few ubiquitous the publication of my book, I found that he had<br /> people, are helpless as a child in the matter; altered it to “ deification.&quot; Here he was wrong;<br /> and that an agent, who must be neither pub- and yet there certainly are cases in which a reader<br /> lisher nor author, to watch books in the might save the author from some of the gram-<br /> United States would be a great boon to English matica) atrocities that bring amateur authorship<br /> authors.<br /> into disrepute. A novelist or essayist who writes<br /> On the other hand, my experience may be &quot;like he does,” “different to,” or “neither of<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 56 (#82) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 56<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> them were,” splits his infinitives, and begins two far cry, and my publishers took what money was<br /> consecutive separate sentences with the word made by the sale of the book for themselves, then<br /> “but,&quot; is lucky if he finds a publisher ; but he (although the whole edition was entirely my pro-<br /> would be luckier still (and so would the public) perty) they disposed of the unsold copies to<br /> if the publisher&#039;s reader were benevolent enough another firm without informing me; and, on the<br /> to correct his English.<br /> F. H. B. Authors&#039; Society interfering, it was found that<br /> the firm was bankrupt and had vanished without<br /> assets.<br /> III.-LONG RETENTION OF MSS.<br /> I had written two more books by this time;<br /> Perhaps one of the greatest grievances and one a work of 58opp. 4to. on some little-known<br /> discouragements the literary aspirant has to languages, and the other a history in two volumes,<br /> suffer from is the unreasonably long detention of 875pp. 4to. A highly-placed official of the<br /> his MSS. by publishers or editors. In fact, the Government of India saw the MS. of the first<br /> preliminary step to failure or renown resembles book and said, “ You will let us have this”; of<br /> the launching of Moses among the bulrushes, or course, publication by the Government of India<br /> the venturesome vulgar boys of Margate sands is a cachet for a work, so I agreed. The second<br /> who went to sea in a sieve.<br /> book was written at the request of the Govern-<br /> A play of mine was retained by a stage manager ment in my leisure time, but not in any way “by<br /> for over a year, and then he pretended he had lost order.”<br /> it. At length I bearded the lion in his den, I agreed because my experiences with private<br /> and simply seized it on the rack of his desk, and firms of publishers had not been pleasant or<br /> walked off triumphant. Recently an elaborate profitable, and if the Government of India tells<br /> work of 500 pages went the round of four pub- one of its servants that it wishes to publish his<br /> lishers in the short twinkling of fifteen months! books, he knows a great deal better than to<br /> The fifth grand lama delightedly appropriated it refuse.<br /> by return of post, politely offering me £50 in Both books were published by the Government<br /> return for five years&#039; exile and hard labour. of India, and I received 30 copies of the first and<br /> Being but a Grub-street vagabond, I accepted; 42 copies of the second. I have not received any<br /> and then had the pleasure of correcting the proofs payment or other acknowledgment, and the<br /> of the mutilated and largely abridged “copy,&quot; Government have all the rights and the owner-<br /> which, although written in the same legible hand ship of the books.<br /> as enclosure, largely abounded in distinctly Now, have I been well treated or not, and how<br /> “ printer&#039;s errors.” My magnum opus having do the Government compare, as publishers, with<br /> honourably run the gauntlet of the critics, I hope some of those firms our Society has been so busy<br /> fully inquired about the sales by way of curiosity, safeguarding its members against ? TALAI.<br /> but received no answer.<br /> I have lost nearly half of my contributions to<br /> magazines, and enclosure represents the sting of a<br /> V.—THE HARDSHIPS OF THE TYPIST.<br /> recent experience.<br /> Your correspondent&#039;s remarks on the hardships-<br /> J. S. LAURIE. of the typist are just. Ninepence a thousand words<br /> is cruel pay, in face of the fact ihat the work is<br /> IV.—THE INDIAN GOVERNMENT AS PUBLISHERS. very uncertain.<br /> I give my experiences with publishers in the The lady who has typed my later novels (Miss<br /> hope of obtaining some expression of opinion E. Longworth, 310, Strand) assures me that some-<br /> regarding the position adopted by the Indian times for weeks at a stretch she has scarcely any.<br /> Government towards those of its unfortunate thing to do, and then is wearied by a sudden rush<br /> servants who happen to be authors.<br /> of work, much of which she has to put out and<br /> In 1887 I wrote, at the request of the head of pay for, as she cannot do it in the time given her.<br /> the local government under which I was then And authors are always in a hurry!<br /> serving, a small work containing special informil- She charges me is. a thousand words, and gives.<br /> tion which I alone possessed, and brought the a carbon copy in, which is, I think, as fair as<br /> MS. to England. The Secretary of State for anyone can desire. One cannot expect typewriting<br /> India gave me £100 and told me to bave the book to be done well for less, and any typist who makes<br /> published at my own expense ; both he and the a lower charge shows herself an enemy to the other<br /> Government of India promised to take a certain members of her profession.<br /> number of copies.<br /> One thing should be remembered—that the<br /> This was very satisfactory, and I hoped for a working of a typewriter is exhausting to most<br /> reasonable profit. I had returned to the East, a women. It causes a fearful backache in many<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 57 (#83) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 57<br /> cases, and, if persisted in too long every day, is Mr. Beckles Willson, whose history of the<br /> very injurious to health. Considering all this, I Hudson&#039;s Bay Company was published a few<br /> should be ashamed to pay another woman less months ago, is now writing a somewhat similar<br /> than I should care to work for myself. Is it not work on the East India Company.<br /> time that typists combined to protect themselves ?<br /> Mr. Anstey&#039;s new story, to be published in<br /> Ninepence a thousand words will soon sink to<br /> October by Messrs. Smith, Elder, and Co., is<br /> sixpence—and then ? Mary L. PENDERED.<br /> called “ The Brass Bottle.”<br /> be<br /> Mr. Ashton Ellis&#039;s life of Wagner will be in<br /> four volumes, the first of which Messrs. Kegan<br /> BOOK AND PLAY TALK.<br /> Paul hope to publish in the autumn.<br /> Mr. C. T. Hagberg Wright, the librarian of the<br /> MOLONEL SPENCER CHILDERS, of the London Library, is engaged upon a biography of<br /> Royal Engineers, has prepared the “Life Count Tolstoy.<br /> and Correspondence of Mr. Childers,&quot; Mr. Ferrar Fenton has in the press a sixth<br /> which will be published in one volume by Mr.<br /> edition of his “ St. Paul&#039;s Epistles in Modern<br /> Murray. Mr. Childers&#039;s political career lasted<br /> English,” with an “Introduction estimating that<br /> from 1860 to 1892, during which time he occupied<br /> Apostle&#039;s influence upon the Progress of Man.<br /> five Ministerial posts--First Lord, Chancellor of<br /> kind.&quot; The publishers are Messrs. Horace Mar.<br /> the Duchy, Secretary for War, Chancellor of the<br /> shall and Son.<br /> Exchequer, and Home Secretary.<br /> Mr. Aylmer Gowing&#039;s new novel, “A Spider&#039;s<br /> Lord Rosslyn is publishing through Messrs.<br /> Web,” will be the next work produced in Mr.<br /> Blackwood an account of his adventures during<br /> Burleigh&#039;s half-crown series. The plot is evolved<br /> the war in South Africa. The book will be called<br /> through the arts of a fair Russian Arachne, who<br /> “ Twice Captured.”<br /> spins her web about a young English attaché. A<br /> Mr. W. Basil Worsfold is writing “ The Story contrast to the dark shadow of deceit and crime<br /> of Egypt” for Messrs. Horace Marshall and Son&#039;s is found in an idyllic love story in England.<br /> little Story of the Empire Series. “The Story of<br /> A third edition of Mr. de V. Payen-Payne&#039;s<br /> Uganda,&quot; which also will appear this autumn, is by<br /> 1, is by “French Idioms and Proverbs &quot; is shortly to be<br /> Brigadier-General Lugard, C.B., D.S.O.<br /> published by Mr. David Nutt. The first edition<br /> A new history of “The Venetian Republic” has of this work appeared in 1893, and the second in<br /> been written by Mr. W. Carew Hazlitt, and will 1897, and it is now accepted in all colleges and<br /> be published shortly.<br /> schools where French is seriously studied as a<br /> The Publishers&#039; Circular makes the following competent guide to a very difficult subject. For<br /> statement (July 21):-<br /> those preparing for examinations, such as those<br /> As an indication of the success of the net system, the<br /> of the London, Victoria, or Welsh Universities,<br /> Booksellers&#039; Association has sent a letter to the Publishers&#039; the Society of Arts, the Oxford and Cambridge<br /> Association expressing the hope that the number of net locals, or the Civil Service Commissioners, this<br /> books may be increased. The publishers are now giving book is valuable.<br /> the matter their serious attention.<br /> A story of Afghan life by Miss Lillias Hamilton,<br /> The War Fund book, “For Britain&#039;s Soldiers,&quot;<br /> who was the Ameer&#039;s medical adviser, will be wi<br /> or will be which Mr. Cutcliffe Hyne has got together and<br /> published by Mr. Murray, under the title “A<br /> Messrs. Methuen are publishing gratuitously, will<br /> Vizier&#039;s Daughter : an Autobiography.” This<br /> be on sale for three months only, so as to induce<br /> publisher has also on his autumn list a novel by<br /> the charitable to buy copies in the pious hope that<br /> Lady Hely Hutchinson, entitled “Monica Grey,&quot;<br /> they may go to a premium afterwards. The con-<br /> and one by the Hon. Mrs. Walter Forbes, “A<br /> tributors are Messrs. Alden, Besan, Crockett,<br /> Gentleman.”<br /> Hornung, Hyne, Kipling, Mason, Moore, Pem-<br /> berton, Roberts, Ridge, Wells, White, Wood, and<br /> “ Footsteps of a Throne&quot; is the title of Mr.<br /> Mrs. Croker.<br /> Max Pemberton&#039;s new book, which Messrs.<br /> Methuen will publish in this country.<br /> An early new comedy at Wyndham&#039;s Theatre<br /> will be “My Lady Dainty,” by the lady who<br /> A posthumous story by the late Mrs. Lynn wrote “ Young Mr. Jedburg” and “ An American<br /> Linton, entitled “ The Second Life of Theodora<br /> Citizen.” The new piece was produced success-<br /> Desanges,” will appear shortly.<br /> fully at Brighton a month ago. The scene is<br /> Mr. Egerton Castle&#039;s new novel for the autumn laid partly in Devonshire and partly in New<br /> is to be called “ The Sacred Orchard.&quot;<br /> York.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 58 (#84) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 58<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> At the Duke of York&#039;s a new comedy by Mr. Exhibition, and the other (which should be con-<br /> Henry Arthur Jones will be produced by Mr. sulted by all interested in the China crisis) with<br /> Charles Frohman in September.<br /> the most important recent English and French<br /> In view of the success which the German plays works on China ; it appeared in Literature of<br /> have met with in London this year, a syndicate<br /> ndirate<br /> July 21.<br /> July 21.<br /> (with Mr. Henry Oppenheim and the Earl of Mr. Cosmo Hamilton&#039;s new book is called<br /> Dysart among the guarantors) has been formed “Impudent Dialogues,&quot; and will be published by<br /> for the production of German pieces at the Mr. Arrowsmith next spring. The romantic play<br /> Comedy Theatre from the middle of October to in four acts founded on “ The Countess Tekla,&quot;<br /> the middle of April next.<br /> by Mr. Hamilton and Mr. Robert Barr, is to be<br /> The object of the National Drama Company, produced in London next Easter. Mr. Hamilton<br /> which has just been formed, is “to provide an is at present engaged on a society extravaganza<br /> organisation by which our great plays may be to be called “The Danger of Innocence,” which<br /> produced in frequent succession; and it has been will form the Christmas number of the World.<br /> thought advisable,” says the prospectus,“ to The editor of the Century Magazine has taken<br /> make Mr. F. R. Benson&#039;s Shakespearean and Old up the charge against the American stage, and<br /> Comedy company-which has long been engaged goes the length of saying that American drama-<br /> in this work as a private undertaking, and has a tists are not only incapable of appreciating what<br /> repertory of no less than twenty-three of Shake is intellectual, instructive, wholesome, or inspiring,<br /> speare&#039;s plays—the basis of the new organisa but addicted naturally to what is morbid, auda-<br /> tion.” The capital is £27,000 in ordinary and cious, or unclean. On this subject, and in view<br /> preference shares, and the board of directors of the recent discussion in Parliament of the<br /> includes Sir H. W. Lawrence, Sir John Scott, Mr. English stage, it is instructive to observe the<br /> Joseph Walton, Q.C., and Mr. Benson.<br /> point of view of another American, Judge<br /> Mr. Stephen Phillips has written for Mr. Beer- Fursman, as expressed in his summing-up in the<br /> bohm Tree a new play on the subject of Herod prosecution against the performance of “ Sapho&quot;<br /> the Great. It will be called “The King of the in New York-a case which ended, as will be<br /> Jews,&quot; and will be presented at Her Majesty&#039;s remembered, in the acquittal of Miss Olga<br /> during the coming season. Mr. Tree intends also Nethersole and her colleagues. Addressing the<br /> to produce two Shakespearean plays—“ Julius jury on their duties, the judge said:<br /> Cæsar” and “ Othello.&quot; For the former he has Consider as to them only the fair arguments that in the<br /> secured Mr. Murray Carson for the part of Julius cold deliberation of honest minds ought to prevail. Where<br /> Cæsar, Mr. Beveridge as Casca, and Mr. Robert<br /> you sit there is no room for imagination. Where you sit<br /> there is no room for sympathy, for prejudice, or for<br /> Taber for the role of Cassius.<br /> vengeance. You are not here in the interests of any public<br /> Mr. Martin Harvey has taken the Lyceum newspaper. You are not here in the interests of the public<br /> Theatre for the autumn, and his programme will<br /> prosecution. You are not here in the interests of the<br /> defendants. You are here as sworn officers of the law to<br /> probably include, first, “ Romeo and Juliet,&quot; and determine what the truth is—what justice requires, what<br /> afterwards an adaptation by Mr. Charles Hannan fairness demands, under the evidence and the law in this<br /> of Mr. Marion Crawford&#039;s story, “A Cigarette case. The law requires you to presume that these defen.<br /> Maker&#039;s Romance.&quot;<br /> dants are innocent. Innocence is the garb with which the<br /> law clothes every accused person, and the prosecution is<br /> The familiar type of melodrama at the Adelphi required in law to overcome this presumption by evidence<br /> is at last to suffer an eclipse, Mr. George that leaves no reasonable doubt in a man&#039;s mind. ...<br /> Edwardes having secured the house as a home<br /> The statute does not make it an offence that the tenor,<br /> for the production of musical plays.<br /> the product, the outcome of a book or a play is not moral.<br /> The statute makes it an offence when it offends public<br /> On August 30 Miss Julia Neilson will re-open decency so as to become a public nuisance. Mere sag-<br /> the Haymarket Theatre with the new play by Mr.<br /> gestiveness—and I think it must be said in all fairness<br /> Paul Kester entitled &quot;Sweet N L of &#039;Durga that there are things in this play, and it cannot be denied<br /> and has not been denied, that are to a certain extent sag.<br /> -otherwise Nell Gwyn. The play is in four<br /> gestive—but mere suggestiveness is not sufficient. It is<br /> acts, and besides Miss Neilson the cast includes<br /> not enough, in order to make a crime under this statute,<br /> Mr. Fred Terry, Mr. W. Mollison, Mr. Sydney that it may offend the modesty of young girls. This statute<br /> Brough, and Miss Constance Collier.<br /> means, when it declares a play to be an offence against<br /> public decency, that it shall be of such a character as to<br /> Two bibliographical articles of considerable offend in that manner the great mass of the people of all<br /> interest at the present juncture appeared in characters, of all estates, of all faiths, of all denominations,<br /> the course of July in Literature from the of all positions in society.<br /> pen of E. A. Reynolds-Ball. One (July 7) The only book ever done by President Lincoln<br /> dealt with the recent literature of the Paris is about to be published in America by Messrs.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 59 (#85) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 59<br /> BOOKS AND REVIEWS.<br /> (In these columns notes on books are given from reviews<br /> which carry weight, and are not, so far as can be learned,<br /> logrollers.)<br /> McClure, Phillips, and Co., and will be a repro.<br /> duction in exact facsimile of a small scrap-<br /> hook compiled by Lincoln for use in the political<br /> campaign of 1858. This book was presented by<br /> the owner to his strongest supporter, Captain<br /> James N. Brown, who carried it with him in 1860<br /> and in subsequent campaigns for use as a book of<br /> reference whenever Lincoln&#039;s opinions were called<br /> in question. Captain Brown died in 1868, and<br /> the book passed to his sons, by whose desire it is<br /> now being published. The clippings give. in<br /> Lincoln&#039;s own words, “the substance of all I have<br /> ever said about negro equality,&quot; and the book also<br /> contains notes in Lincoln&#039;s handwriting prefaced<br /> to the extracts from his speeches. It will be<br /> called “Abraham Lincoln : His Book.”<br /> Mr. Norman Hapgood is following his recent<br /> biography of Lincoln with a life of Washington.<br /> The source of the title, “Red Pottage,&quot; has<br /> been engaging the curiosity of American readers<br /> and reviewers. Some attributed the passage<br /> quoted by the author—&quot; After the red pottage<br /> comes the exceeding bitter cry”—to the Bible,<br /> others thought it came from Omar Khayyam.<br /> At length, Messrs. Harper and Brothers, the<br /> American publishers of the book, sought to place<br /> the matter beyond doubt by asking Miss Chol.<br /> mondeley. Her reply was as follows:-<br /> Miss Cholmondeley, in answer to Messrs. Harpers&#039; inquiry<br /> of May 23, regrets to say she does not know where the<br /> motto comes from—“After the red pottage,” &amp;c. She<br /> remembers jotting it down in her note-book years ago, but<br /> when she turned to it she found to her surprise she had not<br /> added the author&#039;s name, which in nearly every other case<br /> she had been careful to do. She thinks it may be found in<br /> the sermons of the Rev. John Hamilton Thom.<br /> The curiosity of the American reading public<br /> in regard to another lady novelist, Miss Ellen<br /> Thorneycroft Fowler, has been answered in a<br /> singular fashion. Messrs. D. Appleton and Co.<br /> have issued a new edition of “ Concerning Isabel<br /> Carnaby,&quot; which presents a portrait and an<br /> elaborate biographical and critical study of the<br /> author.<br /> The late Mr. Harold Frederic&#039;s work, “The<br /> Damnation of Theron Ware,” which is known in<br /> England as “ Illumination,” is being dramatised<br /> in the United States.<br /> Mr. Walter H. Page, formerly editor of the<br /> Atlantic Monthly, is named as editor of a new<br /> illustrated magazine which Messrs. Doubleday,<br /> Page, and Co. hope to bring out in the autumn.<br /> It will be called “The World&#039;s Work,&quot; and will<br /> attempt to cover a field of its own.<br /> THE “OVERLAND&quot; TO CHINA, by Archibald R. Colqu.<br /> houn (Harper, 168.), “ covers a vast area, for its backbone,<br /> so to speak, is a journey of 7000 miles to and through the<br /> Far East.&quot; Much of it is immediately concerned with the<br /> vital issue and localities of the present crisis, and the Daily<br /> Chronicle trusts it &quot; will be very widely read. It is full of<br /> exact information set forth in most readable fashion, and it<br /> appears at a moment sensationally opportune.&quot; &quot;The<br /> account of diplomatic life in Peking as it used to be is the<br /> best extant.&quot;<br /> CHINA, THE LONG-LIVED EMPIRE, by Eliza R. Scada-<br /> more (Macmillan, 8s. 6d. net), is “to be recommended,”<br /> says the Daily News, &quot;as a lively and vivid account of<br /> Chinese life and character. With its sketches of scenes<br /> and persons where with the entire world is now concerned,<br /> it appears at an opportune moment. It contains a large<br /> namber of good illustrations.&quot;<br /> THE SOUTH AFRICAN CONSPIRACY; or, The Aims of<br /> Afrikanderdom, by Fred W. Bell (Heinemann, 58. net), deals<br /> with “a matter of great importance,&quot; says the Times, and<br /> &quot;serves a useful purpose in bringing the known facts and<br /> the argument to be deduced from them within the reach of<br /> all who seek to be informed.”<br /> My DIOCESE DURING THE WAR, Extracts from the Diary<br /> of the Right Rev. Arthur Hamilton Baynes, D.D., Bishop of<br /> Natal (Bell, 68.), is described by the Daily Chronicle as<br /> “in large measure a chronicle of small things, of personal<br /> detail and hearsay in the rear of the fighting line, of<br /> hamanitarian and yet sensible views of the war and its<br /> consequences.” The author was at the front, says the<br /> Spectator, “and saw many things from a point of view<br /> somewhat different from that either of the soldier or of the<br /> war correspondent, and what he writes is in the best taste,<br /> simple, anaffected, and graphic, withont the least attempt<br /> at fine writing.”<br /> A HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY, by Harald<br /> Höffding (Macmillan, 308.), is a translation from the German<br /> of a work wbich, says the Guardian, “undoubtedly stands in<br /> the front rank of histories of philosophy, not only on account<br /> of the eminence and learning of its author, bat even more<br /> from the lucidity of its plan and the consistency with which<br /> it is adhered to throughout. A history of philosophy should,<br /> the author tells us, throw light on what philosophy really<br /> is ; and the present book not only does this by distin.<br /> guishing the chief problems of the philosopher and tracing<br /> their rise and development, but also by making clear every-<br /> where the intimate relation of philosophy to political and<br /> social conditions and to scientific progress. Parts of the<br /> work are, indeed, almost as much a history of calture as of<br /> philosophy.” The Guardian adds, however, that the trans-<br /> lation needs a “very thorough revision.” Professor<br /> Höffding&#039;s work, says the Daily Chronicle, “is charac-<br /> terised by singular clearness, discrimination, and detach.<br /> ment of mind.”<br /> ROBERT BROWNING, by A. Waagh (Kegan Paul, 28. 6d.<br /> net), is a volume of the “ Westminster Biographies,&quot; &quot; and<br /> is in every way an excellent piece of work,” says the<br /> Spectator. “The two personalities of Robert Browning and<br /> his wife are sympatbetically treated, and there is some<br /> admirable criticism of their literary work.” “It is,&quot; says<br /> the Daily Telegraph “at once a biography, concise, but<br /> omitting nothing material, and a scholarly critical apprecia-<br /> tion.” “Mr. Waugh&#039;s criticism,” says the Daily Chronicle,<br /> “ is justly appreciative, not fanatically eulogistic.&quot;<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 60 (#86) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 60<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> NATURE IN DOWNLAND, by W. H. Hudson (Longmans,<br /> 108. 6d. net), is, among other things, full, says the Daily<br /> Chronicle, “ of amusing evidences of the rural intelligence<br /> as found in the county of Sussex.” “It is long since Mr.<br /> Hudson gave as a book. It is longer still since he gave us<br /> Bo good a book as this one, in which there are more than a<br /> few passages that recall the Naturalist in La Plata &#039;at<br /> his happiest.” The “Downland,” says the Daily News, is<br /> Spectator, the promise is redeemed “ with a measure of<br /> success rare in sequels. Though less prodigal of incident<br /> and description, the present volume is far superior to its<br /> predecessor in concentration and intensity. . . . At the<br /> close of “The School for Saints&#039; it may be remembered<br /> that Robert Orange, the brilliant and many-sided idealist,<br /> had become engaged to the beautiful Mrs. Partieto. . . .<br /> The volume before as unfolds the tragic consequences of<br /> Sussex Downs. “Mr. Hudson shows us every detail of<br /> the landscape,” the features of the treeless downs, the<br /> abundant flowers, bird and beast, reptile and insect, “even<br /> the seldom-noticed snail, apon whose sculptured covering<br /> nature has indeed bestowed some of her very daintiest handi.<br /> work.&quot;<br /> BURMA, by Max and Bertha Ferrara (Low, 308.), describes<br /> “the modern Burmese as he lives and has his being from<br /> the cradle to the grave, with,&quot; says the Daily Telegraph,<br /> “ a painstaking elaborateness and exactitude.” The Daily<br /> Chronicle says the book contains &quot;genuine masses of infor.<br /> mation,&quot; and a “beautiful and varied collection of photo<br /> graphs.” “Everyone,” says Literature, “who is so fortu.<br /> nate as to have read Mr. Fieiding&#039;s book, &#039;The Soul of a<br /> People,&#039; should get ‘Burma. Although, from its size,<br /> weight, and price, it comes into the category of &#039;gift-books,&#039;<br /> books which serve to decorate a table and never get read,<br /> * Burma&#039; should prove the exception to this rule. Our<br /> authors&#039; detailed account of the outward life of the Burmese<br /> -an account which rounds off and completes Mr. Fielding&#039;s<br /> story of their life-is well worth reading.&quot;<br /> A SON OF THE STATE, by W. Pett Ridge (Methaen,<br /> 38. 60.), &quot; is vivid as well as engrossing,” says the Daily<br /> News, &quot;and its robust manliness— quality that asserts<br /> itself on every page—is not certainly its least merit. And,<br /> apart from all other considerations, we can only advise those<br /> who are discontented with existing State institutions to read<br /> Mr. Pett Ridge&#039;s book and benefit by his cheerful optimiam.”<br /> He depicts for us, says the Daily Chronicle,&quot; the blatant,<br /> garish, open-air life of the City-road.” “All the early part<br /> of Mr. Bobbie&#039;s vagrant career is exceedingly gay, lively,<br /> and well told,” and “the book may be recommended to<br /> everyone as a pleasant summer drink.”<br /> LITTLE ANNA MARK, by S. R. Crockett (Smith, Elder<br /> and Co., 68.), is &quot; a rattling rousing story of adventure and<br /> misadventure,&quot; says the Daily Telegraph, &quot;related in the<br /> first person by a somewhat dull-witted Scottish youth.”<br /> The Daily News describes the hero of the book as “a<br /> picturesque villain whose crimes are of the medieval and<br /> semi-Satanic kind,” while&quot; the good angel of the work is a<br /> big Englishman with the euphonious name of Umpbray<br /> Spurway.” The scene is laid partly in Scotland, partly on<br /> a pirate ship, and partly in mysterious tropical islands. The<br /> Chronicle confesses that “Little Anna Mark ” is “very<br /> much to our liking.” “Mr. Crockett carries us along from<br /> exciting incident to thrilling episode, and gives as scarce<br /> time to breathe.&quot;<br /> THE LADYSMITH TREASURY, edited by J. Eveleigh Nash<br /> (Sands, 68.), “has nothing to do with Ladysmith or the<br /> war,” remarks the Spectator, “ except that the profits of the<br /> book are to go to the relief of distress in the town. It con-<br /> tuids sixteen short stories and ketebes. Among the<br /> authors we see the names of Ian Maclaren, W. E. Norris,<br /> Morley Roberts, and F. Frankfort Moore. We recommend<br /> the book to ou readers, and can do so without scruple, not<br /> only because the object is patriotic, but because there is<br /> good literary work in it.”<br /> ROBERT ORANGE, by John Oliver Hobbes (Unwin, 68.),<br /> which the Daily Telegraph describes as a containing work<br /> “uniformly sober, restrained, literary,&quot; is the promised con-<br /> tinuation of “The School for Saints,&quot; and, says the<br /> adds: “It is rare in these democratic days to encounter &amp;<br /> book in which the existence of the masses is barely hinted<br /> at; it is not unwelcome, after the tyranny of slum realism,<br /> to be for once in a way completely relieved from the con.<br /> templation of squalid emotions and underbred unhappiness.”<br /> AFRICAN NIGHTS&#039; ENTERTAINMENTS, by A. J. Dawson<br /> (Heinemann, 68.), contains a dozen studies of Morocco<br /> which the Spectator says are “ very picturesque.” “The<br /> • West Coast&#039; stories in the book are also striking,&quot; &quot; and<br /> Mr. Dawson has seized the essential difference between<br /> Morocco and what we may call the East&#039; with acute<br /> appreciation.” Mr. Dawson&#039;s book, says the Daily Chronicle,<br /> “does not hold a dull page, and the unmistakable earnest-<br /> ness aboat certain of the more dramatic stories robs them<br /> of any offence.”<br /> THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A CHARWOMAN, as chronicled<br /> by Annie Wakeman (Macqueen, 6s.), “ if it really gives a trne<br /> account of its heroine&#039;s adventures,&quot; “ may be taken,&quot; says<br /> the Spectator, &quot; as a striking example of the fact that happi-<br /> ness does not lie in outward circumstances.” “Through the<br /> various vicissitudes of her career Betty shows no sort of<br /> feeling of her life being intolerable, but bears her troubles<br /> as she does her babies, with a fine sense of the uselessness<br /> of a struggle against the inevitable. The cheerful patience<br /> of the poor is cleverly indicated, and readers who like this<br /> stamp of story will enjoy Miss Annie Wakeman&#039;s book.&quot;<br /> Miss Wakeman&#039;s charwoman, says the Daily Chronicle, &quot; is<br /> magnificently real and altogether admirable.”<br /> STUDIES IN LOVE, by Maud Egerton King (Dent, 43. 60.<br /> net), consists of four stories, which in the opinion of the<br /> Daily News are &quot; very charming,” After saying that the<br /> book is “very pretty reading,” the Spectator adds that it is<br /> “ one which irresistibly suggests a hammock and a hot mid.<br /> summer afternoon as the proper place and time for its<br /> perasal.”<br /> A MILLIONAIRE OF YESTERDAY, by E. Phillips Oppen.<br /> heim (Ward, Lock and Co., 68.) is said by the Daily<br /> News to be quite up to his usual level.&quot; &quot;The story is<br /> romantic, and the African scenes are very vivid and<br /> picturesque.” Mr. Oppenheim takes for the theme of his<br /> novel the always engrossing topic of the quest and attain-<br /> ment of boundless wealth. Scarlett Trent, the hero, is an<br /> ex-Board-school boy who bas drifted to West Africa, and<br /> in partnership with a broken down and bibulous aristo-<br /> crat secured a valuable mining concession on the Congo.<br /> AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORICAL HANDBOOK TO THE<br /> PARISH OF CHELSEA, by Reginald Blunt (Lawley, 28. 6d.<br /> net.), is described by the Spectator as “an attractive hand-<br /> book,&quot; and by the Daily News as “an admirable little<br /> volume.”<br /> MEMORIES OF SOME OXFORD Pets, collected by Mrs.<br /> Wallace (B. H. Blackwell, Oxford, 38.), “is a delightful<br /> book,&quot; says the Spectator, “fittingly commended to tbe<br /> reader by Mr. Warde Fowler&#039;s admirable preface. Dogs, of<br /> course, occupy, so to speak, the front benches. It needs no<br /> Lex Roscia to secure that for them. Then come three cats,<br /> a brown owl, a chameleon, a jerboa, a mouse, a hen, and the<br /> rat-a Japanese rat, it must be understood. These creatures,<br /> some of whose histories are written for them and some<br /> written by themselves, furnish us with a feast of good<br /> things.&quot;<br /> :<br /> -<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 60 (#87) ##############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> T Y P E W RI TING<br /> (Authors&#039; MSS.)<br /> Undertaken by highly educated women of Literary experience (Classical Tripos ; Higher Cambridge<br /> Local; thorough acquaintance with modern languages). 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334https://historysoa.com/items/show/334The Author, Vol. 11 Issue 04 (September 1900)<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=49&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=%3Cem%3EThe+Author%3C%2Fem%3E%2C+Vol.+11+Issue+04+%28September+1900%29"><em>The Author</em>, Vol. 11 Issue 04 (September 1900)</a><a href="https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390" target="_blank" rel="noopener">https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=51&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=Publication">Publication</a>1900-09-01-The-Author-11-4<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=76&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=1900-09-01">1900-09-01</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=89&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=11">11</a>461–8019000901The Author.<br /> (The Organ of the Incorporated Society of Authors. Monthly.)<br /> CONDUCTED BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> VOL. XI.—No. 4.]<br /> SEPTEMBER 1, 1900.<br /> [PRICE SIXPENCE.<br /> -<br /> CONTENTS.<br /> PAGE<br /> 61<br /> :<br /> :<br /> ... 62<br /> ... 64<br /> Memoranda ...<br /> Literary Property-<br /> 1. On Titles<br /> 2. Copyright in Speeches<br /> 3. Merivale v. Harvey ...<br /> Paris Letter. By Darracotte Scott<br /> American Letter. By John Russell Davidson<br /> Notes and News. By the Editor...<br /> PAGE<br /> Another Benefactor ..<br /> 72<br /> The Ideal Editor .<br /> American Publishers&#039; Association ...<br /> Reflections ...<br /> Correspondance --1. Good and Bad English. 2. Walter » Lene.<br /> 3. English Authors in the United States ...<br /> Book and Play Talk...<br /> Books and Reviews ...<br /> ... ... 79<br /> PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOCIETY.<br /> The Annual Report. That for the past year can be had on application to the Secretary.<br /> The Author. A Monthly Journal devoted especially to the protection and maintenance of Literary<br /> Property. Issued to all Members, 6s. 6d. per annum. Back numbers are offered at the<br /> following prices : Vol. I., 108. 6d. (Bound); Vols. II., III., and IV., 88. 6d. each (Bound);<br /> Vols. V. to VIII. (Unbound), 6s. 6d.<br /> 3. Literature and the Pension List. By W. MORRIS COLLES, Barrister-at-Law. Henry Glaisher,<br /> 95, Strand, W.C. 35.<br /> 4. The History of the Société des Gens de Lettres. By S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE, late Secretary to<br /> the Society. IS.<br /> 6. The Cost of Production. In this work specimens are given of the most important forms of type,<br /> size of page, &amp;c., with estimates showing what it costs to produce the more common kinds of<br /> books. Henry Glaisher, 95, Strand, W.C. 28, 6d. (Out of print at present.)<br /> 6. The Various Methods of Publication. By S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE. In this work, compiled from the<br /> papers in the Society&#039;s offices, the various forms of agreements proposed by Publishers to<br /> Authors are examined, and their meaning carefully explained, with an account of the various<br /> kinds of fraud which have been made possible by the different clauses in their agreements.<br /> Henry Glaisher, 95, Strand, W.C. 38.<br /> 7. Copyright Law Reform. An Exposition of Lord Monkswell&#039;s Copyright Bill of 1890. With<br /> Extracts from the Report of the Commission of 1878, and an Appendix containing the<br /> Berne Convention and the American Copyright Bill. By J. M. LELY. Eyre and Spottis-<br /> woode. 1s. 6d.<br /> 8. The Society of Authors. A Record of its Action from its Foundation. By Walter BESANT<br /> (Chairman of Committee, 1888–1892). 15.<br /> 9. The Contract of Publication in Germany, Austria, Hungary, and Switzerland. By Ernst<br /> LUNGE, J.U.D. 28. 6d.<br /> 10. The Addenda to the &quot;Methods of Publishing.&quot; By G. HERBERT THring. Being additional<br /> facts collected at the office of the Society since the publication of the “Methods.&quot; With<br /> comments and advice. 28.<br /> 11. Forms of Agreement issued by the Publishers&#039; Association ; with Comments. By G. HERBERT<br /> THRING, and Illustrative Examples by Sir WALTER BESANT. 1S.<br /> The Empire Translation Bureau,<br /> 25, PRINCE&#039;S STREET, HANOVER SQUARE, W.<br /> All kinds of LITERARY WORK undertaken by Gentlemen of the highest University education.<br /> AUTHORS&#039; MSS. TYPEWRITTEN (Williams Machine).<br /> Rates vary according to the intrinsic difficulties of the MSS. submitted. Write for prospectus.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 60 (#90) ##############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> The Society of Authors (Incorporated).<br /> PRESIDENT.<br /> GEORGE MEREDITH.<br /> COUNCIL.<br /> SIR EDWIN ARNOLD, K.C.I.E., C.S.I. AUSTIN Dobson.<br /> SIR LEWIS MORRIS.<br /> J. M. BARRIE.<br /> A. CONAN DOYLE, M.D.<br /> HENRY NORMAN.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> A. W. DUBOURG.<br /> Miss E. A. ORMEROD.<br /> ROBERT BATEMAN.<br /> SIR MICHAEL FOSTER, K.C.B., F.R.S. GILBERT PARKER.<br /> F. E. BEDDARD, F.R.S.<br /> D. W. FRESHFIELD.<br /> J. C. PARKINSON.<br /> SIR HENRY BERGNE, K.C.M.G. RICHARD GARNETT, C.B., LL.D.<br /> A. W. PINERO.<br /> SIR WALTER BEBANT.<br /> EDMUND GOSSE.<br /> THE RIGHT HON. THE LORD PIR-<br /> AUGUSTINE BIRRELL, M.P.<br /> H. RIDER HAGGARD.<br /> BRIGHT, F.R.S.<br /> THE REV. PROF. BONNEY, F.R.S. THOMAS HARDY.<br /> SIR FREDERICK POLLOCK, Bart., LL.D.<br /> THE RIGHT Hon. JAMES BRYCE, M.P. ANTHONY HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> WALTER HERRIES POLLOCK.<br /> THE RIGHT HON. THE LORD BURGH. JEROME K. JEROME.<br /> E. ROSE.<br /> CLERE.<br /> J. Scott KELTIE, LL.D.<br /> W. BAPTISTE SCOONES.<br /> HALL CAINE.<br /> RUDYARD KIPLING.<br /> Miss FLORA L. SHAW.<br /> EGERTON CASTLE, F.S.A.<br /> PROF. E. RAY LANKESTER, F.R.S. G. R. SIMs.<br /> P. W. CLAYDEN.<br /> THE RIGHT HON. W. E. H. LECKY S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE.<br /> EDWARD CLODD.<br /> M.P.<br /> J. J. STEVENSON.<br /> W. MORRIS COLLES.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> FRANCIS STORR.<br /> THE HON. JOHN COLLIER.<br /> THE REV. W. J. LOFTIE, F.S.A.<br /> WILLIAM Moy THOMAS.<br /> SIR W. MARTIN CONWAY.<br /> Sir A. C. MACKENZIE, Mas.Doc. MRS. HUMPHRY WARD.<br /> F. MARION CRAWFORD.<br /> PROF. J. M. D. MEIKLEJOHN.<br /> Miss CHARLOTTE M. YONGB.<br /> THE Right Hon. THE LORD CURZON THE REV. C. H. MIDDLETON-WAKE.<br /> OF KEDLESTON.<br /> Hon. Counsel - E. M. UNDERDOWN, Q.C.<br /> COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT.<br /> Chairman-A, HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> A. W. A BECKETT.<br /> J. SCOTT KELTIE, LL.D.<br /> GILBERT PARKER.<br /> SIR WALTER BESANT.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> E. ROSE.<br /> EGERTON CASTLE, F.S.A.<br /> HENRY NORMAN.<br /> FRANCIS STORR.<br /> D. W. FRESHFIELD.<br /> &#039;SUB-COMMITTEES.<br /> ART.<br /> Hon. JOHN COLLIER (Chairman). I SIR W. MARTIN CONWAY.<br /> M. H. SPIELMANN<br /> COPYRIGHT.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> A. HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> W. M. COLLES.<br /> GILBERT PARKER.<br /> DRAMA.<br /> HENRY ARTHUR JONES (Chairman).<br /> F. C. BURNAND.<br /> A. W. PINERO.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> : SYDNEY GRUNDY.<br /> EDWARD ROSE.<br /> Solicitors,<br /> FIELD, Roscoe, and Co., Lincoln&#039;s Inn Fields.<br /> C G. HERBERT THRING, 4, Portugal-street.<br /> Secretary-G. HERBERT THRING.<br /> OFFICES : 4, PORTUGAL STREET, LINCOLN&#039;S INN FIELDS, W.C.<br /> A. P. WATT &amp; SON,<br /> LITERARY AGENTS,<br /> Formerly of 2, PATERNOSTER SQUARE,<br /> Have now removed to<br /> HASTINGS HOUSE, NORFOLK STREET, STRAND,<br /> LONDON, W.C.<br /> THE KNIGHTS and KINGS of CHESS. By the Rev.<br /> GA. MACDONNELL, B.A. Price 28. 6d. net.<br /> London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.O.<br /> THE ART of CHESS. By JAMES MASON. Price 58.<br /> net, by post 58. 4d<br /> London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Broam&#039;s-buildings, E.C.<br /> |<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 61 (#91) ##############################################<br /> <br /> The El u tbor.<br /> (The Organ of the Incorporated Society of Authors. Monthly.)<br /> CONDUCTED BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> Vol. XI.-No. 4.]<br /> SEPTEMBER 1, 1900.<br /> [PRICE SIXPENCE.<br /> For the Opinions expressed in papers that are<br /> signed or initialled the Authors alone are<br /> responsible. None of the papers or para-<br /> graphs must be taken as expressing the<br /> collective opinions of the Committee unless<br /> they are officially signed by G. Herbert<br /> Thring, Sec.<br /> M HE Secretary of the Society begs to give notice that all<br /> 1 remittances are acknowledged by return of post, and<br /> requests that all members not receiving an answer to<br /> important communications within two days will write to him<br /> without delay. All remittances should be crossed Union<br /> Bank of London, Chancery-lane, or be sent by registered<br /> letter only.<br /> (6.) Not to bind yourself for future work to any publisher.<br /> As well bind yourself for the future to any one solicitor or<br /> doctor!<br /> III. THE ROYALTY SYSTEM.<br /> It is above all things necessary to know what the<br /> proposed royalty means to both sides. It is now possible<br /> for an author to ascertain approximately and very nearly<br /> the truth. From time to time the very important figures<br /> connected with royalties are published in The Author.<br /> Readers can also work out the figures themselves from the<br /> “ Cost of Production.&quot;<br /> IV. A COMMISSION AGREEMENT.<br /> The main points are :-<br /> (1.) Be careful to obtain a fair cost of production.<br /> (2.) Keep control of the advertisements.<br /> (3.) Keep control of the sale price of the book.<br /> GENERAL<br /> All other forms of agreement are combinations of the four<br /> above mentioned<br /> Such combinations are generally disastrous to the author.<br /> Never sign any agreement without competent advice from<br /> the Secretary of the Society.<br /> Stamp all agreements with the Inland Revenue stamp.<br /> Avoid agreements by letter if possible.<br /> The main points which the Society has always demanded<br /> from the outset are :-<br /> (1.) That both sides shall know what an agreement<br /> means.<br /> (2.) The inspection of those account books which belong<br /> to the author. We are advised that this is a right, in the<br /> nature of a common law right, which cannot be denied or<br /> withheld.<br /> Communications and letters are invited by the Editor on<br /> all subjects connected with literature, but on no other sub-<br /> jocts whatever. Articles which cannot be accepted are<br /> returned if stamps for the purpose accompany the MSS.<br /> GENERAL MEMORANDA.<br /> WARNINGS TO DRAMATIC AUTHORS.<br /> TERE are a few standing rules to be observed in an<br /> agreement. There are four methods of dealing<br /> with literary property :-<br /> I. THAT OF SELLING IT OUTRIGHT.<br /> This is in some respects the most satisfactory, if a proper<br /> price can be obtained. But the transaction should be<br /> managed by a competent agent, or with the advice of the<br /> Secretary of the Society.<br /> II. A PROFIT-SHARING AGREEMENT (a bad form of<br /> agreement).<br /> In this case the following rules should be attended to:<br /> (1.) Not to sign any agreement in which the cost of pro-<br /> duction forms a part without the strictest investigation.<br /> (2.) Not to give the publisher the power of putting the<br /> profits into his own pocket by charging for advertisements<br /> in his own organs: or by charging exchange advertise.<br /> ments. Therefore keep control of the advertisements.<br /> (3.) Not to allow a special charge for &quot; office expenses,&quot;<br /> unless the same allowance is made to the author.<br /> (4.) Not to give up American, Colonial, or Continental<br /> rights.<br /> (5.) Not to give up serial or translation rights.<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> 1. N EVER sign an agreement without submitting it to<br /> the Secretary of the Society of Authors or some<br /> competent legal authority.<br /> 2. It is well to be extremely careful in negotiating for<br /> the production of a play with anyone except an established<br /> manager.<br /> 3. There are three forms of dramatic contract for PLAYS<br /> IN THREE OR MORE ACTS :-<br /> (a.) SALE OUTRIGHT OF THE PERFORMING RIGHT.<br /> This is unsatisfactory. An author who enters<br /> into such a contract should stipulate in the con-<br /> tract for production of the piece by a certain date<br /> and for proper publication of his name on the<br /> play-bills.<br /> I 2<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 62 (#92) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 62<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> (6.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE Secretary will always be glad to have any agreements, new<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF PERCENTAGES or old, for inspection and note. The information thus<br /> on gross receipts. Percentages vary between obtained may prove invaluable.<br /> 5 and 15 per cent. An author should obtain a 4. Before signing any agreement whatever, send the pro-<br /> porcentage on the sliding scale of gross receipts posed document to the Society for examination.<br /> in preference to the American system. Shoald 5. Remember always that in belonging to the Society you<br /> obtain a sum in advance of percentages. A fixed are fighting the battlos of other writers, even if you are<br /> date on or before which the play should be reaping no benefit to yourself, and that you are advancing<br /> performed.<br /> the best interests of literature in promoting the indepen.<br /> (c.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE dence of the writer.<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF ROYALTIES (i.e., 6. The Committee have now arranged for the reception of<br /> fixed nightly fees). This method should be members&#039; agreements and their preservation in a fireproof<br /> always avoided except in cases where the fees safe. The agreements will, of course, be regarded as con-<br /> are likely to be small or difficult to collect. The fidential documents to be read only by the Secretary, who<br /> other safeguards set out ander heading (b.) apply will keep the key of the safe. The Society now offers :-(1)<br /> also in this case.<br /> To read and advise upon agreements and publishers. (2) To<br /> 4. PLAYS IN ONE ACT are often sold outright, but it is stamp agreements in readiness for a possible action upon<br /> better to obtain a small nightly fee if possible, and a sum them. (3) To keep agreements. (4) To enforce payments<br /> paid in advance of such fees in any event. It is extremely due according to agreements.<br /> important that the amateur rights of one act plays should<br /> be reserved<br /> 5. Authors should remember that performing rights can<br /> be limited, and are usually limited by town, country, and<br /> THE READING BRANCH.<br /> time. This is most important.<br /> 6. Authors should not assign performing rights, but M EMBERS will greatly assist the Society in this<br /> should grant a licence to perform. The legal distinction isM branch of their work by informing young writers of<br /> of great importance.<br /> its existence. Their MSS. can be read and treated<br /> 7. Authors should remember that performing rights in a as a composition is treated by a coach. The term MSS.<br /> play are distinct from literary copyright. A manager includes not only works of fiction but poetry and dramatic<br /> holding the performing right or licence to perform cannot works, and when it is possible, under special arrangement,<br /> print the book of the words.<br /> technical and scientific works. The Readers are writers of<br /> 8. Never forget that American rights may be exceedingly competence and experience. The fee is one guinea.<br /> valuable. They should never be included in English<br /> agreements without the author obtaining a substantial<br /> consideration.<br /> 9. Agreements for collaboration should be carefully<br /> NOTICES.<br /> drawn and executed before collaboration is commenced.<br /> 10. An author should remember that production of a play<br /> is highly speculative : that he runs a very great risk of<br /> M HE Editor of The Author begs to remind members of the<br /> delay and a breakdown in the fulfilment of his contract.<br /> I Society that, although the paper is sent to them free<br /> He should therefore guard himself all the more carefully in<br /> of charge, the cost of producing it would be a very<br /> the beginning.<br /> heavy charge on the resources of the Society if a great<br /> 11. An author must remember that the dramatic market<br /> many members did not forward to the Secretary the modest<br /> is exceedingly limited, and that for a novice the first object<br /> 68. 6d. subscription for the year.<br /> is to obtain adequate publication.<br /> Communications for The Author should be addressed to<br /> As these warnings must necessarily be incomplete on<br /> the Offices of the Society, 4, Portugal-street, Lincoln&#039;s-inn<br /> account of the wide range of the subject of dramatic con.<br /> Fields, W.C., and should reach the Editor not later than the<br /> tracts, those authors desirous of further information are<br /> 21st of each month.<br /> referred to the Secretary of the Society.<br /> All persons engaged in literary work of any kind, whether<br /> members of the Society or not, are invited to communicate<br /> to the Editor any points connected with their work whicb<br /> it would be advisable in the general interest to publish.<br /> The present location of the Authors&#039; Club is at 3, White.<br /> HOW TO USE THE SOCIETY.<br /> hall-court, Charing Cross. Address the Secretary for<br /> information, rules of admission, &amp;c.<br /> T VERY member has a right to ask for and to receive<br /> advice upon his agreements, his choice of a pub.<br /> lisher, or any dispute arising in the conduct of his<br /> business or the administration of his property. If the<br /> LITERARY PROPERTY.<br /> advice sought is such as can be given best by a solici.<br /> tor, the member has &amp; right to an opinion from the<br /> 1.-ON TITLES.<br /> Society&#039;s solicitors. If the case is such that Counsel&#039;s<br /> opinion is desirable, the Committee will obtain for him<br /> WING to the fact that during the past two<br /> Counsel&#039;s opinion. All this without any cost to the member.<br /> or three months certain cases have been<br /> 2. Remember that questions connected with copyright<br /> placed before the Secretary of the Society<br /> and publisher&#039;s agreoments do not generally fall within the of Authors touching the infringement of property<br /> experience of ordinary solicitors. Therefore, do not scruple in titles of hooice it he<br /> in titles of books, it has been thought well to<br /> to use the Society<br /> 2. Send to the Office copies of past agreements and past repeat in substance, with certain additions, an<br /> accounts with the loan of the books represented. The article that appeared in The Author in 1898.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 63 (#93) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 63<br /> • The first statement it is necessary to make is of the plaintiffs, which product was a well-known<br /> that, speaking generally, there is no copyright in marketable commodity.<br /> titles. This statement, however, cannot be taken In order to obtain this property, one or two<br /> as absolutely true, as in the case of “ Dick v. points therefore are clear :<br /> Yates,&quot; which went to the Court of Appeal, where (1) That the product must be actually selling<br /> the title“ Splendid Misery ” was under discussion, on the market and must bave established a posi.<br /> the Master of the Rolls made the following state. tion on the market by continuous sale.<br /> ment:<br /> (2) That products with similar names must be<br /> “Now I do not say that there could not be similar products.<br /> copyright in a title, as for instance in a whole This latter statement would appear self-evident<br /> page of title or something of that kind requiring if confusion had not frequently arisen in cases<br /> invention. However, it is not necessary to decide placed before the Secretary. For instance, a book<br /> that. But, assuming that there can be copyright of poems could not be confused with a philosophical<br /> in a title, what does copyright mean? It means treatise, nor a work of fiction with a book of<br /> the right to multiply copies of an original work. sermons, even though the names were the same.<br /> If you complain that a part of your work has There are also one or two minor points which<br /> been pirated you must show that that part is are very difficult of decision, and are too intricate<br /> original, and if it is not original you have no to be dealt with in a short article.<br /> copyright. How can the title . Splendid Misery&#039; The case in the American court above referred<br /> be said to be original when the very same words to makes it clear that if the book is out of copy.<br /> for the very same purpose were used nearly eighty right, it does not follow there is no trade mark in<br /> years ago ?”<br /> the title. But with whom the right of commencing<br /> This case was fought out mainly on tae basis, an action would lie might need some ingenuity to<br /> “Is a title copyright, and the question of trade determine.<br /> mark law on which the right of property in a title A further point arises for consideration. When<br /> rests, though dealt with, was dealt with as a a book has been produced and is out of print, and<br /> secondary point. The reason for this course in the author is deliberating, or states that he is<br /> this particular case is clear on the facts as re- deliberating, about producing the second edition,<br /> ported. Those who desire the reason are referred how far would the author have the right of<br /> to the report.<br /> stopping the production of a similar book under a<br /> · Again, (1) speaking generally, it cannot be<br /> similar title ?<br /> said there is copyright in a title.<br /> Though each case must be decided on its<br /> (2) If there is copyright, then the title must<br /> separate facts and its separate peculiarities, the<br /> claim distinct originality.<br /> broad general rule would hold that as it was<br /> impossible to buy the first book in the open<br /> That, however, there is property in a title is<br /> market, it was impossible that any of the public<br /> quite clear, and the law bearing on the right of<br /> could be deceived, and therefore the production<br /> such property comes under, and is in some way<br /> of book No. 2 could not possibly be a fraud.<br /> analogous to, trade mark law, but titles cannot be This is an imo.<br /> This is an important point, as cases have been<br /> registered like trade marks.<br /> known to occur where authors have practically<br /> The real question to consider is whether the abandoned their book, their title, and their rights,<br /> infringement amounts to a common law fraud on but have tried to revive both on seeing another<br /> the public.<br /> book produced with a similar name.<br /> This is distinctly pointed out in the case which It might be useful to quote again a case that<br /> is printed in the August number of The Author, was quoted in a former article, as it illustrates<br /> to which the reader is referred. Although decided one or two of the most important points with<br /> in the American courts, it is a case of great regard to property in a title.<br /> importance, and brings into prominence the solid Messrs. Hogg in 1863 registered an intended<br /> principle on which this question rests. There the new magazine to be called Belgravia. In 1866,<br /> Chancellor of the University of Oxford obtained such magazine not having appeared, Mr. Maxwell,<br /> an injunction against the defendant for publish in ignorance of what Messrs. Hogg had done,<br /> ing a Bible termed the Oxford Bible, which was projected a magazine with the same name, and<br /> not the “ Oxford Bible” as known on the market incurred considerable expense in preparing it and<br /> and published by the Clarendon Press. The extensively advertising it in August and September<br /> plaintiffs could not possibly have any copyright as about to appear in October. Messrs. Hogg,<br /> either in the Bible or title, and this is the point it knowing of this, made hasty preparations for<br /> is desired to make especially clear, but the defen- bringing out their own magazine before that of<br /> dant had no right to sell a product as the product Mr. Maxwell could appear, and in the meantime<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 64 (#94) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 64<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> accepted an order from Mr. Maxwell for adver- tory way of leaving the question. It gives more<br /> tising his (Mr. Maxwell&#039;s) magazine on the covers scope and adaptability, and prevents the stiffen-<br /> of their own publications; and the first day on ing that is often produced when a matter is<br /> which they informed Mr. Maxwell that they statute-bound.<br /> G. H. T.<br /> objected to his publishing a magazine under that<br /> name was Sept. 25, on which day the first number<br /> II.—COPYRIGHT IN SPEECHES.<br /> of Messrs. Hogg&#039;s magazine appeared. Mr. The House of Lords gave its decision on Aug. 6<br /> Maxwell&#039;s magazine appeared in October. Under in the appeal of Walter v. Lane, which referred<br /> these circumstances, on a bill filed by Mr. Maxwell, to the publication by Mr. John Lane in book form<br /> it was held that Mr. Maxwell&#039;s advertisements of nearly verbatim copies of Lord Rosebery&#039;s.<br /> and expenditure did not give him any exclusive speeches as they were reported in the Times. The<br /> right to the use of the name Belgravia, and that appellants, who sued on behalf of the proprietors<br /> he could not restrain Messrs. Hogg from publish of the Times, were granted an injunction by Mr.<br /> ing a magazine under the same name (the first Justice North, but he was reversed by the Court<br /> number appeared before Mr. Maxwell had pub- of Appeal (see report in The Author for Decem-<br /> lished his); and on a bill filed by Messrs. Hogg, ber last). Mr. Justice North&#039;s judgment has now<br /> that the registration by them of the title of an been restored by the House of Lords.<br /> intended publication could not confer upon them The following is a summary of the LORD<br /> a copyright in that name, and that in the circum. CHANCELLOR&#039;s opinion. We have to thank the<br /> stances of the case they had not acquired any editor of the Daily Chronicle for permission<br /> right to restrain Mr. Maxwell from using the to use their report: “I should very much<br /> name as being Messrs. Hogg&#039;s trade mark. regret if I were compelled to come to the con-<br /> This case was, contrary to “Dick v. Yates,&quot; clusion that the state of the law permitted one<br /> decided almost entirely on the aspect of the trade man to make profit and to appropriate to himself<br /> mark. Certain papers register titles, and pro- the labour, skill, and capital of another. And it<br /> duce periodically dummy copies in the hope of is not denied that in this case the defendant seeks<br /> obtaining some kind of property. Anyone who to appropriate to himself what has been produced<br /> has studied the question would at once know that by the skill, labour, and capital of others. In the<br /> this labour is wasted, and that this kind of pro- view I take of this case, I think the law is strong<br /> perty can only be claimed when a title has enough to restrain what, to my mind, would be a<br /> become associated with a certain commodity by a grievous injustice. The Copyright Act confers<br /> continued public circulation.<br /> what it calls &#039;copyright,&#039; which means the right<br /> How can a paper of which one copy only is to multiply copies, which it confers on the authors<br /> published even every day claim to be such a of the books first published in this country. That<br /> public commodity ?<br /> the publication in question, namely, &#039; Reports of<br /> The contention is absurd.<br /> Lord Rosebery&#039;s Speeches,&#039; are simply copies of<br /> From the most practical point of view, there what was first printed in the Times is not denied.<br /> fore, it is best for the author not to name the And further, it has not been, and cannot be, denied<br /> title of his book until his book is produced, if he that they were originally as in the Times, a sheet<br /> considers that there is any particular power in or sheets of letterpress, and came within the<br /> the words he is using.<br /> definition of the Act as a book. The speeches,<br /> Those who through personal experience have therefore, and the sheets of letterpress in which<br /> come across the question of title for the first they were contained, were books first published in<br /> time consider the matter as a difficulty but this country, and I confess, upon looking at the defi.<br /> recently discovered, which needs immediate nition and the right conferred, I am wholly unable<br /> amendment; they may, however, rest assured to discover why they are not protected by the statute<br /> that the question of legislating more fully on the from being pirated by unauthorised persons.<br /> point has been deeply and thoroughly discussed I do not understand the explanation the Court<br /> and considered by all those who have attempted of Appeal gives of the application of the word<br /> to legislate on copyright or who are interested in &quot;author&#039; to such publications as directories,<br /> the affairs of authorship. It is not a simple or red-books, maps, &amp;c. If the maker of a direc-<br /> one-sided question. It is exceedingly complicated tory, red-book, or map is an author, one has to<br /> and has many sides.<br /> - analyse what the distinction between the author<br /> At present no remedy has been devised suffi. as thus referred to, and the author of a spoken<br /> ciently satisfactory to embody in any of the speech. If the producer of such a book can be<br /> Copyright Bills, and the solution of each case is an author within the meaning of the Act, I am<br /> based upon the common law. On the whole, it unable to understand why the labour of reproduc.<br /> may be considered that this is the most satisfac- ing spoken words into writing or print and first<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 65 (#95) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 65<br /> publishing it as a book does not make the person qualities, but because, as I have endeavoured to<br /> who has so acted as much an author as the person point out, neither the one nor the other are con.<br /> who writes down the names and addresses of the ditions precedent to the right created by the<br /> persons who live in a particular street. The judg. statute. That right, in my view, is given by the<br /> ment of the Court of Appeal rests solely on the statute to the first producer of a book, whether<br /> use of the word &quot;author,&#039; and I cannot help that book be wise or foolish, accurate or inaccurate,<br /> thinking that some confusion has been created of literary merit or of no merit whatever. It is<br /> between two very different things. One, the said that in the view I have suggested there would<br /> proprietary right of every man in his own lite. be as many copyrights as reporters. I do not see<br /> rary composition, and the other the copyright, the difficulty. Each reporter is entitled to report,<br /> that is to say, the exclusive privilege of making and each undoubtedly would have a copyright in<br /> copies created by the statute. The question is his own published report. But where is the<br /> solely whether this book (to use the language difficulty ? Suppose à favourite view—a dozen<br /> of the statute), printed and published and exist. artists take independently their own representa-<br /> ing as a book for the first time, can be copied tion of it. Is there any reason why each should not<br /> by someone else than the producer of it, by those have his own copyright, or even a photograph,<br /> who have not produced it themselves, but have where each photograph is taken from the same<br /> simply copied that which others have laboured to point, and in the same state of the light, would<br /> create by their own skill and expenditure. It is be identical in all respects. There is, of course,<br /> admitted, apparently, by the Court of Appeal no copyright in the view itself, but in the supposed<br /> (and, indeed, insisted on as part of the reasons picture or photograph there is. It may be there<br /> for their judgment) that the owner of an unpub. is a confusion of thought between the difficulty<br /> lished manuscript, although not the author of it, of proof of the piracy and the existence of piracy.<br /> acquires copyright in it by first publishing it. There, as I have said before, no such difficulty<br /> And I observe that it is said Lord Rosebery had arises, since it is admitted that the report of<br /> no copyright in his speech, and, although he these speeches is not the result of independent<br /> could have acquired copyright in it by putting it labour, but is taken from the Times. I think<br /> into writing and printing and publishing it, he the judgment of Mr. Justice North was right,<br /> did not do so. Here, again, the implied proposi. and that the only answer sought to be given to it<br /> tion is that the only person who could gain copy. by the Court of Appeal was the restricted use of<br /> right in his speech is the person who spoke it, the word author&#039; with which I have endea-<br /> and that the word original must by construc- voured to deal. I, therefore, move your Lord.<br /> tion be read into the statute—that the true ships that the judgment of the Court of Appeal<br /> analogy is the true and first inventor of the be reversed with costs, and the judgment of Mr.<br /> Patent Laws. I think the analogy is a false one. Justice North restored.&quot;<br /> But if it were strictly pursued I think it would Lords Davey, James of Hereford, and Bramp-<br /> not be favourable to the defendant. An importer ton concurred, but Lord Robertson differed, hold.<br /> of a foreign invention is, for the purpose of the ing that, however skilful or well qualified a<br /> Patent Laws, an inventor, and, as Lord Brougham reporter might be, he could not be considered an<br /> said, there were two species of public benefactors author within the meaning of the Act.<br /> -the one, “those who benefit the public by their The injunction to restrain the publication was<br /> ingenuity, industry and science, and invention made perpetual, and the respondents ordered to<br /> and personal capability; the other, those who pay costs.<br /> benefit the public without any inçenuity or inven-<br /> tion of their own by the appropriation of the<br /> III.—MERIVALE v. HARVEY.<br /> results of foreign inventions. Now, the latter is This case has come before the Court of Appeal.<br /> a benefit to the public incontestably, and therefore The plaintiff, Mr. Herman Merivale, agreed to<br /> they renderthemselves entitled to be put upon some. write for the defendant, Mr. Martin Harvey,<br /> what if not entirely the same footing as inventors. a play connected with the exploits of Don<br /> I might paraphrase Lord Brougham&#039;s language Juan. Disputes arose with regard to the pro-<br /> by asking whether those who preserve the duction of the play and the plaintiff&#039;s fees,<br /> memory of spoken words which are assumed to be and eventually the plaintiff brought the action,<br /> of value to the public are not entitled to the claiming damages from the defendant for his<br /> analogous merit which Lord Brougham attributes breach of contract in refusing to accept the play.<br /> to the importer of foreign inventions ? I have The defence was a denial of the contract, and the<br /> not insisted upon the skill and accuracy of those submission that the non-fulfilment was brought<br /> who produce in writing or print spoken about by the plaintiff&#039;s own conduct. Defendant&#039;s<br /> words. It is not because I think the less of those counter-claim was for damages for alleged libel,<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 66 (#96) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 66<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> which was contained in a letter written by plain sittings awakened much enthusiasm. “Let us<br /> tiff to Mr. Acton Bond. The jury (see The honour and féte Joseph Lister,&quot; wrote Dr. de<br /> Author for June) found a verdict for the plaintiff Fleury on the morrow of the banquet given in<br /> on the claim for £500 damages, and with regard the British savant&#039;s honour by the Medical<br /> to the counter-claim they found there was no Faculty of Paris ; &quot; ..innovators who<br /> libel. The defendant now appealed.<br /> bring about such complete and magnificent<br /> Sir Edward Clarke, in the course of his argu- upheavals in the sphere of our activity are rare.<br /> ment, said he would agree, in order to avoid a new The work of this scientific son of the great<br /> trial on the counter-claim, that Mr. Merivale Pasteur is of incalculable import; scientific<br /> should submit to a verdict against him in regard surgery dates from him.&quot;<br /> to the alleged libel for £50.-Mr. Chambers said As to the Philosophy Congress, a full report of<br /> if this order was coupled with a withdrawal of all communications read therein will shortly be<br /> all imputations on the defendant he would accept published in four volumes respectively entitled :<br /> it.—Sir E. Clarke assented to this, and the court « (1) Philosophie générale et metaphysique; (2)<br /> gave judgment for the plaintiff on the claim for Morale; (3) Logique et Histoire des Sciences;<br /> £500, and for the defendant on the counter. (4) Histoire de la Philosophie.&quot; Subscriptions<br /> claim for £50. There were to be no costs of the for the same are being received by the secretary,<br /> appeal.<br /> M. Xavier Léon, 5, rue de Mezières, Paris. Great<br /> poco<br /> Britain is represented on the list of the Honorary<br /> Committee of the Philosophy Congress by the<br /> PARIS LETTER.<br /> names of MM. Balfour, Herbert Spencer, and<br /> Stirling.<br /> 4, rue des Beaux Arts.<br /> NHE great Exhibition is, financially, a failure.<br /> A PRODIGIOUS IMAGINATION.<br /> I Nevertheless, congresses, lectures, and The great Balzac was not particularly successful<br /> soirées de gala abound. The extraordi. as a dramatist. Undeterred by this fact, an enter-<br /> nary alternations of the thermometer appear prising playwright has already announced a new<br /> merely to affect the attendance—not the duration play taken from “ Cousin Pons,&quot; the copyright<br /> —of the various ceremonies. The seventh Inter of the Balzacian novels having expired on the<br /> national Press Congress (which has, I believe, twentieth of last month. M. Gémier is consider-<br /> chiefly occupied itself in discussing the reduction ing a three-act play, adapted from “ Colonel<br /> of the postal tariff on printed matter and the Chabert&quot; by M. Louis Forest; and several other<br /> minimum fee for Press dispatches) was inaugu. stage-writers are likewise busy in exploiting the<br /> rated under the presidency of M. William Singer, great “Comédie Humaine,&quot; which promises to<br /> proprietor of the Neues Wiener Tagblatt, and prove a second El Dorado to needy and skilful<br /> president of the committee of the Central Bureau adapters in search of thrilling situations. The<br /> of Press Associations. Prior to the invariable fertility of Balzac&#039;s imagination was extraordinary.<br /> shower of compliments with which each orator In this respect he was never surpassed. The<br /> considers it necessary to asperge the Exhibition, following anecdote (vouched for by M. Barré)<br /> M. Singer explained the object of the present attests the truth of almost incredible narratives<br /> congress.<br /> extant on the subject :<br /> “We have desired,&quot; said he, “by an inter. On one occasion, having promised M. Lireux,<br /> national organisation to offer our contribution to manager of the Odéon, a five-act drama, entitled<br /> the advent of concord—if not among the nations - Les Ressources de Quinola,” Balzac duly<br /> themselves, at least among those who form the van appeared at the appointed hour, and-leaning<br /> guard of every people, viz., the journalists. ... carelessly against a window—unhesitatingly read<br /> Thus we have decided to organise a great inter to the committee the promised five acts. After<br /> national fraternity composed of important Press the usual compliments and congratulations<br /> associations, a literary Red Cross union ... had been exchanged, M. Lireux proceeded to<br /> based upon mutual respect and firmly bound examine the manuscript, and found merely four<br /> together by the community of professional acts written—the pages devoted to the fifth act<br /> interests.&quot; About 400 persons were present at being still blank. He immediately informed<br /> the inaugural meeting. The tragic death of Balzac of his discovery. The great writer was in<br /> the Italian king prevented the attendance of the no wise disconcerted.<br /> French President.<br /> &quot; It is true,” he blandly acknowledged, “ that I<br /> BRITISH SAVANTS.<br /> have not yet written my fifth act, but I have it<br /> A propos of the International Medical Congress, so well in my head that I am able to repeat it<br /> the appearance of Lord Lister to attend its precisely as if I read it from the manuscript.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 67 (#97) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 67<br /> Besides, I have two other dénouements quite against any subsequent accusation of plagiarism.<br /> ready-in case you are not satisfied with the one The sensible verdict given by the Third Civil<br /> I have just recited to you!”<br /> Chamber a short time ago re the dispute between<br /> We doubt if the dying century can boast a two well-known dramatic authors–MM. Lecocq<br /> similar “record” memory.<br /> and Bisson-is largely responsible for this com-<br /> mendable state of affairs. The chamber pro-<br /> MM. FRANCE AND LOTI.<br /> nounced in the defendant&#039;s favour, declaring that<br /> That modern classic, M. Anatole France, is the plaintiff had done his comrade a grave injury,<br /> engaged on a new play entitled “La Gerbe,&quot; and one meriting compensation, in thus publicly<br /> destined for the Porte Saint-Martin Theatre. accusing him of plagiarism. It also expressed<br /> This will be M. France&#039;s second contribution to its opinion that “the author who knows<br /> the Parisian stage. The brilliant Academician&#039;s how to digest the works of others; who knows<br /> name first adorned the theatrical posters in 1899 how to assimilate them in his brain; who, later,<br /> in connection with “Le Lys Rouge,” which was at the moment when he wishes to originate in<br /> highly praised—but hardly popular. M. France his turn, sees them in consequence awake in his<br /> visited London last March. The &#039;impression imagination; who allows them to mingle in.<br /> left on his mind is scarcely favourable. He sensibly with his own conceptions; that author-<br /> considers the Londoners&#039; enthusiasm automatic, very far from then meriting the reproach of<br /> their loyal demonstrations lacking in warmth, plagiarism-only draws from his reminiscences<br /> richness, spontaneity. The decorations in our the legitimate recompense of a meritorious employ<br /> capital show the puerility of the national taste. of his faculties.”<br /> Even our Rubens&#039; are less powerful than those in For which and other reasons the Third Civil<br /> the Louvre.<br /> Chamber acquitted M. Bisson, ordering the inser.<br /> Nor is M. Pierre Loti a great lover of our race. tion of its judgment in three papers at the plain-<br /> In the description of his Eastern travels lately tiff&#039;s expense. Whereby it considerably lightened<br /> published by the Figaro, he expressly states that its future labours.<br /> the harrowing account he gives of the rarages<br /> made by the famine in India is not intended as a<br /> “Gyp” (COMTESSE DE MARTEL).<br /> sinister attack on “nos ennemis les Anglais,” but The novels of “Gyp,” great-niece of Mirabeau,<br /> merely as a new appeal to their charity. At the are highly popular here. Twelve editions of her<br /> present moment M. Pierre Loti-otherwise M. le “Trop de Chic” are reported to have been dis-<br /> capitaine de frégate Viaud—is en route for China, posed of in three days. Her late extraordinary<br /> serving on board the Redoutable as first aide-de- adventure—or hallucination — has proved an<br /> camp to Admiral Pottier. He has already written excellent expedient for whetting public curiosity<br /> several spirited and pathetic sketches dealing anew. At the present moment the sale of “Le<br /> with heroic combats between the French sailor and Journal d&#039;Une qui s&#039;en fiche” bids fair to equal,<br /> the cruel, dastardly Chinese. He will probably if not surpass, that of the most favoured of its<br /> add to these pages on his return. Nor is it impos predecessors. The pages of an ancient confes-<br /> sible that his present experiences may lead to a sional album have given us the following infor-<br /> modification of his opinion re the Britisher abroad. mation respecting the countess&#039; private sentiments<br /> and inclinations.<br /> A SENSIBLE DECISION.<br /> Her favourite occupation is riding; her<br /> Several dramatists have recently notified in the favourite food and drink are fruit and milk.<br /> daily papers a similarity existing between the Solitude forms her beau-ideal of happiness, while<br /> plots or titles of their half-finished productions the principal defect of her nature is her too con.<br /> with those of their brethren of the pen. Amongst fiding disposition. The ass is her favourite<br /> others, M. Lemonnier stated in an open letter animal; the sparrow, her favourite bird. Her<br /> that he bad been engaged for the last year (in · greatest misfortune would be a long life, and she<br /> collaboration with M. Burani) on a four-act considers simplicity the most desirable quality in<br /> play entitled “La Marquise de Pompadour,” a woman. The character of M. Thiers inspires<br /> destined for Réjane. Suddenly he discovers that her with the deepest aversion, her principal trait<br /> M. Emile Bergerat is also engaged in writing a being — ne pas “m&#039;gober&quot; !&#039; Maupassant is<br /> • Pompadour” for Mlle. Bartet. He immediately her favourite prose author; Heine, Baudelaire,<br /> announces the fact in the papers, and the matter and Bouchor are her favourite poets. Berlitz,<br /> ends there. M. Paul Souday has drawn up the Saint Saëns, and Offenbach, are the composers<br /> rough skeleton of a new play when he makes she prefers; while the military feat of arms she<br /> an almost similar discovery. He forthwith most admires is – the Rape of the Sabine<br /> employs the same method of protecting himself Women!<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 68 (#98) ##############################################<br /> <br /> 68<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> · Was the latter penchant a presentiment ? asks<br /> BOOKSELLER 1. STORE.<br /> her witty comrade, Sergines.<br /> The booksellers attribute their troubles to the<br /> APROPOS OF M. ZOLA.<br /> big “ department&quot; stores. They say that so long<br /> Two revivals of plays drawn from this<br /> as books are sold in department stores at prices<br /> author&#039;s works (“L&#039;Assommoir” and “ Le<br /> with which the regular bookseller finds it impos-<br /> Rêve&quot;) are now being rehearsed—the first at<br /> sible to compete, the regular tradesman cannot<br /> keep his doors open. Take the case, for example,<br /> the Porte-Saint-Martin Theatre, the second at<br /> the Opéra Comique. “La Sorcière” of M.<br /> of an enormously popular novel called “ Richard<br /> Carvel.” “Richard Carvel” was put on the market<br /> Victorien Sardou (who has just been created<br /> by the Appletons to be sold at retail at one dollar<br /> grand officer of the Legion of Honour) has been<br /> accepted by Mme. Sarah Bernhardt; M. de<br /> and fifty cents. The price at the department<br /> Porto Riche is engaged on two new plays, re-<br /> stores was one dollar and fourteen cents (45. 7d.),<br /> spectively destined for the Comédie Française and<br /> and in some it was sold at eighty-one cents<br /> the Vaudeville; and M. Maurice Donnay is like-<br /> (38. 4şd.), which is the publisher&#039;s wholesale price.<br /> wise completing a four-act play for the latter<br /> Now, many of the retailers could not buy in<br /> sufficiently large quantities to enable them to<br /> theatre. M. Jean Richepin has written an his-<br /> torical drama, entitled “La Du Barry,&quot; for Mme.<br /> obtain the book at the lowest wholesale price, and<br /> Leslie Carter M. Belasco is responsible for its<br /> as for selling it at eighty-one cents, the proposi.<br /> translation into English.<br /> tion was absurd. Of course, the retailer does not<br /> DARRACOTTE SCOTT.<br /> encounter this difficulty in the sale of every book<br /> on his list, but this condition alone cuts him off<br /> from his readiest source of profit.<br /> It is now for the publishers to determine<br /> whether they can afford to help the regular<br /> AMERICAN LETTER.<br /> retailers at the expense, if necessary, of the<br /> jobbers. One proposed plan is to fix a net retail<br /> New York City, Aug. 13. price for all books published by members of the<br /> CYO ready are the people of these States to cry association. From this price the retailer would<br /> out in horror against any combination of get a certain discount, but before he was permitted<br /> capital, that the recently formed Publishers&#039; to buy a copy of the book he would be required<br /> Association was bitterly pronounced a trust by to agree not to sell any copies at retail for less than<br /> Press and public, and anathematised as an unboly the price stipulated. “In fixing the stipulated<br /> thing. As a matter of fact it would be about as price it would be put at such a figure as experi.<br /> easy to form a “trust” of book publishers as it ence has taught should yield a fair profit to the<br /> has been to communicate with the Legations at retailer of conservative business methods. This<br /> Peking. The essential nature of the business pre- plan would apply only to the publications issued<br /> cludes it. Another wild story concerning the after the plan is adopted; no attempt under it<br /> Publishers&#039; Association ran to the effect that the would be made to regulate the price of old<br /> object of the movement was to reduce the royal publications.&quot;<br /> ties and other compensation paid to authors in the Such a scheme would carry the benefit to the<br /> future. This report occasioned so much concern author which always is the producer&#039;s when a<br /> that it seemed worth while to the officers of the uniform and fair price is maintained for the<br /> association to disclaim any such unreasonable product.<br /> and absurd motive.<br /> A SCHEME TO REGULATE PRICES.<br /> The real causes of the formal banding together But no bridge yet has been crossed, and the<br /> of American publishers are interesting and in- American Publishers&#039; Association is little more<br /> structive. The association owes its being to the than organised. Mr. Charles Scribner is the<br /> earnest appeals on the part of the retail book- president, Messrs. A. C. McClurg and George<br /> sellers all over the country that the publishers Mifflin are the vice-presidents, Mr. George P.<br /> should try to change existing conditions in the Brett is the secretary, and Col. G. B. M. Harvey<br /> trade so that the retailers could make a living the treasurer. The experiment will be watched<br /> For the past half a dozen years the retailer over with interest. Will the organisation stray from<br /> here has been losing money. His plight has now its present avowed path, and if so, to what end ?<br /> reached a pass where the publisher must act or Will it fall to pieces of its own weight, as similar<br /> the bookseller must close out his business. The organisations have done before it? Whatever the<br /> publishers therefore have organised themselves for outcome, this action of the publishers is certainly<br /> the purpose of helping the men who make it of the greatest significance in our American book<br /> possible for a publishing house to exist.<br /> world, and pregnant with engaging possibilities,<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 69 (#99) ##############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> ho<br /> Along this line a further consideration presents Byron&#039;s Profession.&#039;” Mr. Shaw continued : “ It<br /> itself. The encouragement of the retail book. seems to me that the principle involved is worth<br /> seller means the promotion of the reading of affirming by an English author in the only way<br /> better books. A lamentable result of our trade which will convey any solid impression of his<br /> conditions here has been that it is difficult to find being in earnest-namely, when he stands to lose<br /> a good assortment of good books in the retail by it. On the other hand, as American pub-<br /> shop. The dealers, owing to the general cutting lishers as a body have been repeatedly accused<br /> of prices, are all for ephemeral « leaders,” and by Englishmen of letters of &quot;pirating&#039; copy-<br /> they are actually unable to handle works of more rights-an imaginary offence, as that which does<br /> solid merit. Through some reasonable regulation not exist cannot be stolen-it is well that they<br /> of prices the interests of good literature may be too should have a printed instance on record in<br /> furthered so that dealers will be enabled to offer which that viow has been repudiated from this<br /> their customers a wider range of choice. It may side of the Atlantic.”<br /> be that the whole tone of the bookselling trade One need not comment. Harper and Brothers<br /> will be correspondingly raised. This is, at least, refused to accept even this as the proper conclu.<br /> a pleasant picture not only to the buyers of the sion of the correspondence, and so, as a solution<br /> best books, but also to the writers of them.<br /> to the singular deadlock, the honorarium was<br /> finally turned over to the American Copyright<br /> MR. SHAW AND £10.<br /> League, where, let us hope, it rests peacefully<br /> We are talking here over a correspondence, just after its fitful wanderings.<br /> made public, between Mr. Bernard Shaw and the<br /> house of Harper and Brothers. In November BIBLIOGRAPHY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE.<br /> of last year Mr. Shaw offered to return to the The English Bibliographical Society has many<br /> publishers an honorarium of ten pounds which American members, but not one of them has<br /> the publishers, in the eighties, had sent to the ever read a paper at the society&#039;s meetings or<br /> author in consideration of such moral claim as contributed a monograph for publication under<br /> he could give them on “Cashel Byron&#039;s Pro. its auspices. It is therefore with some gratifica-<br /> fession.” Mr. Shaw was of opinion that this sum tion that we note a strong plea, made in a<br /> should be repaid because a new edition of the magazine article by Mr. Josephson, of Chicago,<br /> novel had since been issued by Messrs. Brentano, for an endowed bibliographical institute here.<br /> of New York, and because the &quot;moral claim” The purpose is to be the preparation of a biblio.<br /> was worth nothing from the date of the Brentano graphy covering the entire field of American<br /> publication. And then he went on to say: &quot;I literature. At the last meeting of the American<br /> entirely disagree with the ideas of twenty years Library, held at Montreal during July, a com-<br /> ago as to the piratical&#039; nature of American mittee reported favourably upon Mr. Josephson&#039;s<br /> republications of non-copyright books. Unlike scheme, which is, briefly, a co-operative cata-<br /> most authors, I am enough of an economist to loguing of the various public libraries in this<br /> know that unless an American publisher acquires country. The editing and publishing, as well<br /> copyright he can no more make a profit at my as the scientific direction, of the work would be<br /> expense than he can at Shakespeare&#039;s by repub- in the hands of the staff of the proposed biblio.<br /> lishing ‘Hamlet.&#039; The English, when taxed for graphical institute. The realisation of this<br /> the support of the author by a price which plan would surely be acclaimed by English<br /> includes author&#039;s royalties, whilst the American speaking readers everywhere, and the results of<br /> nation escapes that burden, may have a grievance such an achievement can hardly be estimated.<br /> against the American nation; but that is a very<br /> John RUSSELL DAVIDSON.<br /> different matter from a grievance against the<br /> American publisher.&quot;<br /> The Messrs. Harper were so impressed by this<br /> illumination that they politely declined to retain<br /> the ten pounds; they thought that they had no<br /> NOTES AND NEWS.<br /> right to it. Mr. Shaw, in reply, insisted that<br /> &quot;though you are good enough to say that you N interesting correspondence on the“ Manu.<br /> have no right to it, it is clear that I have no<br /> facture of a Series” has been recently<br /> right to it—and, indeed, never had—though I Ane published in the Athenæum. The author<br /> have ingeniously excused myself from paying you concerned pointed out that he was offered a sum<br /> interest on it, on the ground that the moral of money down—say £50—and after 5000 copies<br /> right&#039; it secured you was respected up to the had been sold, the handsome royalty of a farthing<br /> date of Messrs. Brentano&#039;s reprint of Cashel a copy. The price of the book was 18. He<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 70 (#100) #############################################<br /> <br /> 70<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> refused indignantly. The editor, however, made but for recreation, we ought surely to be satis-<br /> haste to point out that the price originally con- fied when we hear that they buy the standard<br /> templated was 6d., not is., and that the royalty authors first and fiction next.<br /> would be increased. It does not appear what the<br /> increase really meant. Now, the small sum down,<br /> The extracts from the New York paper, read<br /> followed by the small royalty, after a large sale,<br /> with the remarks of our New York correspondent<br /> has become quite a common offer. Its applica-<br /> on the question of the American Publishers&#039;<br /> tion to a “series,” of which there are so many, is<br /> Association, are of great interest to authors on this<br /> in this way. One or two men, ignorant or vain,<br /> side of the Atlantic. We shall perhaps learn more<br /> are induced to give in their names as contributors<br /> about the work of the Association. Meuntime,<br /> on certain miserable terms. The names are used<br /> it is a pity that the Booksellers of the United<br /> as an inducement to get other well-known men States cannot form their own Association and<br /> to contribute. The sum paid down in advance<br /> manage their business for themselves.<br /> of royalties for each volume of the series<br /> is in many cases absurdly small. That it is<br /> so small is due mainly to the vanity of the<br /> Some of the booksellers are trying to get more<br /> authors, who think themselves honoured and<br /> net books. This is exactly what I expected. The<br /> their reputation advanced by figuring as con.<br /> partial surrender of the Englishman&#039;s liberty to<br /> tributors to a twopenny and an unsuccessful<br /> manage his business his own way is leading to<br /> series. The sum of £50 down and a farthing more complete subjection. Since the booksellers<br /> after 5000 copies have been sold is quite muni have been unable to use their own association for<br /> ficent. Of course, when the initial cost has been the regulation of their own trade, they will desire<br /> repaid, the cost of the book is very small indeed, more and more to put their necks under the yoke.<br /> so that the farthing is a hollow mockery. The<br /> Let it be remarked that booksellers seem to be<br /> deferred royalty is, in fact, now being used like the only class unable to associate for trade<br /> the old “ half-profit” method as the easiest way purposes.<br /> to escape paying the author anything and to get Of course, publishers will be very ready to yield<br /> his property for nothing. Let it be understood to pressure so long as the proposed restrictions<br /> plainly that if the royalty is deferred until the are in their own interest; so long as they think<br /> cost of production is paid it should be explained the public will support them; and so long as<br /> at the outset what this cost means, and the<br /> they are allowed by authors to manage the<br /> royalty, when commenced, must be at least half the business for their own profit. The Association<br /> trade price of the book for the rest of the edition.<br /> of Booksellers, if it would only realise the con-<br /> ditions, is in complete command of the situation.<br /> A bookseller has been lamenting, to a represen. It may fix the trade price wbich it will consent to<br /> tative of the Daily Chronicle, the deplorable run pay publishers : it may fix the discount if it<br /> upon fiction. He says that people buy nothing chooses, or, if it prefers, it may leave it to any<br /> else. He also savs, in the same breath. that bookseller to charge the public just what he<br /> everybody buys the English standard authors. pleases. I rejoice to see that Literature remains<br /> Well, but if the latter proposition is true, what sound and firm upon the point: “There certainly<br /> about the former? Granted that the public does not seem to be any reason to expect that<br /> buy the standard authors, they have on their enduring advantage will result from interference<br /> shelves a good corpus of literature: enough to with the competitive tendencies of human nature<br /> last them all their lives : they need not go out in the book trade, any more than in the trade in<br /> side their own shelves at all. What else should bicycles, in boots, in patent medicines, or any<br /> they buy but fiction ? Poetry? The general other commodities.” It is, indeed, obvious that<br /> public has never greatly cared for new poetry. the attempted system of slavish subjection cannot<br /> Essays? There are a few writers-e.g., Louis long continue. It is as impossible for publishers<br /> Stevenson and Augustine Birrell—whose essays to dictate the terms of the retailers&#039; dealings with<br /> are bought and read : the greater number of<br /> the public as for manufacturers of cottons or of<br /> essayists appeal only to scholars. Scientific any other produce. The partial success that has<br /> books? They are bought by scientific men. hitherto seemed to attend the attempt is only<br /> Sermons and religious books? They also are illusory. Being interpreted, it means nothing<br /> bought by religious people, especially Noncon- but the despair, and perhaps also the indebted-<br /> formists. Books of travel, history, biography ? ness, of a decaying trade.<br /> They are mostly too dear. Of philosophy ? They<br /> are above the comprehension of the people. When In Literature of July 28 is a list of thirty-four<br /> we consider also that people read, not for study, novels by the most popular novelists of the day<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 71 (#101) #############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 71<br /> which are announced or understood to be forth. The decision of the House of Lords in the case<br /> coming this autumn. The names of J. M. Barrie of Walter v. Lane has been received with a good<br /> and Conan Doyle are not among them. As deal of difference in opinion. One point cannot<br /> regards the latter there is very good reason for be denied : the report of a speech represents the<br /> his silence. One or two names have since been special expenditure of money and work by the<br /> added to the list. It does not seem, therefore, at proprietors of the paper. It is reasonable at least<br /> first as if the prospects of the season were so very that this special expenditure should be recognised<br /> bad after all. At the same time it must be and respected. The report of a speech, again, is<br /> remembered that in all seasons there is a demand its publication by tacit permission of the author.<br /> for the popular novelist. It is the novel that is He grants this permission to any newspaper<br /> not so much in demand—the novel by the new wbich will go to the expense of paying a reporter<br /> hand, or by the hand which, so far, has shown to take down his words. This understanding is a<br /> promise only—that will suffer by the bad season. kind of agreement. The right of the paper is,<br /> If war does harm to the bookseller, then we have however, now established. Perhaps, if the new<br /> three wars on hand : and the Americans have Copyright Bill is allowed next year to pass, it will<br /> two. But there will be, in all probability, a contain clauses for copyright in news, as well as in<br /> General Election here : and in America there will reported speeches and reports of all kinds. Once<br /> be a Presidential Election. It will surely be the law is established there will be no more diffi-<br /> common prudence to keep back doubtful.books, culties of this kind. It is quite as bad that news<br /> or books whose subjects are out of harmony with obtained at enormous expense should become<br /> the excitement and rush of politics, until the common property as soon as it is published as<br /> elections are over-i.e., until the beginning of the that the report of a speech should be considered<br /> new year. It needs no prophetic spirit to common property.&#039; _<br /> perceive that from the moment of the dissolution<br /> of Parliament to the conclusion of the General I have before me a communication from Miss<br /> Election in this country and from the present to Betham Edwards to the editor of “ M. A. P.,” in<br /> the Presidential Election of the United States which that lady laments over the good old time<br /> there will be nothing heard but the voice of the when there were such cordial relations between<br /> candidate, the roaring of the multitude, and the author and publisher, and the latter was so<br /> exaggerations and distortions of the party courteous and so generous, and invited the poor<br /> speaker.<br /> author to dinner sometimes, as one invites the<br /> poor relation. The paper proves the strength of<br /> A new monthly magazine, the Monthly Review, old traditions. The author formerly was by no<br /> is to be commenced this month by the house of means too proud to be the recipient of the pub-<br /> Murray. Their last venture into the field of lisher&#039;s “generosity,&quot; which has now become a<br /> monthly magazines was not, apparently, a word of degradation. The relations were cordial<br /> success. The editor of this new venture will be because the author placed his property unre-<br /> Mr. Henry Newbolt, who will be responsible for servedly and without any nasty conditions, and<br /> unsigned&quot; editorials ” which are to form part of without inquiry as to its value, in the hands of<br /> each number. The rest of the magazine will be the publisher. “Take my work,&quot; he said to<br /> like the other reviews. It is quite possible that the publisher, who, noble-hearted creature, was<br /> the editor will be able to impress his own person. only too ready to respond in sympathetic vein.<br /> ality upon the editorials, in which case the “Take my work. It is very likely a mine of<br /> success of the review will be assured. Nothing gold. Take it. Give me whatever you please :<br /> belps a paper more than the belief in the power you are always generosity itself. I am very poor.<br /> the principle, and the integrity, of one man. It I am glad and thankful for anything. What?<br /> was the strong personal element in the Spectator In two figures ? Oh! Large-hearted, generous<br /> that created the success of the paper. The patron of literature ! You will ruin yourself in<br /> Cornhill flourished while Thackeray held it. your kindness to the poor author! And a dinner<br /> Other examples might be quoted, but they would as well, at your own hospitable&#039; table—in the<br /> be too personal. As regards the signed articles bosom of your amiable family? With a glass of<br /> they will at least enlarge the field for authors. wine, just as if I was your equal, one of your<br /> There are plenty of capable writers on every ordinary friends ? Too much! It is too much!”<br /> conceivable subject, but on any one subject But Miss Betham Edwards is quite wrong in<br /> there are only two or three writers--perhaps considering that golden age as lost beyond<br /> only one — capable of presenting the subject recovery. The time of confidence and of depen-<br /> attractively. I wish Mr. Newbolt every possible dence is not by any means rendered impossible<br /> success....<br /> · by the Authors&#039; Society or by any syndicate.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 72 (#102) #############################################<br /> <br /> 72<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> The author has only to go back to the old con- coupon conferring benefits on young writers, ten<br /> ditions. He must not presume to ask what his times more valuable than the price of the book.”<br /> property means, or what the man who so gene- What can those benefits be ?<br /> rously relieves him of it makes out of it. There If the book contains the whole art of author.<br /> are many publishers living who would be willing ship, what remains ? Something ten times more<br /> to forget and forgive the cruel suspicions of the valuable than the price of the book. That is to<br /> day, and to go back to the old happy conditions. say, ten half-crowns, or £1 58. What is the valu.<br /> Let those who lament the past remember that it able article which can be purchased for 258.? It<br /> is always in their power to restore it. The past must be something useful to the young author-<br /> may come back again, with the courtesy so dear a pair of boots, perhaps, or a silk umbrella.<br /> to the feminine heart, and the tact and good Whatever it is, we thank the spirited and<br /> feeling which prompt the publisher not to speak reverend donor for this spontaneous gift to the<br /> about figures-sordid things !--and fill him with literary profession. We need, it is true, all we<br /> ruinous generosity and the author with tearful can get.<br /> gratitude. Let everyone who laments the past The third appearance of the Rev. J. Meldrum<br /> take these simple steps to recover and to re Dryerre is as an editor. He has already, it<br /> store it.<br /> WALTER BESANT. seems, conveyed into port a barque containing<br /> twenty stories by twenty writers, which can be<br /> obic<br /> had for the ridiculously small charge of 38. 6d.<br /> ANOTHER BENEFACTOR.<br /> The method pursued is as follows :-<br /> 1. The stories are not to be more than 2000<br /> TT is now some time since an opportunity was<br /> words in length.<br /> 1 afforded us of bringing to notice any of the<br /> 2. Each author, if his story is accepted,<br /> benevolent methods by which earnest and<br /> becomes responsible for £1 58. Is it a coin-<br /> disinterested. vessels offer assistance, wealth, and<br /> cidence that this sum is ten times the price of<br /> fame to the aspiring author. It would almost<br /> the half-crown book already offered? Can the<br /> seem as if these persons were weary of well.<br /> wall<br /> P<br /> promised coupon be ten copies of that work?<br /> doing; or as if their offers were met with cold 3;<br /> 3. The book of collected stories is to be sold at<br /> distrust. However, we are now favoured with 38.0<br /> one more enterprising and sporting proposal.<br /> 4. All the profits to be divided among the<br /> The leader, guide, and friend, the Codlin of the au<br /> his authors. Noble, indeed !<br /> whole business. is a gentleman named &quot; Rey J. 5. The editor to be recouped “necessary<br /> Meldrum Drverre.” He is a &quot; wellknown&quot; expenses,&quot; and to receive commission of 2d. a<br /> author-he says so himself, therefore not to<br /> volume.<br /> know him is to confess ignorance and obscurity.<br /> 6. Nobody is to be admitted into this fortunate<br /> He appears before us in a four-fold capacity.<br /> company who cannot command among his friends<br /> First as an advertiser. He there describes himself<br /> the sale of at least a dozen copies at 2s. 8d. -<br /> as a “successful” author. It is therefore, one Let us see how the plan works out.<br /> presumes, out of pure Christian benevolence that There are twenty writers at £1 58.; that makes<br /> he undertakes certain duties not generally per- £25, which is two-thirds of the cost of produc-<br /> formed by successful writers. He offers lessons tion. This therefore is £37 108. Very mode-<br /> in authorship-he is so successful that he is rate, too. It would seem to represent an edition<br /> above the restriction of grammar. Why should of 500 copies of an 8vo. volume containing 160 pp.<br /> he aim at grammar when he can make himself of 250 words each--that is to say, five sheets.<br /> understood without ? Thus, who can fail to It can be done for the money, binding and all.<br /> understand the following? “Lessons in Author- If it is done for less who pockets the difference ?<br /> ship offered by a successful author. Terms And what about advertising the book ?<br /> stamp.&quot; His next appearance is as the author of But the book is “ pushed” by the authors.<br /> a book on the “ Art of Authorsbip by a well- Beautiful development of the literary life! The<br /> known Author.” He thus describes it—again author has to go round begging his friends to<br /> scorning the trammels of grammar: “This book, give him 28. 8d. each. Well : such a book as<br /> giving the experience of most of our leading “Lorna Doone,&quot; or a round score of masterpieces,<br /> authors, is intended to aid those desiring to enter can be had for sixpence apiece—why, then, should<br /> the literary life. Practical and sympathetic- anyone buy, let us say, not a masterpiece, for<br /> characterise it correctly.”<br /> 28. 8d.? However, by dint of push and touting<br /> But there is more. “Each book”—this is one of the fortunate twenty gets rid, suppose, of<br /> very mysterious and attractive—&quot;contains a fifteen copies, which at 28. 8d. means 408. If he<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 73 (#103) #############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 73<br /> is wise he will repay himself that 258., and editors and publishers&#039; readers so often reject<br /> forward the rest to the editor. Suppose that the good articles and books is because they are no<br /> whole twenty get rid of fifteen copies each. judges of literature until it is printed and bound.<br /> That means 300 copies, or £40. How does it Even typewriting does not assist their judgement,<br /> work out?<br /> and “ galley” proof but little more. Indeed, the<br /> The editor takes his “necessary expenses &quot;- Ideal Editor prefers handwriting to typewriting ;<br /> say £2 108. The rest goes to the printer, or, if it seems to give him the author&#039;s thought more<br /> the cost has been less than the estimate, the fresh and hot; it helps to bring out for him the<br /> margin will pay something towards that ad, a literary physiognomy of the story or article.<br /> copy, which amounts to £2 ios. How much is The Ideal Editor appreciates style, but is no<br /> left for the Company of Twenty? But the stylomaniac. If the subject be of sufficient<br /> British public may buy the volume eagerly. interest he will accept an article and print it as<br /> Perhaps ; on the other hand, perhaps it will not. it stands, even if it be indifferently written.<br /> There is, however, a fourth character in which To give style to a man who has it not is to<br /> this versatile and reverend gentlemen appears. deprive him of marked individuality. Impotence,<br /> He has a “ Literary Bureau ” of which he is inability to express in writing may become an<br /> “Hon. Sec.” It is generally understood that interesting and entertaining phenomenon of which<br /> an “Hon. Sec.” is unpaid. The Bureau buys it would be wrong to deprive readers, as witness<br /> MSS.; sells MSS. at a 10 per cent. commission: many well-known cases. The Ideal Editor does<br /> “ considers &quot; MSS. with a view to publication in not regard it as his business to touch up the<br /> book form : gives lessons in writing short stories : style of articles until they bear no reseinblance to<br /> in writing for the Press generally : and criti. the original. Have we not seen one or two<br /> cises MSS. at 28, 6d. each if not more than 4000 magazines in which each article, however diverse<br /> words in length. The Bureau has been estab the subject, seemed to be the contribution of the<br /> lished for ten years.<br /> same pen? This was the handiwork of a stylo.<br /> One would like to ask a few questions :<br /> maniac. The ideal editor&#039;s corrections are con.<br /> (1) Have the authors of the volume already fined to slips in grammar, and even here he uses<br /> published received any of their money back? his power sparingly. It has happened to the<br /> (2) What becomes of the difference when the present writer that a purist editor—the least ideal<br /> cost of production is less than the estimate ? type of them all-has altered the expression<br /> (3) Who makes up the difference when it is “It&#039;s me!” into “It is I!&quot; The Ideal Editor has<br /> greater?<br /> been known to make changes in spelling and<br /> (4) What advertising is done?<br /> punctuation, but again only sparingly, for in<br /> (5) What were the details and the amount of both he prefers to leave free play to the individu.<br /> the “necessary expenses”?<br /> ality which both are capable of expressing. He<br /> (6) Whether the Rev. J. Meldrum Dryerre is would never, for instance, alter “shew” into<br /> the unpaid secretary of the Bureau ? If not, “show” or drop the &quot;e&quot; in judgement, but he<br /> why he calls himself “Hon. Sec.&quot; ?<br /> tries to preserve for us old friends and pleasant<br /> (7) To what authors or to what works can memories, and changes “ Kalendar&quot; into “ Calen-<br /> he refer as a successful and competent literary dar,&quot; and Aachen into Aix-la-Chapelle.<br /> agent? It is customary for literary agents to The Ideal Editor has no other profession and is<br /> produce these references in proof of competence. very diligent in his own. He keeps a MS. but a<br /> short time when it is not his intention to keep it<br /> altogether. The Ideal Editor is a gentleman, and<br /> therefore polite solicitude is another of his many<br /> THE IDEAL EDITOR.<br /> excellencies. A tender consideration, even for<br /> (From the occasional contributor&#039;s point of view.) the obscure and troublesome, animates his whole<br /> conduct. If the contributor has sent his MS.<br /> F the Ideal Editor&#039;s literary qualification this unfolded in a stiff cardboard case, the editor will<br /> U paper sayeth nought; its object is rather return it in the same case; if the contributor has<br /> to set forth, to the shame of his Philistine folded his MS. the editor will observe the same<br /> compeer, the excellencies of his rule of conduct pleats in folding and not brutally roll and crumple<br /> and the praiseworthiness of his methods of pro. it as his Philistine compeer does ; if only postage<br /> cedure.<br /> stamps and no wrapper accompanies the MS., the<br /> The first general excellency of the Ideal Editor editor in returning it is careful to use wrappers<br /> is that he can judge of the merits of a contribu. that cover the whole width of the MS., so that it<br /> tion in its MS. form. This may sound a truism, may in no way become soiled or defaced by post-<br /> but it is none the less a fact that the reason why marks or postage stamps. He has a kind heart,<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 74 (#104) #############################################<br /> <br /> 74<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> AMERICAN PUBLISHERS&#039; ASSOCIATION.<br /> 1.<br /> TNDIANAPOLIS, July 20. — The Bowen-<br /> | Merrill Company of this city, the largest<br /> publishing firm in the State, has received a<br /> circular letter from Eastern publishers asking<br /> representatives to attend a meeting to be<br /> held in New York on Wednesday next to<br /> consider a plan of co-operation whereby author&#039;s<br /> royalties may be decreased. The circular says<br /> that “if the publishers and booksellers can<br /> arrange matters satisfactorily, the sellers will<br /> not handle books of publishers not in the<br /> association and the publishers will not sell to<br /> outsiders.”<br /> Nothing is said in the circular of capitalisation<br /> or the number which it is proposed to take into<br /> the combine. —New York Sun, July 21, 1900.<br /> the Ideal Editor, and knows that one journey<br /> through the post will often give a MS. a sadly<br /> rejected look. Moreover, he is acquainted with<br /> the postal regulations; he can distinguish between<br /> home and foreign ; he is aware that the minimum<br /> for MSS. abroad is 2 d. and not—as the Philis-<br /> tines all think-id. It would grieve him to the<br /> soul to be instrumental in inflicting a postal fine<br /> on a starving contributor or to add to the<br /> exchequer of a rapacious foreign Government<br /> Further, he never sends proofs or MSS. abroad in<br /> an open gummed envelope, for he knows that<br /> certain foreign postal officials, whose patriotism<br /> gets the better of their honesty, are quite<br /> capable of closing the gummed envelope and<br /> no upon the unfortunate. perhaps&#039; stary.<br /> ing, contributor a postal fine of the value of a<br /> luncheon.<br /> When he has made up his mind to accept an<br /> article, the Ideal Editor does not selfishly nurse<br /> the fact in his bosom for six months or a year ;<br /> he is a humane man, and immediately informs<br /> the contributor of the good news. It is asking<br /> too much, but there does exist a high-souled<br /> editor-creature almost of another world—who<br /> acknowledges every MS. as he receives it. promis<br /> ing “attention in due course.” This of itself<br /> softens the blow when the “attention ” eventually<br /> does not take the form of retention ; and, when<br /> accepted, the contributor has not over long to<br /> wait for an appearance. The Ideal Editor accepts<br /> with judgement; therefore his pigeon-holes are<br /> never unduly cluttered up, not even with<br /> “ middles.”<br /> The Ideal Editor always sends two proofs-one<br /> to be returned and one to be retained. The con<br /> tributor corrects both, and is thus able to see for<br /> himself that the proof is actually printed as it<br /> leaves his hands. For I need scarcely say that if<br /> the Ideal Editor makes any changes-suggestions<br /> he would prefer me to call them—they are always<br /> made in the proof, which is never touched again<br /> after it leaves the author&#039;s hands. (N.B. The<br /> two proofs are invariably accompanied by the<br /> MS., without which a writer cannot comfortably<br /> correct the proof of a difficult article). The<br /> Philistine editor never returns the MS., even if<br /> .the substance of the article is composed of intri.<br /> cate statistics.<br /> Such, then, set forth without hyperbole, are<br /> some of the excellencies of the Ideal Editor. All<br /> honour to him. When the Philistine who is<br /> encamped over against the Sion of his sanctum<br /> shall hatte been subdued to a like rightmindedness<br /> and gentlemanliness of procedure, then the lite-<br /> rary millennium will be nigh, and the contribut.<br /> ing lamb may lie down without fear by the side<br /> of the once-dreaded editing lion. M, C.<br /> II.<br /> The American Publishers&#039; Association was<br /> formed on last Wednesday, Charles Scribner<br /> being elected president. The news of the forma-<br /> tion of the association was printed on the follow-<br /> ing day, together with many reasons for its being.<br /> Nearly every reason given was incorrect and quite<br /> at variance with the real purpose of the organisa-<br /> tion. The story most widely circulated was sent<br /> out from Chicago and was to the effect that the<br /> principal book publishers of the United States<br /> had decided to band themselves into a trust, and<br /> that the formation of an association was the first<br /> number on their programme. Another story sent<br /> out from Chicago or some more windy Western<br /> town, had it that the main object of the new<br /> organisation was to reduce the compensation to be<br /> paid to authors in the future.<br /> So far as the promoters of the organisation<br /> have read, not one of the stories printed relative<br /> to the reason for organisation and the plans for<br /> the future is correct. And right here it may be<br /> well to correct one or two of these stories. In<br /> the first place, it was never the intention of any<br /> of the publishers who had a hand in organising<br /> the association to form a trust. Anyone at all<br /> familiar with the business of book publishing<br /> knows that it would be about as easy to form a<br /> trust of book publishers, on account of the very<br /> nature of the business, as it has been to com.<br /> municate with the legations in Peking. Further-<br /> more, the association was not formed for the<br /> purpose of buying manuscripts at reduced rates<br /> or for the purpose of reducing royalties. In fact,<br /> the relations of author and publisher were not<br /> even considered in the formation of the new<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 75 (#105) #############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 75<br /> association. It was not even suggested that booksellers as well as the regular retailers, and,<br /> these relations were any part of the business or furthermore, the department stores bought many<br /> concern of such an association.<br /> more new books for which there was a popular<br /> So much for the reasons that didn&#039;t lead to the demand than most of the regular retailers. The<br /> formation of the association and for the plans department stores were good customers, and the<br /> which it never had any intention of carrying out. publishers did not feel inclined to interfere with<br /> Now, as a matter of fact, this association was their business. The demands and the pleadings<br /> formed at the request of retail booksellers all over and the requests of the retailers kept coming in,<br /> the country and after repeated and earnest plead. however, and finally, a few months ago, some of the<br /> ings on the part of the retailers that the pub publishers decided that they must do something.<br /> lishers try to do something to change existing Some of them made individual investigation as to<br /> conditions in the trade, and work out some scheme the extent to which the business of the regular<br /> by which the retailers could at least make a dealer was impaired by the book shops in the<br /> living. They have been requesting for the last department stores.<br /> two or three years. More recently they have Their investigation led them to inquire about<br /> fairly demanded some assistance from the pub. the sale of some of the popular novels. They found<br /> lishers, representing that, if they didn&#039;t get it, that the sale of “ David Harum,” for instance, had<br /> many retail booksellers would either have to close reached, at the time the investigation was made,<br /> out their business or be sold out. It was as a 500,000 copies; of “Richard Carvel,” 438,000<br /> somewhat tardy answer to this cry for help, copies had been sold. “To Have and to Hold,”<br /> coming from all parts of the country, that the 200,000; “ Janice Meredith,” 250,000; and “Red<br /> association was formed.<br /> Rock,&quot; 84,000 copies. It has not been deter-<br /> Therefore, instead of banding together to do mined just what percentage of the total sale of<br /> the public or do the authors, the publishers have the books mentioned must be credited to the<br /> really organised themselves for the purpose of department stores, but it is known to be large.<br /> helping the men who make it possible for a pub. The investigators then tried to get at the loss to<br /> lishing house to exist. It was simply a case of somebody by the cut rates at which these books<br /> helping others and thereby helping themselves. were sold in the department stores. They took<br /> For the benefit of those not familiar with the “Richard Carvel ” for their purpose because<br /> book trade it may be said that during each certain department stores were advertising this<br /> succeeding year for the past five or six years and book extensively. The book was put out by the<br /> more, the retail bookseller&#039;s business has been Appletons to be sold at retail for i dollar 50 cents.<br /> growing poorer and poorer. The inventory at the It was found that the price in many department<br /> close of each year has shown that the profit from stores was i dollar 14 cents., while at some it was<br /> the sale of books alone was less than the sold as low as 81 cents., the publisher&#039;s price at<br /> year before. The retailers saw that this thing wholesale. The cut from the regular retail price<br /> must stop or they would have to do something was therefore 36 cents. a copy in some cases and<br /> else to make a living. And yet they could see no 69 cents. in others.<br /> way by which they could change the conditions. They saw at once that the volume of business<br /> because they knew the chief cause and they were done by many retailers who had to compete with<br /> powerless to remove it.<br /> these department stores was not such as to make<br /> The alleged chief cause of the decline in the it possible for tbem to meet even the higher of<br /> trade of the retail booksellers has been the alleged the two cut prices. In the first place, many of<br /> cause of decline in other particular lines of trade the retailers could not buy in sufficiently large<br /> for many years. The booksellers laid all their quantities to enable them to buy the book at the<br /> troubles to the department store, as the shoe lowest wholesale price. From all the information<br /> dealer and the butcher and the greengrocer and that could be gathered it seemed to be true that,<br /> the þardware dealer had done before them. They in the case of many of the retailers, they could<br /> asserted to the publisher that, so long as book&#039;s not realise a decent profit and cut under i dollar<br /> were sold in department stores at prices with 50 cents. As for selling the book at 81 cents.,<br /> which the regular bookseller found it utterly the price made by the publishers to jobbers and<br /> impossible to compete, the regular men in the others who bought in large quantities, that was<br /> trade could not do business at a profit. It was to utterly out of the question. It was then for the<br /> save them from the department stores that the publishers to determine whether they could afford<br /> retailers appealed to the publishers.<br /> to help in some way the regular retailers at the<br /> For some time the publishers could not see expense, if necessary, of the department store.<br /> their way clear to assist the retailers. They were What determination was reached may be inferred<br /> compelled to look upon the department stores as from the forming of the association.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 76 (#106) #############################################<br /> <br /> 76<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> You couldn&#039;t get a publisher to admit that the<br /> association intends to antagonise a single depart.<br /> ment store in a single city in the country. On<br /> the contrary, they say they are going to get the<br /> department store to help them in the work they<br /> have undertaken. Just how they are going to do<br /> this they do not say, and it is probably true that<br /> they do not yet know. As a matter of fact, the<br /> publishers haven&#039;t got that far yet. They have<br /> really only effected an organisation and elected<br /> officers. A committee has been appointed to<br /> draft articles of association, and when it is ready<br /> to report, another meeting of the association will<br /> be held.<br /> Although no plan for aiding the retailers is now<br /> under consideration by the association as a body,<br /> the individual members are considering a scheme<br /> proposed by a man who has been in the publish.<br /> ing business over forty years in New York. At<br /> present the plan is looked upon with much favour,<br /> and it looks now as if it, or some slight modifica-<br /> tion of it, would be adopted by the association.<br /> Under this plan a net retail price for all books<br /> published after the adoption of the plan would be<br /> fixed by the association. The general scale of the<br /> prices fixed would be much lower than the retail<br /> prices now suggested by publishers to be charged<br /> for books. For instance, a book that would sell<br /> at retail, without any requirement from the pub:<br /> lisher, at I dollar 50 cents, would then be<br /> required to be sold at i dollar 25 cents.<br /> From this price the retailer would get a certain<br /> trade discount, but before he was permitted to<br /> buy a copy of the book he would be required to<br /> agree not to sell any copies at retail for less than<br /> the price stipulated by the publisher. In fixing<br /> the stipulated price it would be put at such a<br /> figure as experience has taught should yield a fair<br /> profit to the retailer of conservative business<br /> methods. This plan, as has been stated, would<br /> apply only to the publications issued after the<br /> plan is adopted. No attempt under it would be<br /> made to regulate the retail price of old publica<br /> tions. When this plan was outlined to a Sun<br /> reporter yesterday, the reporter asked the man<br /> who explained it if he expected such a scheme to<br /> be readily accepted by the department stores. His<br /> answer was:<br /> “I think we can show the department store<br /> proprietors that it will not be a bad thing for<br /> them. Of course, the publishers will continue to<br /> give the largest discount to the purchasers of the<br /> largest bill of goods, and the department stores<br /> will get the benefit of that discount. The regular<br /> retailers can find no fault with that. But it is a<br /> question of live and let live. The publishers can&#039;t<br /> live off the department stores alone, and the<br /> regular retailers can&#039;t live with the department<br /> stores under the present conditions. I think the<br /> whole thing can be laid before the department<br /> store men in such a way that they will accept it.<br /> If they don&#039;t, why we shall have to treat them, if<br /> this plan be adopted, just as we would have to<br /> treat a regular retailer who refused to accept the<br /> terms of the plan. We should then be compelled<br /> to refuse to sell to them.<br /> “But there are others to be considered besides<br /> the department stores. It is not well, for instance.<br /> to forget altogether the public. The adoption of<br /> this plan, or one something like it, would be of<br /> great benefit to the buyers of books. In the first<br /> place, the majority will be able to get their books<br /> cheaper than they would if no such plan were in<br /> force, because the majority of the buyers of high-<br /> class books, such as the members of this associa-<br /> tion publish, do not buy them from department<br /> stores. Therefore, if the plan were not in force,<br /> the majority would buy their books at the present<br /> higher scale of retail prices.<br /> “Another class that would be benefited by such<br /> a scheme would be the authors. In showing that<br /> the scheme would benefit them, I show how silly<br /> was the story that the publishers were combining<br /> against them. When it can be brought about<br /> that a uniform and fair price can be maintained<br /> for a product, the producers are always benefited.<br /> This applies to authors as well as mill hands, and<br /> the adoption of some such scheme would enable<br /> us to pay better instead of poorer rates to authors,<br /> even had we ever thought of trying to get authors<br /> to work for less.&quot;<br /> ſt was recalled by another publisher that, so far<br /> as authors are concerned, they, as a class, are not<br /> so dependent on the publishers as the publishers<br /> are on them. Of poor authors, it was said, there<br /> are plenty, but good ones are rare, and high-class<br /> publishers can never afford to work against their<br /> interests, and never have since books were pub.<br /> lished. As showing the character and standing<br /> of the publishing houses represented at the<br /> organisation of the association, it may be stated<br /> that the following were represented :<br /> D. Appleton and Co.; Bowen-Merrill Company,<br /> of Indianapolis ; Century Company; Henry T.<br /> Coates and Co, of Philadelphia ; Thomas Y.<br /> Crowell and Co.; Dodd, Mead, and Co.; Double-<br /> day, Page, and Co.; Funk and Wagnalls ; Harper<br /> and Brothers; Houghton, Mifflin, and Co.; John<br /> Lane; Lee and Shepard, Boston; the J. B.<br /> Lippincott Company, of Philadelphia; Little,<br /> Brown, and Co., of Boston; Longmans, Green,<br /> and Co.; McClure, Phillips, and Co.; the Mac-<br /> millan Company; Thomas Nelson and Sons ;<br /> G. P. Putnam&#039;s Sons; James Pott and Co.;<br /> Fleming H. Revell Company; R. H. Russell;<br /> Charles Scribner&#039;s Sons; Silver, Burdett, and<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 77 (#107) #############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 77<br /> Co.; Mays, Maynard, and Co.; and Frederick A.<br /> Stokes and Co.—New York Sun, July 29, 1900.<br /> The weakest wills are often hardest to forecast<br /> —like the weather.<br /> Virtue cannot be defined by code, for it is<br /> infinite.<br /> FINLAY GLENELG.<br /> REFLECTIONS.<br /> RT&#039;S chief end is not to teach, but to touch.<br /> CORRESPONDENCE.<br /> Genuine gospels are not sad.<br /> The only irony in Nature lies in our.<br /> selves.<br /> 1.-GOOD AND BAD ENGLISH.<br /> It is often easier to blame Providence than to MAN YOU explain what vexes my old-fashioned<br /> learn wisdom.<br /> I mind-namely, the use of the adverb once<br /> Microbes of misfortune thrive in the malaria of to mark time without its former companion<br /> misunderstanding.<br /> “when.&quot; Taken alone, it means simply that an<br /> Disease is due to lower lifeincluding our event happened on only one occasion.<br /> own.<br /> I have been obliged to look back or forward to<br /> Lower life may help the higher—to under see whether“ once&quot; meant“ once on a time &quot; long<br /> stand.<br /> ago, or whether it was used as showing that when<br /> Pessimism is a symptom of disease, sometimes some object was completed the rest followed. I<br /> canonised as natural science.<br /> have often met with it in books, and passed it as<br /> All genius, like all love, is miraculous.<br /> slip-slop-perhaps American; but I have just<br /> All science is superficial, and so is even religion. found it in a leading article in a contemporary.<br /> Genius never produces unhappiness—in the “Once, moreover, the decision has been taken,<br /> wisest.<br /> very little time is required to send out, &amp;c.”<br /> Good artists enjoy life—when free and wise. Surely it would have cost even less time to begin<br /> Freedom alone cannot guarantee wisdom. the sentence with “ When once,&quot; instead of com.<br /> Absolute freedom is only for the perfectly wise mitting a barbarism of which no quotation in<br /> —the unknown.<br /> Webster&#039;s dictionary gives an instance.<br /> No one is ever too good, or even too bad, for<br /> ONCE AND EVER A LOVER OF GOOD<br /> this world.<br /> ENGLISH<br /> The absolutely impossible is unknown to us.<br /> The unwise will blame Nature for their own<br /> vain visions.<br /> II.-WALTER v. LANE.<br /> We do not know the effect of too much wisdom, The decision of the House of Lords in the case<br /> for we have never tried it.<br /> of “Walter v. Lane” goes far to carry the point<br /> Were disease always ugly, its career would be that I first urged at a meeting of the Authors&#039;<br /> shorter.<br /> Society in the year 1891, as reported in The<br /> When Nature seems unjust, or Providence Author for Feb. 1891. What I claimed was a<br /> unwise, we only see our own images.<br /> copyright in literary style in news description ;<br /> The sub-human often mistakes itself for the i.e., I see an event, or railway accident, or fire, or<br /> supernatural.<br /> a Tsar&#039;s coronation, and I describe it in a certain<br /> The unique is only the usual.<br /> fashion; in fact, putting myself into the descrip-<br /> It is often harder to improve ourselves than to tion, and for such work I claim a copyright. Others<br /> reprove society.<br /> may describe the same event or incident, but if<br /> Love cannot fail, even when inexpert lovers they copy or choose my words, my mannerisms,<br /> must.<br /> my style, then they infringe my copyright. This<br /> All art must succeed when wise—however is just what the Times claims for its report<br /> invisibly.<br /> of Lord Rosebery&#039;s speeches. Since 1891 I have<br /> All worries are born of our weaknesses.<br /> used every opportunity for urging this claim to<br /> Facts are poor without reasons, and reasons copyright in literary style in news description, and<br /> seem poorer without sympathies.<br /> have spoken upon it at the International Press<br /> Humour is the offspring of sense and of senti. Congress at Bordeaux, Rome, &amp;c., and at Rome<br /> ment.<br /> the International Press Bureau accepted the pro-<br /> Ideal justice is still beyond human ken.<br /> position, and it will be embodied in a bill to<br /> Novel truth may become dangerous when be laid before the Berne Convention; so that in<br /> wisdom does not pilot us.<br /> time the paragraphist, who from his local know-<br /> The nether side of unhappiness is unhealthiness. ledge gives true colour or scientific insight into<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 78 (#108) #############################################<br /> <br /> 78<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> a descriptive note, will be able to prevent dozens Mr. Mackenzie Bell&#039;s poem, “Lord, teach us to<br /> of journals immediately seizing upon his well Pray,&quot; has just been published by Mr. Charles<br /> written “ par.”—for surely England, that suffers Vincent, arranged as an anthem by Herr Georg<br /> most from such “commandeering,” will not be Liebling, Court pianist to the Duke of Saxe.<br /> bebind the internationalists in journalist legisla- Coburg and Gotha.<br /> tion.<br /> - JAMES BAKER. Dr. Conan Doyle&#039;s history of the South African<br /> War is in preparation, and will be published by<br /> III.-ENGLISH AUTHORS IN THE UNITED STATES.<br /> Messrs. Smith, Elder and Co.<br /> Surely the comment upon “ Maxwell Gray&#039;s &quot;.<br /> After the flood of books on mountaineering<br /> experience is quite obvious. There are various<br /> which recent seasons have witnessed, there is<br /> justifications for the role of literary agent, but<br /> evidently to be a cessation now. So far, the only<br /> no part of his function can be, for writers of any<br /> my book of the kind announced for publication in<br /> standing, more important than knowledge of and<br /> the autumn is “In the Ice World of the Himalaya,”<br /> a hold upon the whole international market. If<br /> by Mrs. Fanny Bullock Workman and Mr.<br /> “ Maxwell Gray&#039;s&quot; affairs had been in the bands<br /> William Hunter Workman, who had many<br /> of a competent agent-by which is implied an<br /> interesting adventures in their travels.<br /> agent with, among other things, an American<br /> representative-none of these troubles could have<br /> “The Slaves of Society” is the title of an<br /> arisen. And surely, if the Authors&#039; Society is<br /> anonymous satire on modern social life and<br /> wise enough not to undertake agent&#039;s work in this usages, which Messrs. Harper are to publish.<br /> country there can be no call for it to attempt to Mr. J. Ashby-Sterry is issuing through Messrs.<br /> do it in New York, where, it being a civilised Sands a new collection of his essays.<br /> place, the business of literary agent is perfectly Mrs. Humphry Ward&#039;s new novel will be pub.<br /> well understood. THE LITERARY AGENCY. lished in the autumn. It has been appearing in<br /> 5, Henrietta-street, London, W.C.<br /> Harper&#039;s, and is called “ Eleanor.” The scene is<br /> laid in Italy.<br /> The novel upon which John Oliver Hobbes is en-<br /> gaged will be called “Love and the Soul Hunters.”<br /> BOOK AND PLAY TALK.<br /> Mrs. Mary E. Mann has written a novel<br /> entitled “ Among the Syringas,” in which a<br /> M HE Rev. C. Dudley Lampen&#039;s new story, to country clergyman is the chief character. The<br /> be published by Messrs. Everett and Co. book will be published by Mr. Fisher Unwin.<br /> shortly, is entitled “Barcali, the Mutineer: M. Leroy-Beaulieu, the well-known French<br /> a Tale of the Great Pacific.” It deals with the economist and authority on colonial affairs, has<br /> discovery of a strange colony and the doings of recently published in Paris a work of great<br /> a clever but exceedingly wicked chief engineer. interest at the present time, entitled “La Renova-<br /> Messrs. Methuen and Co. are publishing at tion de l&#039;Asie.&quot; An English translation of this<br /> once Mr. J. Bloundelle-Burton&#039;s new romance,<br /> book is to be brought out by Mr. Heinemann. It<br /> entitled “Servants of Sin,” the action of which will be edited, with a preface, by Mr. Henry<br /> takes place during the regency of the Duke of Norman, of whose “Peoples and Politics of the<br /> Orleans, and during the time of the downfall of Far East” Mr. Fisher Unwin is now publishing<br /> Law&#039;s Mississippi scheme and that of the Great a new edition.<br /> Plague of Marseilles. The main incidents of this The first number of a new half-a-crown review,<br /> story are founded upon fact, and many of the edited by Mr. Henry Newbolt, will be published<br /> characters are, under other names, persons who by Mr. Murray on Sept. 19. The founders “wish<br /> actually existed at the period; while the actual it to take its place among its old competitors in a<br /> facts themselves were unearthed by Mr. Bloun. modest and orderly manner, believing that neither<br /> delle-Burton in the libraries of Paris while &#039;pushfulness&#039; nor loud promises are likely to<br /> engaged in writing a history of the “ Three attract the readers they desire.&quot; It is to be<br /> Louis” (Louis XIII., XIV., and XV.), on which called the Monthly Review.<br /> he has for some years been occupied.<br /> Mr. Frederick A. Cook, who acted as surgeon,<br /> Mr. F. S. Ellis, who was closely associated anthropologist, and photographer to the “Belgica”<br /> with William Morris, has since the death of his expedition to the Antarctic region, is writing an<br /> friend been engaged upon a translation of “The account of that adventure. It will be published<br /> Romance of the Rose.&quot; This work will form three by Mr. Heinemann.<br /> volumes of the Temple Classics, and the first of A cheap issue of Dr. George Macdonald&#039;s novels<br /> these is just being published by Messrs. Dent. has been begun by Messrs. Kegan Paul.<br /> .._-- ---<br /> -----<br /> -<br /> -<br /> ------<br /> ---<br /> -<br /> -<br /> -<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 79 (#109) #############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 79<br /> A new book by Mr. F. C. Selous, entitled “ English Nell,” the new pla y by Mr. Anthony<br /> “ Sport and Travel, East and West,” will be pub- Hope and Mr. Edward Rose-founded on “ Simon<br /> lished in the autumn.<br /> Dale”—was produced at the Prince of Wales&#039;s<br /> Mr. Leslie Stephen&#039;s work « The English Theatre on Aug. 21. The heroine, as in the<br /> Utilitarians,” will be published in a few days. It Haymarket production referred to above, is Nell<br /> is in three volumes (Duckworth).<br /> Gwynne.<br /> In the July number of The Author a reference<br /> A play by Mr. T. P. O&#039;Connor, M.P., entitled<br /> was made to the American novel “ To Have and<br /> “ The Lost Leader,” will be produced shortly at<br /> to Hold,” by Miss Mary Johnston. It should be the Crown Theatre, Peckham. It is founded<br /> explained, however, that the title this book bears upon incidents in the career of Mr. Parnell. The<br /> in England is “ By Order of the Company.” The leading part will be played by Mr. Laurence<br /> former title was used in England by Miss Irving.<br /> Sarah Stredder, who published a novel entitled In Mr. Cecil Raleigh&#039;s new drama, “ The Price<br /> “ To Have and to Hold ” sixteen years ago. of Peace,” the opening scene is placed in a ward<br /> The first long novel that Mr. Louis Becke has of St. Thomas&#039;s Hospital; then the action passes<br /> written will be published shortly by Mr. Fisher to the Houses of Parliament, and it is under-<br /> Unwin. It will be called “ Edward Barry, South stood that the play has a political interest<br /> Sea Pearler.”<br /> throughout. Mr. Henry Neville and Miss Lettie<br /> A collection of articles on European sport is Fairfax will take the chief parts, and it is hoped<br /> being edited by Mr. F. G. Aflalo for publication to produce the play at Drury Lane on Sept. 15.<br /> by Messrs. Sands in a volume which will be called Mr. Barrie has written a new play, “ Two<br /> “Sport in Europe.&quot; Among the contributors are Kinds of Women,&quot; with which Mr. Arthur<br /> Prince Demidoff, Sir Henry Pottinger, Bart., and Bourchier will reopen the Garrick Theatre.<br /> Mr. W. A. Baillie Grohman.<br /> Mrs. Alec Tweedie is leaving shortly for Canada<br /> The Rev. H. N. Hutchinson&#039;s new work on the and the United States to pay several visits, and<br /> living races of mankind is to appear in fortnightly she purposes spending next winter in Mexico in<br /> parts, beginning immediately. Mr. Hutchinson order to write a new book on that country. Mrs.<br /> has been assisted by Mr. Lvdekker, Mr. J. W. Alec Tweedie&#039;s book, “Through Finland in<br /> Gregory, and other authorities.<br /> Carts,” is just ready in a new edition. An up-to-<br /> Collectors will be interested to note the prices date political chapter has been added, and a<br /> realised by Mr. Swinburne&#039;s books in the auction portrait of the author. Finland is of particular<br /> rooms. The following copies which were sold by interest at the moment, in consequence of the<br /> Messrs. Sotheby were presented by the author to Tsar&#039;s strange attempt to rob that interesting<br /> the late Dr. Grosart, and bore inscriptions to that country of the political rights which he himself<br /> effect :- SONGS OF THE SPRINGTIDES (1880),<br /> swore to uphold when he ascended the throne.<br /> £5 128. 6d.; MARY STUART (1881), £5 158.; The Russian language is being introduced ;<br /> TRISTRAM OF LYONESSE (1882), £5 178. 6d.; Finnish newspapers are suppressed ; the stamps<br /> A CENTURY OF ROUNDELS (1883), 26 128. 6d.; and the currency are in jeopardy. Indeed, Russia,<br /> MARINO FALIERO (1885), £5 178. 6d. ; LOCRINE in spite of her peace manifesto, is doing her best<br /> (1887), 26; A STUDY OF BEN JONSON to exterminate the independence of poor Finland.<br /> (1889), £6 29. 60.; A Tale OF BALEN (1896), It is an interesting struggle.<br /> £5 178. 6d.<br /> Miss Julia Neilson is just producing at the<br /> Haymarket (Aug. 30) Mr. Kester&#039;s “Sweet Nell<br /> of Old Drury.&quot; Mr. George Alexander also is<br /> BOOKS AND REVIEWS.<br /> now (Sept. 1) producing “A Debt of Honour,”<br /> (In these columns notes on books are given from reviews-<br /> Mr. Sydney Grundy&#039;s new play.<br /> which carry weight, and are not, so far as can be learned,<br /> logrollers.)<br /> A special matinée has been organised by Mr.<br /> Penley in aid of Mr. Arthur Pearson&#039;s Fresh Air<br /> DARTMOOR, by S. Baring Gould (Methuen, 68.), for a.<br /> Fund for the Poor, and will take place at the<br /> holiday tourist of some reading and imagination, will be<br /> says the Daily News, “a most delightful book. Soenic<br /> Great Queen-street Theatre on Sept. 15. Two<br /> description, anecdotes racy of the Devonian soil, antiquities,<br /> new plays by Mr. Edward Jones will be produced are here poured forth with a profusion which Mr. Baring<br /> on this occasion.<br /> Gould&#039;s lightness of touch and sense of order prevent<br /> Mr. Stephen Phillips&#039;s forthcoming play,<br /> from being for an instant wearisome.&quot; The Daily Chronicle<br /> says the book “is in many respects a model of its sort. Mr.<br /> “ Herod the King,&quot; will follow “ Julius Cæsar&quot; at<br /> Baring Gould has lived all his life in the neighbourhood<br /> Her Majesty&#039;s.<br /> which he describes Dartmoor has been to him, as he says,<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 80 (#110) #############################################<br /> <br /> 80<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> &#039;a passion,&#039; and he has indulged that passion in intimacy<br /> and sympathy.”<br /> ESSAYS OF JOHN DRYDEN, selected and edited by W. P.<br /> Ker (Clarendon Press, 108. 6d.), consists, for the most part,<br /> of essays which were furnished as prefaces to plays or<br /> poems. “Professor Ker&#039;s introductions,&quot; says the Daily<br /> Chronicle,&quot; have grip and suggestiveness. The notes are<br /> concise and always to the point.” Literature says that<br /> “ Professor Ker has earned the gratitude of all who love<br /> English literature by collecting and editing these scattered<br /> prefaces. His part of the work is conspicuously good.”<br /> i There is a bibliography and an index, and in some cases<br /> various readings are added from later editions which are<br /> most instructive.” “Here at last,” says the Spectator,&quot; the<br /> work of Dryden is set forth with learning, taste, and<br /> restraint.&quot;<br /> AMERICA&#039;S WORKING PEOPLE, by Charles B. Spahr<br /> (Longmans, 5s. net), “is an interesting book,&quot; says the<br /> Daily Chronicle. “Mr. Spahr draws with a firm hand and<br /> a loving touch, broadly, yet not without detail, the varieties<br /> of the great Labour class as he has studied them in different<br /> parts of his own land. He has a passion, all too rare<br /> amongst economists, for knowing about things as they are ;<br /> and in his pages we find the old factories and the new,<br /> the border community, the iron centre, and above all, the<br /> northern farm, sketched from the life, with other studies of<br /> contemporary industries and communities, alike vivid and<br /> instructive.&quot;<br /> A SPORTSWOMAN IN INDIA, by Isabel Savory (Hutchin.<br /> son, 168.) “No better written book on Indian sport has<br /> come our way these ton years,&quot; says the Daily Chronicle.<br /> “The romance of the gorgeous Eastern cities,&quot; says the<br /> Spectator, “is told with much picturesqueness, but the<br /> author is far more at home in the lonely hill.camp or beating<br /> in the jungle. To anyone who wishes to live for some hours<br /> in a fascinating world of sport and adventure nothing could<br /> be better than this gallant and light-hearted book.” The<br /> book, says the Guardian, is &quot;simply a record of a most<br /> enjoyable visit to India by a young lady, full of high spirits<br /> ... and with plenty of sound common sense and &amp;<br /> temperament that enabled her to think as well as to enjoy.<br /> The result is this extremely pleasant volume, for the author,<br /> as the guest of Sir George Wolseley, had every opportunity<br /> of seeing the best and brightest aspects of the country.”<br /> Many of the personal adventures she records, says the<br /> Daily Telegraph, are “ worthy of a hardened Nimrod.”<br /> THE UTTERMOST FARTHING, by P. B. Neuman (Black.<br /> wood, 68.), “is a very clever piece of work,” says Literature.<br /> ** The story, though trivial and unimportant, is well put<br /> together and well told, though the probabilities are not very<br /> carefully respected.” The Daily Chronicle calls it “clever<br /> and decidedly original.” Medlett and Crofts are two City<br /> men, apparently good friends, who become bitter enemies<br /> through the issue of a speculation which ruins one of them.<br /> The main theme of the story, says the Daily News, &quot; is a<br /> family fead, its leading sentiment revenge-revenge, how-<br /> ever, not of the Corsican quality, but the plain English<br /> middle-class brand.” It is “a good wholesome story, told<br /> in a plain onadorned and yet forcible manner.”<br /> ON ALIEN SHORES, by Leslie Keith (Hurst and Blackett,<br /> 68.), is described by the Daily Chronicle as &quot;altogether a<br /> well-studied and interesting story.” “There is something<br /> of Datoh fidelity in the author&#039;s painting of the Edinburgh<br /> home.” “It is a quietly amusing story,&quot; says the Spec-<br /> tator, &quot; not too short, written with great care, and, above<br /> all, with a real power of describing human nature ; and<br /> people who like these qualities will find this novel more than<br /> merely readable.” “The heroine, brought up in luxury in<br /> Portland Place, and then making the best of her stolen<br /> marriage with a City clerk, is well-drawn and lifelike.”<br /> Mis’ESS Joy, by John Le Breton (Macqueon, 68.), “ is<br /> as steeped in irony,” says the Daily Chronicle,&quot; as Mr.<br /> Hardy&#039;s masterpiece Tess,&#039; though hardly of so intense<br /> and tragic a cast.” “The story is a remarkable one, and well<br /> as Mr. Le Breton has already written, it is by far the best<br /> work we have had from his pen.&quot;<br /> A GIFT FROM THE GRAVE, by Edith Wharton (Murray,<br /> 28. 6d. net), is &quot;a work of great interest,&quot; says Literature.<br /> “The book is a purely introspective study. A man of<br /> delicate fibre commits a coarse act. He publishes the<br /> letters-practically the love-letters-of a woman who wrote<br /> them in utter confidence.” “The book is chiefly concerned<br /> with his repentance after his shabby deed has brought him<br /> all the good things he wanted, and the study in souls,” says<br /> the Spectator, “is well and cleverly done. Readers who<br /> like motives, emotions, and soul-searchings will be much<br /> interested in the story.&quot;<br /> THE STRONG ARM, by Robert Barr (Methuen, 6s.), con-<br /> sists, says the Daily Chronicle, &quot; of one longish story and<br /> several short ones, more or less connected together by a<br /> continuous thread of interest.” “There are robber barons<br /> and outlaws, and intriguing archbishops, and love, and war<br /> and all sorts of exciting things.”<br /> A PRINCE OF SWINDLERS, by Guy Boothby (Ward,<br /> Lock, and Co., 68.) is a series of stories, linked together by<br /> the identity of the hero. “Mr. Gay Boothby gives us,&quot;<br /> says the Spectator, &quot; the portrait of a magnificent impostor<br /> who unites the salient points of Messrs. Lecoq, Sherlock<br /> Holmes, and Charles Peace, the whole seen through a<br /> powerful magnifying glass.” “The stories are ingenious if<br /> not very convincing, and readers who like sensationalism<br /> and plenty of it will very likely be amused by the book.”<br /> THE CRIMSON WEED, by Christopher St. John (Duck-<br /> worth, 68.), is, says the Daily Chronicle, &quot;a study of one of<br /> those passions that can ruin a lifetime.&quot; Revenge is the<br /> &quot;crimson weed,” which takes root in the mind of Luke<br /> Grey. The book “gives evidence of considerable literary<br /> and dramatic power. The scenes are vividly realised, and<br /> the characters live, and the story, such as it is, is told with<br /> no little passion and spirit.”<br /> THE DESCENT OF THE DUCHESS, by Morley Roberts<br /> (Sands, 38. 6d.), is “&amp; thoronghly admirable piece of<br /> fooling,&quot; in the opinion of the Daily News. “It does not<br /> palpitate with actuality,&quot; says the Daily Chronicle, “but<br /> for the filling up of an hour&#039;s leisure in a shady corner of<br /> the garden on a hot afternoon it will do extremely well.&quot;<br /> THE DEAN&#039;S APRON, by C. J. 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335https://historysoa.com/items/show/335The Author, Vol. 11 Issue 05 (October 1900)<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=49&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=%3Cem%3EThe+Author%3C%2Fem%3E%2C+Vol.+11+Issue+05+%28October+1900%29"><em>The Author</em>, Vol. 11 Issue 05 (October 1900)</a><a href="https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390" target="_blank" rel="noopener">https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=51&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=Publication">Publication</a>1900-10-01-The-Author-11-5<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=76&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=1900-10-01">1900-10-01</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=89&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=11">11</a>581–9619001001The Author.<br /> (The Organ of the Incorporated Society of Authors. Monthly.)<br /> CONDUCTED BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> Vol. XI.—No. 5.]<br /> OCTOBER 1, 1900.<br /> [PRICE SIXPENCE.<br /> CONTENTS.<br /> 81<br /> ... 82<br /> Memoranda ... ... ... ... ... ...<br /> Literary Property-<br /> 1. An Important Warping ... ...<br /> 2. The Sixpenny Book ... ... ...<br /> 3. Canadian Copyright<br /> 4. The Meaning of Royalties...<br /> 5. Resolutions of the Institute of Journalists<br /> The Manufacture of a Series<br /> PAGE<br /> Paris Letter ...<br /> Notes and News. By the Editor... ...<br /> The Coming Season ... ... ...<br /> R3 The Seventh International Press Congress<br /> Correspondence-A Query ...<br /> Literary Careers Made Easy<br /> Book and Play Talk...<br /> 86 | Books and Reviews ...<br /> 85<br /> 86<br /> PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOCIETY.<br /> 1. The Annual Report. That for the past year can be had on application to the Secretary.<br /> 2. The Author. A Monthly Journal devoted especially to the protection and maintenance of Literary<br /> Property. Issued to all Members, 6s. 6d. per annum. Back numbers are offered at the<br /> following prices : Vol. I., 108. 6d. (Bound); Vols. II., III., and IV., 88. 6d. each (Bound);<br /> Vols. V. to VIII. (Unbound), 6s. 6d.<br /> 3. Literature and the Pension List. By W. MORRIS COLLES, Barrister-at-Law. Henry Glaisher,<br /> 95, Strand, W.C. 38.<br /> 4. The History of the Société des Gens de Lettres. By S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE, late Secretary to<br /> the Society. 18.<br /> 5. The Cost of Production. In this work specimens are given of the most important forms of type,<br /> size of page, &amp;c., with estimates showing what it costs to produce the more common kinds of<br /> books. Henry Glaisher, 95, Strand, W.C. 28. 6d. (Out of print at present.)<br /> 6. The Various Methods of Publication. By S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE. In this work, compiled from the<br /> papers in the Society&#039;s offices, the various forms of agreements proposed by Publishers to<br /> Authors are examined, and their meaning carefully explained, with an account of the various<br /> kinds of fraud which have been made possible by the different clauses in their agreements.<br /> Henry Glaisher, 95, Strand, W.C. 38.<br /> 7. Copyright Law Reform. An Exposition of Lord Monkswell&#039;s Copyright Bill of 1890. With<br /> Extracts from the Report of the Commission of 1878, and an Appendix containing the<br /> Berne Convention and the American Copyright Bill. By J. M. LELY. Eyre and Spottis-<br /> woode. 18. 6d.<br /> 8. The Society of Authors. A Record of its Action from its Foundation. By Walter BESANT<br /> (Chairman of Committee, 1888-1892). 18.<br /> 9. The Contract of Publication in Germany, Austria, Hungary, and Switzerland. By Ernst<br /> ST<br /> LUNGE, J.U.D. 28. 6d.<br /> 10. The Addenda to the “Methods of Publishing.&quot; By G. HERBERT TARING. Being additional<br /> facts collected at the office of the Society since the publication of the “Methods.&quot; With<br /> comments and advice. 28.<br /> 11. Forms of Agreement issued by the Publishers&#039; Association ; with Comments. By G. HERBERT<br /> TARING, and Illustrative Examples by Sir WALTER BESANT. 18.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 80 (#114) #############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> The Society of Authors (Incorporated).<br /> PRESIDENT,<br /> GEORGE MEREDITH.<br /> COUNCIL,<br /> SIR EDWIN ARNOLD, K.C.I.E., C.S.I. AUSTIN DOBSON.<br /> SIR LEWIS MORRIS.<br /> J. M. BARRIE.<br /> A. CONAN DOYLE, M.D.<br /> HENRY NORMAN.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> A. W. DUBOURG.<br /> M188 E. A. ORMEROD, LL.D.<br /> ROBERT BATEMAN.<br /> SIR MICHAEL FOSTER, K.C.B., F.R.S. GILBERT PARKER.<br /> F. E. BEDDARD, F.R.S.<br /> D. W. FRESHFIRLD.<br /> J. C. PARKINSON.<br /> SIR HENRY BERGNE, K.C.M.G.<br /> RICHARD GARNETT, C.B., LL.D. A. W. PINERO.<br /> SIR WALTER BESANT.<br /> EDMUND GOSSE.<br /> THE RIGHT Hon. The LORD PIR<br /> AUGUSTINE BIRRELL, M.P.<br /> H. RIDER HAGGARD.<br /> BRIGHT, F.R.S.<br /> THE REV. PROF. BONNEY, F.R.S. THOMAS HARDY.<br /> SIR FREDERICK POLLOCK, Bart., LL.D.<br /> THE RIGHT Hon. JAMES BRYCE, M.P. ANTHONY HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> WALTER HERRIES POLLOCK.<br /> THE RIGHT HON. THE LORD BURGH. JEROME K. JEROME.<br /> E. ROSE.<br /> CLERE.<br /> J. SCOTT KELTIE, LL.D.<br /> W. BAPTISTE SCOONER.<br /> HALL CAINE.<br /> RUDYARD KIPLING.<br /> Miss FLORA L. Shaw.<br /> EGERTON CASTLE, F.S.A.<br /> PROF. E. RAY LANKESTER, F.R.S. G. R. SIMB.<br /> P. W. CLAYDEN.<br /> THE RIGHT Hon. W. E. H. LECKY, S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE.<br /> EDWARD CLODD.<br /> M.P.<br /> J. J. STEVENSON.<br /> W. MORRIS COLLES.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> FRANCIS STORR.<br /> The Hon. John COLLIER.<br /> THE REV. W. J. LOFTIE, F.S.A.<br /> WILLIAM Moy THOMAS.<br /> SIR W. MARTIN CONWAY.<br /> SIR A. C. MACKENZIE, Mus.Doo. MRS. HUMPHRY WARD.<br /> F. MARION CRAWFORD.<br /> PROF. J. M. D. MEIKLEJOHN.<br /> Miss CHARLOTTE M. YONGR.<br /> THE RIGHT Hon. THE LORD CURZON THE REV. C. H. MIDDLETON-WAKE.<br /> OF KEDLESTON.<br /> Hon. Counsel – E. M. UNDERDOWN, Q.C.<br /> COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT.<br /> Chairman-A. HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> J. SCOTT KELTIE, LL.D.<br /> GILBERT PARKER.<br /> SIR WALTER BESANT.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> E. ROSE.<br /> EGERTON CASTLE, F.S.A.<br /> HENRY NORMAN.<br /> FRANCIS STORR<br /> D. W. FRESHFIELD.<br /> &#039;SUB-COMMITTEES.&#039;<br /> ART.<br /> Hon. JOHN COLLIER (Chairman). I SIR W. MARTIN Conway.<br /> M. H. SPIELMANN<br /> COPYRIGHT.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> A. HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> W. M. COLLES.<br /> GILBERT PARKER.<br /> DRAMA.<br /> HENRY ARTHUR JONES (Chairman). F. C. BURNAND.<br /> A. W. PINERO.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> SYDNEY GRUNDY.<br /> EDWARD ROSE.<br /> J:<br /> FIELD, ROSCOE, and Co., Lincoln&#039;s Inn Fields.<br /> G. HERBERT THRING, 4, Portugal-street.<br /> Secretary-G. HERBERT THRING.<br /> OFFICES : 4, PORTUGAL STREET, LINCOLN&#039;S INN FIELDS, W.C.<br /> A. P. WATT &amp; SON,<br /> LITERARY AGENTS,<br /> Formerly of 2, PATERNOSTER SQUARE,<br /> Have now removed to<br /> HASTINGS HOUSE, NORFOLK STREET, STRAND,<br /> LONDON, W.C.<br /> MHE KNIGHTS and KINGS of CHESS. By the Rev. MHE ART of CHESS. By JAMES Mason. Price 58.<br /> 1 G A. MACDONNELL, B.A. Price 28. 6d. net.<br /> 1 net, by post 58. 4d<br /> London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s- buildings, E.O. London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Broam&#039;s-buildings, E.O.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 81 (#115) #############################################<br /> <br /> The Author.<br /> (The Organ of the Incorporated Society of Authors. Monthly.)<br /> CONDUCTED BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> VOL. XI.—No. 5.]<br /> OCTOBER 1, 1900.<br /> [PRICE SIXPENCE.<br /> For the Opinions expressed in papers that are<br /> signed or initialled the Authors alone are<br /> responsible. None of the papers or para-<br /> graphs must be taken as expressing the<br /> collective opinions of the Committee unless<br /> they are officially signed by G. Herbert<br /> Thring, Sec.<br /> M HE Secretary of the Society begs to give notice that all<br /> 1 remittances are acknowledged by return of post, and<br /> requests that all members not receiving an answer to<br /> important communications within two days will write to him<br /> without delay. All remittances should be crossed Union<br /> Bank of London, Chancery-lane, or be sent by registered<br /> letter only.<br /> III. THE ROYALTY SYSTEM.<br /> It is above all things necessary to know what the<br /> proposed royalty means to both sides. It is now possible<br /> for an author to ascertain approximately and very nearly<br /> the truth. From time to time the very important figures<br /> connected with royalties are published in The Author.<br /> Readers can also work out the figures themselves from the<br /> “Cost of Production.”<br /> IV. A COMMISSION AGREEMENT.<br /> The main points are :-<br /> (1.) Be careful to obtain a fair cost of production.<br /> (2.) Keep control of the advertisements.<br /> (3.) Keep control of the sale price of the book.<br /> GENERAL.<br /> All other forms of agreement are combinations of the four<br /> above mentioned.<br /> Such combinations are generally disastrous to the author.<br /> Never sign any agreement without competent advice from<br /> the Secretary of the Society.<br /> Stamp all agreements with the Inland Revenue stamp.<br /> Avoid agreements by letter if possible.<br /> The main points which the Society has always demanded<br /> from the outset are :-<br /> (1.) That both sides shall know what an agreement<br /> means.<br /> (2.) The inspection of those account books which belong<br /> to the author. We are advised that this is a right, in the<br /> nature of a common law right, which cannot be denied or<br /> withheld.<br /> Communications and letters are invited by the Editor on<br /> all subjects connected with literature, but on no other sub-<br /> jects whatever. Articles which cannot be accepted are<br /> returned if stamps for the purpose accompany the MSS.<br /> GENERAL MEMORANDA.<br /> WARNINGS TO DRAMAYNIC AUTHORS.<br /> TT ERE are a few standing rules to be observed in an<br /> il agreement. There are four methods of dealing<br /> with literary property :-<br /> I. THAT OF SELLING IT OUTRIGHT.<br /> This is in some respects the most satisfactory, if a proper<br /> price can be obtained. Bat the transaction should be<br /> managed by a competent agent, or with the advice of the<br /> Secretary of the Society.<br /> II. A PROFIT-SHARING AGREEMENT (a bad form of<br /> agree<br /> In this case the following rules should be attended to:<br /> (1.) Not to sign any agreement in which the cost of pro<br /> duction forms a part without the strictest investigation.<br /> (2.) Not to give the publisher the power of putting the<br /> profits into his own pocket by charging for advertisements<br /> in his own organs : or by charging exchange advertise.<br /> ments. Therefore keep control of the advertisements.<br /> (3.) Not to allow a special charge for “office expenses,&quot;<br /> unless the same allowance is made to the author.<br /> (4.) Not to give ap American, Colonial, or Continental<br /> rights.<br /> (5.) Not to give up serial or translation rights.<br /> (6.) Not to bind yourself for future work to any publisher.<br /> As well bind yourself for the future to any one solicitor or<br /> doctor!<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> 1. N EVER sign an agreement without submitting it to<br /> the Secretary of the Society of Authors or some<br /> competent legal aathority.<br /> 2. It is well to be extremely careful in negotiating for<br /> the production of a play with anyone except an established<br /> manager.<br /> 3. There are three forms of dramatic contract for PLAYS<br /> IN THREE OR MORE ACTS :-<br /> (a.) SALE OUTRIGHT OF THE PERFORMING RIGHT.<br /> This is unsatisfactory. An author who enters<br /> into such a contract should stipulate in the con.<br /> tract for production of the piece by a certain date<br /> and for proper publication of his name on the<br /> play-bills.<br /> (6.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF PERCENTAGES<br /> on gross receipts. Percentages vary between<br /> 5 and 15 per cent. An author should obtain &amp;<br /> percentage on the sliding scale of gross receipts<br /> L 2<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 82 (#116) #############################################<br /> <br /> 82<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 5. Remember always that in belonging to the Society you<br /> are fighting the battlos of other writers, even if you are<br /> reaping no benefit to yourself, and that you are advancing<br /> the best interests of literature in promoting the indepen.<br /> dence of the writer.<br /> 6. The Committee have now arranged for the reception of<br /> members&#039; agreements and their preservation in a fireproof<br /> safe. The agreements will, of course, be regarded as con.<br /> fidential documents to be read only by the Secretary, who<br /> will keep the key of the safe. The Society now offers :-(1)<br /> To read and advise upon agreements and publishers. (2) To<br /> stamp agreements in readiness for a possible action upon<br /> them. (3) To keep agreements. (4) To enforce payments<br /> due according to agreements.<br /> THE READING BRANCH.<br /> in preference to the American system. Shonld<br /> obtain a sum in advance of percentages. A fixed<br /> date on or before which the play should be<br /> performed.<br /> (c.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF ROYALTIES (i.e.,<br /> fixed nightly fees). This method should be<br /> always avoided except in cases where the fees<br /> are likely to be small or difficult to collect. The<br /> other safeguards set out under heading (6.) apply<br /> also in this case.<br /> 4. PLAYS IN ONE ACT are often sold outright, but it is<br /> better to obtain a small nightly fee if possible, and a sum<br /> paid in advance of such fees in any event. It is extremely<br /> important that the amateur rights of one act plays should<br /> be reserved.<br /> 5. Authors should remember that performing rights can<br /> be limited, and are usually limited by town, country, and<br /> time. This is most important.<br /> 6. Authors should not assign performing rights, but<br /> should grant a licence to perform. The legal distinction is<br /> of great importance.<br /> 7. Authors should remember that performing rights in a<br /> play are distinct from literary copyright. A manager<br /> holding the performing right or licence to perform cannot<br /> print the book of the words.<br /> 8. Never forget that American rights may be exceedingly<br /> valuable. They should never be included in English<br /> agreements without the author obtaining a substantial<br /> consideration.<br /> 9. Agreements for collaboration should be carefully<br /> drawn and executed before collaboration is commenced.<br /> 10. An author should remember that production of a play<br /> is highly speculative: that he runs a very great risk of<br /> delay and a breakdown in the fulfilment of his contract.<br /> He should therefore guard himself all the more carefully in<br /> the beginning.<br /> 11. An author must remember that the dramatic market<br /> is exceedingly limited, and that for a novice the first object<br /> is to obtain adequate publication.<br /> As these warnings must necessarily be incomplete on<br /> account of the wide range of the subject of dramatio con.<br /> tracts, those authors desirous of further information are<br /> referred to the Secretary of the Society.<br /> EMBERS will greatly assist the Society in this<br /> branch of their work by informing young writers of<br /> its existence. Their MSS. can be read and treated<br /> aa a composition is treated by a coach. The term MSS.<br /> includes not only works of fiction but poetry and dramatic<br /> works, and when it is possible, under special arrangement,<br /> technical and scientific works. The Readers are writers of<br /> competence and experience. The fee is one guinea.<br /> NOTICES.<br /> M HE Editor of The Author begs to remind members of the<br /> T Society that, although the paper is sent to them free<br /> of charge, the cost of producing it would be a very<br /> heavy charge on the resources of the Society if a great<br /> many members did not forward to the Secretary the modest<br /> 68. 6d. subscription for the year.<br /> Communications for The Author should be addressed to<br /> the Offices of the Society, 4, Portugal-street, Lincoln&#039;s-inn<br /> Fields, W.C., and should reach the Editor not later than the<br /> 21st of each month.<br /> All persons engaged in literary work of any kind, whether<br /> members of the Society or not, are invited to communicate<br /> to the Editor any points connected with their work whicb<br /> it would be advisable in the general interest to publish.<br /> The present location of the Authors&#039; Club is at 3, White-<br /> hall-court, Charing Cross. Address the Secretary for<br /> information, rules of admission, &amp;c.<br /> HOW TO USE THE SOCIETY.<br /> LITERARY PROPERTY.<br /> T VERY member has a right to ask for and to receive<br /> advice upon his agreements, his choice of a pub.<br /> lisher, or any dispute arising in the conduct of his<br /> business or the administration of his property. If the<br /> advice sought is such as can be given best by a solici.<br /> tor, the member has a right to an opinion from the<br /> Society&#039;s solicitors. If the case is such that Counsel&#039;s<br /> opinion is desirable, the Committee will obtain for him<br /> Counsel&#039;s opinion. All this without any cost to the member.<br /> 2. Remember that questions connected with copyright<br /> and publisher&#039;s agreements do not generally fall within the<br /> experience of ordinary solicitors. Therefore, do not scruple<br /> to use the Society.<br /> 3. Send to the Office copies of past agreements and past<br /> accounts with the loan of the books represented. The<br /> Secretary will always be glad to have any agreements, new<br /> or old, for inspection and note. The information thus<br /> obtained may prove invaluable.<br /> 4. Before signing any agreement whatever, send the pro.<br /> posed document to the Society for examination.<br /> I.-A VERY IMPORTANT WARNING.<br /> A S during the past three months many cases<br /> have come before the Authors&#039; Society<br /> wbere a half-profit or other agreement<br /> has been entered into with a publisher and the<br /> publisher in the same agreement binds the author<br /> for the next two books on the same terms, it is<br /> our duty again to repeat that both these clauses<br /> are disastrous, the latter especially so. In many<br /> cases accounts have been brought in showing<br /> a sale of 2000 copies or thereabouts, with a return<br /> to the author on “half profits ” of perhaps £5!<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 83 (#117) #############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> .: 83<br /> Two more books on the same terms would be the sale of the sixpenny book is simply ruining<br /> quite sufficient to break any person who is striving the trade.<br /> to live by writing. It is only hoped that those 6. The author on a royalty of id., which is<br /> houses especially given to this kind of contract<br /> much larger than is generally offered,<br /> may be the first to become bankrupt.<br /> cannot expect more than £156 for 50,000<br /> copies. On a 20 per cent. royalty for the<br /> same book at the nominal price of 6s.<br /> II.—THE SIXPENNY Book.<br /> he would have £60 for every thousand<br /> I have now been able to ascertain the figures<br /> copies, or for 2500, £150. So that unless<br /> respecting the production of the sixpenny book.<br /> twenty copies are taken at 6d. to one at<br /> From estimates before me—those of a printing<br /> 68., the author will be a loser.<br /> firm of old standing—I learn that the cost of an<br /> 7. There are now a great many sixpenny books<br /> average sixpenny book of 16opp. may be computed<br /> on the market : and they are increasing<br /> at 1 d. a copy for an edition of 50,000 copies—<br /> rather than diminishing. Publishers, in<br /> i.e., about £340. This does not include advertis-<br /> fact, seem vying with each other in the<br /> ing. These copies are sold to the retail bookseller<br /> madness of the sixpenny book.<br /> at 3 d. each, and to the wholesale bookseller at 8. The dangers resulting from this misplaced<br /> 3d. The latter price, however, is by far the more<br /> cheapness are briefly these :-<br /> important, and may be taken as the average. (a) So long as books are on the stall or<br /> The cbarge to the public is 4 d. at places where<br /> counter which can be bought for 6d.,<br /> discount is allowed, and 6d. at other places.<br /> the general public will not look at a book<br /> From these figures we get the following<br /> priced more highly.<br /> facts :-<br /> It has been urged that a new public is<br /> 1. The publisher, in order to clear his bare<br /> approached with the sixpenny book.<br /> costs, must get rid of 27,200 copies.<br /> This is perhaps true, but it includes and<br /> 2. If he has to pay the author a royalty, these<br /> swamps the old book-buying public.<br /> figures must be materially altered. Thus,<br /> The public are induced to believe that<br /> if the author gets id.-sometimes he is<br /> 6d. is the just and proper price of a<br /> offered a simple farthing !—the publisher<br /> book of any kind. This evil, which so<br /> must get rid of more than 36,000 copies<br /> largely contributed to the International<br /> in order to clear these bare costs.<br /> Copyright Act in the United States, has<br /> 3. He is then left with 13,720 copies. On the<br /> already begun in this country. It will<br /> whole, if he clears off the complete edition,<br /> of necessity produce the same effects<br /> he makes the sum of £128, out of which<br /> here as were complained of there—viz.,<br /> he has to pay for such advertising as he<br /> the impossibility of the author making a<br /> thinks necessary, and his office expenses,<br /> livelihood by his work. Now, for imagi.<br /> travellers, clerks, &amp;c.<br /> native work it is most important that<br /> 4. Most of the books offered at 6d. belong to<br /> the author should be independent and<br /> the publisher, and are not loaded with any<br /> should be able to live in a certain amount<br /> royalty. In that case, the sale of the com.<br /> of ease.<br /> plete edition would produce about £285,<br /> The people cease to prize what they can<br /> subject to the above deductions. The<br /> get for nothing. They have to pay a<br /> question then arises whether, for the sake<br /> shilling for a seat in the gallery of a<br /> of this profit, it is worth while to lose the<br /> theatre: if they can get the finest work<br /> sale of the more highly-priced works.<br /> of contemporary fiction for 6d., which<br /> 5. The bookseller, on the other hand, sells the<br /> will they value the more highly, an<br /> book at 4 d., and gets a profit of one<br /> evening at the play or a novel by — ?<br /> penny.<br /> They imbibe a contempt for literature<br /> A London bookseller of importance computes<br /> as a thing which by those who produce<br /> that he disposes of the sixpenny book at the rate<br /> it is considered of no value.<br /> of 500 copies a week. That is to say, he realises<br /> The bookseller, already on the verge of<br /> a profit of a little over £2 a week, which does not<br /> ruin, is driven down still lower.<br /> even cover his rent. It is not likely that many 9) The author of the sixpenny book suffers,<br /> booksellers get through a greater number every<br /> as we have seen, but the author of the<br /> week.<br /> 6s. book is in imminent danger of<br /> Another bookseller reports that no one will look<br /> extinction.<br /> at any other book so long as the sixpenny book It seems as if the rational method of procedure<br /> can be obtained. It is obvious, therefore, that would be to reserve for the sixpenny editions<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 84 (#118) #############################################<br /> <br /> 84<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> only those books which have stood the test of of Canada to legislate for itself in such a manner<br /> time, and have become popular works. It may as to override the Imperial Act; but fortunately<br /> then be presumed that the earlier edition is in the no Canadian legislation upon these lines ever<br /> hands of all who can afford to give the higher obtained the Royal Assent.<br /> price, while the cheap edition appeals to the wide In 1895, when the discussion was very acute,<br /> class of those who cannot afford to give so much. the Society of Authors, whose sense of responsi-<br /> It would be still more rational if the lowest bility as to the question had been constant and<br /> price of the popular book were to be one shilling. sincere, considered what further steps should be<br /> Would it not be possible for the author to taken to put forward clearly the case of Imperial<br /> guard against the danger, in his own interests as copyright. Mr. Hall Caine was at that time<br /> well as those of other writers, of booksellers, about to leave England on a tour in America, and<br /> and the general public, by inserting a clause in the committee of the Society gladly accepted his<br /> his agreements forbidding the sixpenny edition services as a delegate of the Society during his<br /> except with the consent of the author himself or visit to Canada. Mr. Hall Caine rendered mate-<br /> his agent ?<br /> W.B. rial help to the cause in which the Society was<br /> ---<br /> interested, and received the committee&#039;s cordial<br /> acknowledgment of his zealous and valuable aid.<br /> III.-CANADIAN COPYRIGHT.<br /> It is not, however, necessary now to enter into<br /> (Reprinted by kind permission from the Times of Aug. 31.) the details of his negotiations, since the copyright<br /> The question of Canadian copyright, which has question entered on a fresh phase with Sir John<br /> been the stumbling-block to copyright legislation Thompson&#039;s death. A new Government suc-<br /> and to copyright reform for the past thirty ceeded, and Sir Wilfrid Laurier became Premier<br /> years, seems now to be within reasonable distance of Canada.<br /> of settlement. This desirable situation is largely In the beginning of 1898, Mr. Gilbert Parker,<br /> owing to the constant attention and labour of the a member of the committee of the Society of<br /> Incorporated Society of Authors. In 1875 the Authors, learnt that the question of copyright<br /> Canadian Government brought in a Copyright was again likely to be brought forward; and the<br /> Bill for Canada which obtained the Royal Society of Authors at once drew up a statement<br /> Assent, but this Act was unsatisfactory to the as to the course which copyright legislation<br /> Canadians, as, though it was considered that it should take according to their opinion for the<br /> would override the Imperial Act, their courts benefit of all authors of the Empire. In the<br /> decided in Smiles v. Belford that this view of summer of that year, when certain Canadian<br /> the law could not stand. In 1886 the Imperial Ministers were in England, the secretary of the<br /> Parliament removed another colonial difficulty by Society had a long interview with them at Mr.<br /> giving copyright to a book wherever published Parker&#039;s house. It was then thought well that<br /> within the British Empire.<br /> the Society should send over a delegate to Canada<br /> Still, for various reasons which it is unnecessary to put forward their views. The secretary of the<br /> to enumerate here, the Canadians were discon. Society was appointed to fill the post. Copyright<br /> tented ; and, in the early nineties, soon after the legislation was, however, postponed in Canada ior<br /> passing of the American Act, Sir John Thompson, the moment; but in the autumn of the following<br /> thinking, no doubt, that the Canadian trades had year-1899—at the expense of the Society, the<br /> been injured by this Act, issued a report which secretary sailed for Canada. Mr. Gilbert Parker,<br /> was based on a desire to stimulate the trade of who had taken so inuch interest in the matter,<br /> the printers and publishers in Canada to the was in Canada at the same time, and had informed<br /> disadvantage of Canadian authors and tbeir the Society of Authors that he would give his<br /> property, as well as of British authors and their best assistance to the secretary in order to help<br /> property. The Authors&#039; Society did not find it him to carry through this important question.<br /> possible to support this report, thinking it The secretary had the honour to interview the<br /> antagonistic to the proper evolution of copyright Premier and other members of the Canadian<br /> law. The Society based their opinion on the fact Government who were especially concerned with<br /> that an author&#039;s work is his own property, and the question of copyright legislation; and he was<br /> should not be hampered by any trade considera assured not only that the Government was<br /> tion the effect of which was to deprive the author sympathetic towards the views put forward by<br /> of his legitimate profits.<br /> the Society, but also that the question of the<br /> During the next few years Sir John Thompson printing clause and the licensing methods which<br /> carried on the agitation very keenly. It would had been put forward on previous occasions would<br /> appear that he was concerned to raise a Consti- be practically laid aside. After discussing this<br /> tutional and Imperial question as to the rights difficult question with all those in Canada who<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 85 (#119) #############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> Let us go on to the book of which 3000 at least<br /> are printed. The cost of this edition, including<br /> advertising, may be set down at about £150.<br /> The average price being 38. 7d., we have the<br /> following results if the whole edition is sold out:<br /> On a royalty, per cent. ... | 10 15 20 25 30 35<br /> were chiefly concerned, and after obtaining the<br /> support of the Canadian Society of Authors, then<br /> in its infancy, the secretary returned to London<br /> with the promise that, if possible, the Canadians<br /> would legislate on the lines suggested.<br /> At the beginning of this year a Bill was<br /> brought forward by the Minister of Agriculture,<br /> within whose department copyright business lies,<br /> giving to the Canadian publisher complete secu-<br /> rity where he had contracted with the author for<br /> the exclusive right of publication in Canada,<br /> without burdening the author with any trade<br /> restrictions. This Bill received the assent of the<br /> Canadian Parliament in July, and practically<br /> closes in a satisfactory way to all those concerned<br /> this very difficult and troublesome, but important,<br /> question.<br /> There is only one thing left to be the crowning<br /> point of the work of the Society in this direction<br /> —that is, the passing of Lord Monkswell&#039;s Copy.<br /> right Bill in the next Session. The Bill embodies<br /> the terms of the Canadian Act just passed, and<br /> if it becomes law will practically confirm the<br /> Canadian legislation on this question.<br /> Author.............................. | 90 135 180 225 270315<br /> Pablisher ....<br /> 297 | 252 | 207 162 117 72<br /> But the net system is being introduced. The<br /> public will before long find out that this means<br /> taking more money out of their pockets; and<br /> taking more money, out of their pocke<br /> booksellers will find out, sooner or later, that<br /> they cannot become slaves and clerks to pub-<br /> lishers. Meantime, if the 6s. book is to be sold<br /> at 58. net, the trade price is 38. rod. Now, let us<br /> see what royalties mean on this scale, taking as<br /> before an edition of 3000.<br /> On a royalty per cent. 10 | 15 | 20 | 25 | 30 | 35 |<br /> The author will receive 75 112 150 187 225 262 300<br /> The publisher<br /> 1350 1313 275/238 200 | 163 125<br /> IV.-THE MEANING OF ROYALTIES. * Royalties must not be counted 13 as 12.<br /> It is now some three years since the meaning<br /> The author must be very careful, therefore, to<br /> of Royalties was set forth in these pages. It is<br /> understand that under a net system royalties<br /> now time to repeat, with some amendments and<br /> mean figures very different from those where<br /> discount prevails. Part of the eagerness with<br /> corrections.<br /> We take, as usual, the 68. book—not necessarily<br /> which some publishers want to extend the net<br /> a novel,<br /> system is due to the ignorance of authors as to<br /> First, an edition of 1000 copies-10 sheets of<br /> the meaning of royalties.<br /> 32pp. each, about 30 lines or 280 words to a<br /> But, it will be argued, the whole edition of<br /> page, small pica type— costs about £60, with such<br /> 3000 copies may not be sold out. What would<br /> small advertising as an edition of this number<br /> happen then?<br /> can bear, about $70 at the outset.<br /> Let us take two cases—one in which 2000<br /> The price to the trade averages 38. 9 d., to the<br /> copies are sold and one in which 2500 copies are<br /> distributors about 28. sd. The average is about sold. In both cases a certain amount of binding<br /> 38. 7d., in some cases perhaps 38.6d. We 18 saved-say, £10 and 5 respectively.<br /> formerly took it at 38. 7d.<br /> Then for a sale of 2000 copies we have:<br /> Every edition gives, on the estimate stated at<br /> the Congress of Publishers, “overs” at the rate of On a royalty per cent. | 10 | 15 | 20<br /> 10 15 20 25 30 35 40<br /> 2 per cent., i.e., so many copies not used in making<br /> up deficiencies. We may deduct forty copies for The author receives ..50<br /> Press, which leaves 980, and we will suppose that Tbe publisher receives 193 168<br /> the book is one of the half successes which sells<br /> these 980 copies and no more. The publisher<br /> On a sale of 2500 :<br /> therefore pays £70 for 980 copies, which are sold<br /> at 38 7d., producing say £175. If he gives the<br /> On a royalty per cont. 10 15 20 25<br /> author a shilling royalty the latter makes £49<br /> and the publisher £56. If he gives the author The author receives ... 62 91 124 186<br /> £20 down and a royalty of a shilling to begin<br /> The publisher receives / 272 243 216|179<br /> 179 148<br /> after 600 are sold, he gets a little more and the<br /> author a little less. It would hardly be worth<br /> while to consider this class of book, but for the<br /> fact that there are so many of them.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 86 (#120) #############################################<br /> <br /> 86<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> V.—THE INSTITUTE OF JOURNALISTS.<br /> At the annual conference of this Institute, held<br /> in London under the presidency of Sir James<br /> Henderson, the following were among the resolu.<br /> tions adopted :<br /> That the Copyright Bill recently before Parliament was<br /> ansatisfactory, inasmuch as clause 12, in attempting to<br /> institute copyright in news, gives no protection to the<br /> individual journalist who supplies news, but only to the<br /> nowspaper proprietor or the news agency which publishes<br /> it, and fails to show how nows wbich has become common<br /> property (as it does on publication) can be made the basis<br /> of an action without andae restraint of journalistic enter.<br /> prise and freedom; and this conference is of opinion that<br /> &amp; clause which more strictly defines the right of a reporter<br /> or contributor in the literary form of bis report or com.<br /> munication, will be of more value to the working journalist<br /> than any attempt to create copyright in nows qua news.<br /> That editors be discouraged from inviting oontribations<br /> to their journals from persons of wealth and position, thus<br /> depriving of valuable space those who are journalists by<br /> profession, and who have no means of living except by their<br /> profession.<br /> M<br /> THE MANUFACTURE OF A SERIES.<br /> HE following printed letters are taken from<br /> the Athenæum of Aug. 4, 1900:-<br /> THE MANUFACTURE OF A SERIES.<br /> The following correspondence is interesting as throwing<br /> an ugly light on the way in which a series may be manu.<br /> factured. A well-known author writes to us :<br /> &quot;Some time ago I got an offer to write a book for a small<br /> sum down (I forget how much-say £50), and then, after<br /> the sale of 5000 copies, to receive £1 per 1000 copies as<br /> royalty. I scoated the proposal, as one of the many tentative<br /> ones I have had, to see how many innocent or vain men of<br /> letters could be enticed to work for nothing, and I said so.<br /> After some months the following correspondence ensued,<br /> which I think bighly instructive, and perbaps worth pub-<br /> lishing (1) in order to warn simple people, (2) in order to<br /> test whether my inclosed letter, sent back to me as very<br /> improper, is indeed so objeotionable a document:<br /> “&#039; DEAR SIR, -You may remember that some months ago<br /> I wrote inviting you to contribute to &amp; series of -<br /> Manuals. Mesers. have been distressed to find what<br /> had not been brought to their notice, that, besides the sum<br /> offered for the work, a royalty so small as £i per thousand<br /> after the sale of 5000 copies was proposed. This was, I can<br /> gay, a remnant of the smaller form in which the scheme was<br /> started. I feel it only due to them to stato, even at this late<br /> date, that upon discovery of the error thoy at once autho-<br /> rised me to saggest a royalty much more adequate for a<br /> book reaching a sale of 5000 copies.-Regretting the acoi.<br /> dental oversight, I am yours faithfully, i<br /> «• DEAR SIR,-I am obliged for your further note, and<br /> hope that as Messrs. — have recognised the great<br /> inadequacy of the offer originally made for them, you have<br /> acquainted such authors as were induced to acquiesce therein<br /> Otherwise these poor people will be the<br /> victims of a serious mistake.--I am, yours sincerely,<br /> who declined or were unable to contribute. The sum<br /> offered, down, for the work was approved by the publishers.<br /> But the royalty to be paid after the sale of 5000 copies bad<br /> been overlooked by their literary adviser, and not been<br /> brought before their notice until after some of the proposals<br /> had been made. The pound per thousand was a remnant of<br /> the suheme when it was intended to issue the books at 6d.<br /> For similar books at that price (sold at 4£d.) - ased<br /> to give that royalty with less money down. When it was<br /> decided that the price should be a shilling, this matter was<br /> overlooked not through my mistake or the publishers&#039;.<br /> They were distressed [!] when they found that a farthing a<br /> copy after a book bad proved itself successful bad been<br /> offered. I spontaneously proposed to write to all and<br /> pravent misapprehension. I have taken trouble to make the<br /> whole case plain to you. I have received several replies ;<br /> none, like yours, gratuitously anxious about my “poor<br /> victims.” That you should have oriticised the terms as to<br /> royalty was only proper. But as to the tone and taste of<br /> your last letter-dear, dear! I hope you may wish to put<br /> it in your own fire! All the same, although I have secured<br /> some good writers of note, I could have wished that you<br /> had seen your way to contribate, and that the probable<br /> returns on a shilling book had justified the offer of a more<br /> tempting sum.-I am, yours faithfully, - -&#039;<br /> The correspondence is exceedingly interesting<br /> to all technical writers, men of science, medicine,<br /> theology, &amp;c., and points clearly to the fact that<br /> the same methods are still being pursued upon<br /> wbich the Society of Authors has from time<br /> to time thrown strong light-methods which,<br /> entirely satisfactory to the publisher, afford to<br /> the author but a small return for what must be<br /> the result of a long study. The reason why these<br /> methods are still-pursued and are still successful<br /> lies chiefly in the fact that the authors entrapped<br /> are not in the first instance authors that live by<br /> their pen, but those who, giving a constant and<br /> laborious study to one of the learned professions<br /> or sciences, desire from time to time to proclaim<br /> those studies to the public. With the very best<br /> intentions, therefore, they are constantly under-<br /> selling not only writers in their own profession,<br /> but in the profession of letters generally. In a<br /> small pamphlet issued by the Society of Authors<br /> and circulated largely among educational writers,<br /> dealing with the publication of educational works,<br /> the subject of the sort of agreements that are<br /> offered by publishers has been fully dealt with,<br /> and it would be as well to reprint part of that<br /> statement here.<br /> The agreement, it will be noticed, quoted in the<br /> first paragraph, bas some remarkable features in<br /> common with the agreement in the correspond-<br /> ence. The fact, however, need not necessarily be<br /> deduced that both agreements emanated from the<br /> same publishing house.<br /> DEFERRED ROYALTY.<br /> 1. The worst feature that one observes is the deferred<br /> royalty. Tbe author is induced by the bribe of a small<br /> sum, generally £25, to accept an agreement by which he<br /> actually gives tbe publisher many thousand-say, soven to<br /> ument:<br /> “DEAR SIR,--My recent note needed no acknowledg.<br /> ment, but your reply requires a word of notice. Your kind<br /> hope that I acquainted contributors with the improved terms<br /> is justified. I did so at once before writing to those<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 87 (#121) #############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 87<br /> ten-copies for himself, should the book succeed! After , Or the book might be transferred to some other house<br /> this the author is to have 10. or perhaps 15 per cent. Let where it would conflict with another book on the same<br /> us, remembering that even with books actually carrying subject. Such transfers are not unknown.<br /> great risk the publishers never used to venture on asking Or the publishers might resolve not to re-edit the book in<br /> for more than half profits, consider what this means.<br /> favour of a new one which might sell better.<br /> Most of these works are small books, published at 28. or<br /> half-a-crown. It must be a very expensive little book that,<br /> Right OF AUTHOR TO RE-EDIT.<br /> offered at 28. 6d., would cost more than 6d. to produce in a 13. One additional proviso should be added to the present<br /> large edition of 6000, including advertising. This means notes. In a case where the author sells his copyright, a<br /> an apparent risk of £75. As for the cost of advertising, system of which the Society gravely doubts the expediency,<br /> the sum of £10 spent in advertising means no more than but which perhaps for some reason the author might desire<br /> kd. a volume for an edition of 6000. As educational books to adopt, it is absolutely essential that the author should<br /> are published, the publisher gets about 18. 3d. a copy, or bind the pablisher, in caso a fresh edition is wanted, to give<br /> gd. a copy profit, taking, of course, an average book of the him the option to re-edit upon a fixed notice. The following<br /> size and price ander consideration. So that in, say, 6000 clause appears in a publisher&#039;s agreement where he has pur-<br /> copies he gains £250, less what he advanced the author, chased the copyright:<br /> say £25. In fact, this agreement says, practically, to the “ “ The said author, in consideration of the payments and<br /> author : “ Yours is the book : it is your property, your royalties reserved to him ander this agreement, undertakes,<br /> estate: if I administer it I must have for the first 6000 as occasion may require, to edit new editions of the said<br /> copies nine times your share. Afterwards, at a 10 per work, and supply any new matter that may be necessary to<br /> cent. royalty, I am to have three times your share.&quot;<br /> bring the information contained in the work up to date.&quot;<br /> What is the way to put an end to the acceptance of This is very clumsily expressed. The author, so far as<br /> these one-sided terms ? The first thing is to pour a flood<br /> the words go, binds himself to re-edit, but the publisher, on<br /> of light upon the situation, so that everyone shall clearly the other hand, does not bind himself to ask the author to<br /> understand it. Afterwards to refuse the agreement on sach<br /> do so. If this be the proper construction of the clause, the<br /> terms, and to take the book elsewhere.<br /> author might find himself in the position of having his book<br /> ro-edited by an incompetent hand with no redress.<br /> AMOUNT OF ROYALTIES.<br /> 2. Ten per cent. aged to be considered a very fair royalty. [The above paragraphs are irregularly numbered<br /> This means, however, that with a large sale the publisher owing to the fact that the least important have<br /> generally gets about three times what he gives the author! been cut out owing to pressure of space.]<br /> SMALL Sums PAID TO GREAT SCHOLARS.<br /> Though these warnings still hold good, and<br /> 4. There is a certain series of books, all of which have<br /> should be carefully considered by all those to<br /> run into many thousands of copies. It will hardly be whom the publishers are making offers, yet it is<br /> believed that the publishers have actually offered one of our not these warnings which are especially the<br /> greatest living scholars £35 and £40 respectively for the subject of this paper, but the methods publishers<br /> preparation and editing of two books in this series !<br /> employ to inveigle an author to write for these<br /> BINDING CLAUSES.<br /> &#039;scientific or educational series, and No. 4 of the<br /> 7. The author frequently contracts not to write another &quot;paragraphs printed above is the first step the<br /> book on the subject. We never find, however, the publisher<br /> publisher generally adopts. He offers a price up<br /> entering into a similar contract not to publish another book<br /> to, say, £50 to the best known authority on one of<br /> on the subject. It is essential that either both or neither of<br /> the parties to the contraot should be bound by such a<br /> the subjects of the special series which he is<br /> stipulation.<br /> about to produce, for choice selecting an indivi.<br /> “ODD COPIES.&quot;<br /> dual who is known to the world rather as a<br /> 9. In one case a publisher so far presumed upon the student than as a writer. The person with whom<br /> ignorance of his author as to insert a clause stating that for<br /> he corresponds, sometimes forgetful that the book<br /> “ odd copies&quot; no royalty should be granted ! In other<br /> words, if a bookseller ordered single copies of the work, the<br /> he is asked to write is the result of years of<br /> aathor was to have nothing. Res ipsa loquitur.<br /> research and labour, only for the moment con.<br /> scious that he has the knowledge at his finger<br /> “ 13 AS 12.&quot;<br /> ends, and that the only labour to him is the<br /> 10. In some agreements the royalties have to be<br /> labour of putting it down on paper, at all times<br /> paid on the sale of “13 as 12.” This means knocking<br /> entirely ignorant of the fair market price of his<br /> off 8 per cent. from the author&#039;s profits, and as the pub.<br /> lisher does not sell thirteen copies as twelve except in work and the profits it will bring, accepts the<br /> special cases where a batch is ordered, be must not account proposition without a murmur. The publisher<br /> at this rate as if the practice were universal.<br /> is generally aware that this will be the case, but<br /> SALE OF COPYRIGHT.<br /> on occasions the specialist may demur to the<br /> 12. Perhaps the most unfair clause of these agreements is<br /> terms. He then tries someone else who has an<br /> that which assigns the copyrights of the book to the pub. equally large knowledge of one of the other<br /> lisher. The dangers behind this clause are unbounded. subjects which goes to compose the series until at<br /> Above all things, an educational writer must keep the last a contract is settled. The matter. however.<br /> control of now editions. This he cannot do if the copyright<br /> is in the hands of his publisher, nor can he prevent addi.<br /> is generally settled at the first offer.<br /> tions, alterations, and omissions to the book except by<br /> To all those who are constantly writing either<br /> expensive lawsuits, which may, after all, go against him. on technical subjects or general literary matter<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> M<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 88 (#122) #############################################<br /> <br /> 88<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> there is considerable experience as to the prices biographer who is writing in order that his<br /> that should be demanded and are readily paid friend&#039;s memory may live. There is the philosopher<br /> by publishers, and the gentleman whose name who wishes to embody the thoughts of a lifetime in<br /> starts the series would be the last, if the matter one volume. There are others of the same kind<br /> was put before him, to crush down or undersell too numerous to mention.<br /> his own profession, but this result unfortunately In many cases the publisher goes to these dis-<br /> happens owing to his ignorance of the current tinguished people and makes them an offer, and<br /> price.<br /> the contract is signed before they can take advice,<br /> The next step in the publisher&#039;s tactics is to or if they take advice, they take the advice of<br /> draw up a prospectus and to issue a circular. those who themselves know nothing of the<br /> This he sends round to the other well-known matter.<br /> students and writers of the different professions, There are some of these distinguished people<br /> or the different branches of study with which he who go direct to the publisher. In this case they<br /> is concerned.<br /> are to a large extent at the mercy of the house<br /> Very often these are men who are writers with which they are dealing, but in all cases a<br /> rather than students, to the same degree as the man who writes a single book falls an easy prey<br /> leader of the series who is already bound was and gets absolutely inadequate terms. Many of<br /> student rather than writer.<br /> these books of memoirs go into numerous editions,<br /> In consequence, he is often met with a remon- and are, even under disadvantageous terms, a pro-<br /> strance at the miserable terms offered and the perty to the author; only by some stray chance<br /> unsatisfactory agreement proposed. The reply his eyes are opened to the fact that with a reason-<br /> of the publisher is ready at once. Mr. --, or able contract he might have obtained at least<br /> Lord — , or Professor , has consented to three times as much as the amount he has<br /> open the series on an agreement similar to the received<br /> one offered, and if these gentlemen can write on It is more difficult for the Society and the<br /> these terms, surely the objector cannot think of Society&#039;s work to reach the author of the one book<br /> asking terms higher than those who with so large than it is to reach the writer in a series, for in a<br /> a reputation have already given their consent. series it often happens that inter-correspondence<br /> Finally, the publisher succeeds in getting his takes place, whereas in the other case the author&#039;s<br /> series completed on a set of contracts highly position is isolated.<br /> satisfactory to himself, but of poor value to the<br /> G. H. Thring.<br /> author. T&#039;he publisher is not to blame.<br /> He trades on the credulity of writers to the<br /> 14-<br /> same extent as other traders do in dealing with<br /> PARIS LETTER.<br /> their customers, but he has one larger factor in<br /> his favour-namely, the ignorance of authors.<br /> To avoid, if possible, the occurrence of the<br /> 4 bis, rue des Beaux Arts.<br /> same tactics, the Society of Authors has from INTERNATIONAL congresses are still a<br /> time to time printed statements analogous to the favourite feature of the great Exhibition.<br /> statements placed here. It is only by spreading<br /> They arouse little enthusiasm here, and<br /> such statements widely that the difficulty can be appear comparatively barren of result. The<br /> avoided, and it is hoped that every writer before Academical Congress-one of the most important<br /> whom this paper falls will endeavour to commu- of the series, to which delegates from all the prin-<br /> nicate it to those other members of his profession cipal European universities were invited-was<br /> who are in ignorance of its substance.<br /> not particularly brilliant. The Fourth Inter-<br /> As a corollary to this it would be as well to national Psychological Congress awoke more inte.<br /> put forward the case of those writers also who rest. It was presided over by M. Ribot, member<br /> for some reason are writers of one book only. of the French Institute and author of the famous<br /> There are hundreds of writers who come within “Maladies de la Mémoire,” “Psychologie des<br /> this category, and nearly all of them fall into Emotions,&quot; &amp;c. M. Charles Richet, of the Revue<br /> the same trap.<br /> Scientifique, was vice-president; while the post<br /> There is, for instance, the man who has lived of secretary-general was filled by M. Pierre Janet,<br /> an active life, and would like to record his supplementary professor of experimental psycho-<br /> memoirs. There is, again, the man who has logy at the Sorbonne, whose able treatises on<br /> attempted to reach the North Pole, and would “Automatisme Psychologique,” “L&#039;Etat mental<br /> like to give a description of his voyage, or the des Hystériques,&quot; &amp;c., have won their author a<br /> man who has crossed South Africa, and would European renown. The congress was sub-divided<br /> like to describe his adventures. There is the into six sections, respectively dealing with com-<br /> ----<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 89 (#123) #############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 89<br /> parative, introspective, experimental, pathologic,<br /> The Grand Prix GOBERT.<br /> hypnotic, and social and criminal psychology. The French Academy has bestowed the Grand<br /> The subject was evidently popular. Authors, Prix Gobert on M. Pierre de La Gorce for his<br /> philosophers, doctors, priests, Jesuits, Dominicans, “Histoire du Second Empire”-an unfinished<br /> physiologists, spiritualists, Brahmins, Hindoos, work which already comprises four ponderous<br /> criminologists, and a goodly number of the fair tomes and fifteen out of the twenty years&#039; reign<br /> sex, attentively followed the somewhat languid of Napoleon III. It is to be hoped that this<br /> discussions which only once kindled into warmth premature recompense will not deter M. de La<br /> during a debate on hypnotic and suggestive Gorce from finishing his undertaking, as was the<br /> psychology<br /> case with two of his predecessors. His history<br /> Twenty-two nations sent representatives to the embraces a period extending from the coup d&#039;état<br /> International Congress of Librarians, presided of 1851 to the morrow of Sadowa. It is written<br /> over by M. Léopold Delisle, general administrator in a masterly style — clear, nervous, animated<br /> of the Bibliothèque Nationale. Its sittings - and well merits the signal honour it has<br /> terminated with the decision that henceforth an received, the Grand Prix Ğobert being one of<br /> International Congress of Librarians should be the most coveted distinctions in the gift of the<br /> held once in every five years. This appears to French Academy. No Academician being allowed<br /> have been its most important motion. Three to compete, Augustin Thierry, the historian,<br /> anonymous donors have offered prizes varying formerly preferred obtaining the Gobert prize to<br /> from twenty to forty pounds for the best memo- donning the palms of the Immortals.<br /> randum on the most efficacious method of destroy. The Goncourt prize has not yet been awarded.<br /> ing the insects which infest books. Intending It will become the property of the author who<br /> .competitors who desire further information on the shall have produced the best prose work of imagi-<br /> subject are asked to communicate with the secre- nation during the course of the present year, the<br /> tary-general of the Librarians&#039; Congress, M. ten members comprising the Goncourt Academy<br /> Henry Martin, Bibliothèque de l&#039;Arsenal, Paris. being judges on this delicate point. In his latest<br /> testament M. de Goncourt further expresses the<br /> A Good YEAR FOR DRAMATISTS AND<br /> desire that this prize be given “à la jeunesse, à<br /> COMPOSERS.<br /> l&#039;originalité, au talent, aux tentatives nouvelles et<br /> The annual report of the Société des Auteurs et hardies de la pensée et de la forme.&quot; A good<br /> Compositeurs Dramatiques states that the Parisian chance for the rising author.<br /> theatres have paid in royalties the sum of<br /> 2,123,847 francs 50 centimes during the year<br /> STAGE LITERATURE.<br /> 1899-1900, being 4276 francs 15 centimes less The lights of the dramatic fraternity are all<br /> than the amount previously registered. The under arms for the approaching Christmas<br /> Departmental theatres have disbursed 968,575 season. M. Abel Hermant “ très snob, délicat,<br /> francs 60 centimes in royalties, showing an la moustache légère,” is established at the Villa<br /> augmentation of 12,372 francs 35 centimes on Bassaraba (Haute-Savoie), engaged on a five-act<br /> the sum paid during the preceding year. The play. That prolific writer, M. Gaston Devore, is<br /> foreign theatres have expended 300,223 francs at Ballaigues (Switzerland), occupied in putting<br /> 70 centimes in royalties, being an advance of the finishing touches to as many as four new<br /> 11,967 francs 15 centimes on the amount regis contributions to stage literature--to wit, “Les<br /> tered in 1898-99. The sixty Parisian cafés. Complaisances,&quot; a five-act play; &quot;La Domes-<br /> concerts have done still better, having paid tique,” a domestic drama in five acts, destined for<br /> 265,742 francs 70 centimes in royalties, showing the Antoine Theatre; “Le Rêve,&quot; a philosophical<br /> an increase of 56,443 francs on the sum paid play written for the Vaudeville; and a drama<br /> during the preceding year. One hundred and dealing with social problems entitled“L&#039;Individu.”<br /> five new associates have been admitted to the M. Marcel Prévost, now at Trondhjem (Norway),<br /> society, and five members have received pensions. has just finished a piece in four acts entitled<br /> The number of pensioners now on the society&#039;s “Unis,” which has been accepted by the manager<br /> books is no fewer than in persons. Six hundred of the Vaudeville Theatre, while M. Jules<br /> new plays have likewise been catalogued by the Chancel is writing a play drawn from M.<br /> society as having been performed either in France Prévost&#039;s two latest novels, “Frédérique&quot; and<br /> or abroad during the year 1899. In short, the “Léa.” The erudite M. Stanislas Rzewuski is<br /> Société des Auteurs et Compositeurs Dramatiques completing two plays commenced long since. The<br /> shows a most praiseworthy budget, and is to be first is a study of modern manners, whose title<br /> congratulated on the success which has attended has not yet been decided on; the second is a<br /> its efforts.<br /> sumptuous historical drama entitled “Louise de<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 90 (#124) #############################################<br /> <br /> 90<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> San-Felice.” The plot of the latter is laid in accomplished-after twenty years&#039; wrangle there-<br /> Italy at the beginning of the eighteenth century. on. Greater laxity will henceforth be shown in<br /> It depicts the pretended rivalry existing between all Government examinations, and a host of minor<br /> Maria-Carolina of Austria, Queen of Naples, and innovations and simplifications will be admitted-<br /> a fictitious heroine created by the author. The or rather tolerated by the State examiners. The<br /> chivalric General Championnet, the subtle Cima stringent rules respecting the accord between the<br /> rosa, a sphinx-like Horatio Nelson, and the past participle (when construed with the first<br /> beautiful Emma, Duchess of Hamilton, are among auxiliary) and its complement are no longer<br /> the dramatis persona. M. Henri Lavedan is immutable as the laws of the Medes and<br /> likewise engaged on a new play, as are also MM. Persians ; while the ubiquitous hyphen has<br /> Maurice Ordonneau, Pierre Valdagne, Eugène ceased to be a primary necessity. M. Georges<br /> Berteaux, Pierre Wolff, Arthur Bernède, Leygues, Minister of Public Instruction, has<br /> Alexandre Bisson, Henry Kistemaeckers, Antony undoubtedly been lenient ; which leniency has<br /> Mars, Pierre Decourcelle, and others.<br /> given rise to some lively discussion. In an able-<br /> and interesting article on the subject, published<br /> MEMORANDUM DE BARBEY D&#039;AUREVILLY. in the Revue des Deux Mondes, M. Brunetière<br /> “Le Premier Memorandum de Barbey d&#039;Aure. sensibly remarks : “A language is an historical<br /> villy,” now published by Lemerre, is anterior by formation; and in its history the only facts to<br /> twenty years to the volume issued in 1883 under be taken into account are the works of the great<br /> the same title. The present edition records the writers.” M. Leygues is evidently of the same<br /> mode of life and daily impressions of the great opinion.<br /> French writer during his early youth. The<br /> New PUBLICATIONS.<br /> analytic talent which won him fame in later “Blancador l&#039;Avantageux,&quot; by M. Maurice<br /> years is here clearly apparent, scenes and persons Maindron ; “ Edition définitive de Balzac,” which<br /> being portrayed with the minute precision of a edition comprises fifty volumes (chez Ollendorff);<br /> Pepys and the psychological intuition of a “ La Vie à Paris (1899),” being a continuation of<br /> Bourget. In one of Count Fleury&#039;s latest works, the annual collection of daily articles by M. Jules<br /> “ Louis XV. intime et les petites maîtresses,” a Claretie (chez Charpentier); “La Charpente,” a<br /> list is given of the natural children and descen- social study by M. J. H. Rosny (à la Revue<br /> dants of that monarch. Among the latter figures Blanche); “ Les Victimes Grimacent !” by M.<br /> the name of Barbey d&#039;Aurevilly.<br /> Frédéric Boutet, a novel dealing with the vices of<br /> The second volume of the late Francisque the classes and the misery of the masses; a trans-<br /> Sarcey&#039;s “ Quarante ans de théâtre ” has just been lation from the Polish of the famous “Quo.<br /> issued by the library of “Les Annales politiques Vadis ? ” of M. H. Sienkiewicz; “Les Rois du<br /> et littéraires.&quot; It is devoted to appreciating Ruisseau,” by M. Maurice Astier, being a detailed<br /> the works of Molière, and the classic school account of the manners, customs, and habits of<br /> represented by Regnard, Marivaux, and Beau. that curious biped, le chiffonnier—the French “rag<br /> marchais, also of Le Sage, Piron, Gresset, Favart, and bone” man (Libraire du Livre Moderne);<br /> and Sedaine. No man ever had a keener percep and the “ Mémoires de Rossignol,” ex-police<br /> tion than Sarcey of the perplexities wbich beset the inspector, a terrible narrative of the crimes,<br /> dramatic critic&#039;s path. “ The theatrical critic,&quot; passions, and weaknesses of the darker side of<br /> wrote “the good uncle” on one occasion, “must humanity.<br /> DARRACOTTE SCOTT.<br /> also have his scale of proportion understood by<br /> the public. But what shall it be? This is a grave<br /> question, and one more difficult to resolve than is<br /> generally imagined. To crush M. d&#039;Ennery under<br /> NOTES AND NEWS.<br /> the name of Corneille, to measure MM. Marc-<br /> Michel and Labiche with Beaumarchais would DROFESSOR DOWDEN suggests in Litera.<br /> be an absurdity, if not an injustice. But on the P ture the celebration of the opening of the<br /> other hand, are all souvenirs of the past, all the<br /> 20th century by an “adequate” history<br /> conditions of antique art, to be cast asideas of English literature. If the Professor would<br /> has been done with the ell and other ancient elaborate the scheme for such a history it<br /> measures ?”<br /> would be a practical step. Perhaps no one<br /> could be found among the critics of the day<br /> ORTHOGRAPHY AND SYNTAX REFORM.<br /> who would be more generally accepted as the<br /> The reform of French orthography and the editor of such a work. It would be a colossal<br /> abolition of the incomprehensible “ chinoiseries &quot; undertaking, but the success of other great<br /> of the old French grammar have at last been undertakings—the “Encyclopædia Britannica&quot;<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 91 (#125) #############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 91<br /> and of the antiquary we should have a judicious<br /> blend. Let us seriously consider the formation of<br /> such a company.<br /> for instance, and the “ Dictionary of Biography&quot;<br /> -should be an encouragement. I would suggest<br /> the formation of a company for the purpose. The<br /> capital required would depend upon the scheme<br /> itself—the number of volumes necessary; the<br /> payment of contributors; the office expenses;<br /> the price of the work when complete and in<br /> parts. Thus there would be:<br /> (1) The preliminary expenses.<br /> (2) The expenses of office rent, clerks, &amp;c.<br /> (3) The editor&#039;s salary.<br /> (4) The pay of the contributors.<br /> (5) Cost of printing, paper, binding, &amp;c.<br /> The volumes would have to be issued regularly<br /> at intervals of a quarter. From certain rough<br /> calculations I believe that the whole expense<br /> would amount to less than £2000 a volume of the<br /> size of the “ Dictionary of National Biography.&quot;<br /> How many volumes would Professor Dowden åsk<br /> for?<br /> As regards the success, we must remember that<br /> the establishment everywhere of the free library<br /> greatly helps the production and lessens the risk<br /> of embarking in these large enterprises. We<br /> might expect a thousand copies at least to be<br /> taken up by the free libraries all over the English.<br /> speaking world, provided that the work was not<br /> only written by scholars, but also by attractive<br /> writers. There would be no publisher behind<br /> it: the company would be an ordinary trading<br /> company. I believe not only that it would be a<br /> most useful contribution to the history of litera-<br /> ture, but that it would be immensely successful.<br /> I beg to invite very serious attention to the<br /> warning under the head of Literary Property. It<br /> is directed against the practice, common with one<br /> or two minor publishers, of inserting a clause in<br /> the agreement promising the publisher the<br /> author&#039;s next two books! Anything more foolish<br /> than to accede to the impudent demand it is<br /> difficult to imagine. Does a physician make a<br /> patient promise to come to him with his next two<br /> ailments? Does a solicitor bind down a client<br /> for his next two cases ? It comes to this : that<br /> although an author may be fleeced and robbed by<br /> his publisher, he will go to him twice more!<br /> Great as may be the desire to see oneself in print,<br /> there should be, one would think, some restrain.<br /> ing force in self-respect. WALTER BESANT.<br /> THE COMING SEASON.<br /> 1<br /> \HE following is a classification of the books<br /> announced in the Athenæum between<br /> Aug. 18 and Sept. 29 inciusive:<br /> The publishers represented are Messrs. George<br /> Allen, Burns and Oates, Chambers, Constable,<br /> Clark, Chatto and Windus, Cambridge University<br /> Press, Cassell, Clarendon Press, Dent, Duckworth,<br /> Heinemann, Hutchinson, Methuen, Macmillan,<br /> Maclehose, Marshall, Richards, Sampson Low,<br /> Sonnenschein, Seeley, Skeffington, Unwin, Whit-<br /> aker, Wells Gardner, Black, Rivington, Chapman<br /> and Hall, Matthews, and Bemrose. The list is<br /> not therefore complete, but there are not many<br /> left of the publishers worth considering.<br /> The result is interesting. It comes out as<br /> follows:<br /> . Works announced.<br /> Theology ...<br /> ......... 98<br /> History and Biography ..............<br /> Travel ......<br /> Science ..........<br /> Scholarship .............................<br /> Philosophy<br /> Law<br /> Political Economy<br /> Essays ......<br /> Fiction ........<br /> .................. 164<br /> Children&#039;s books ......................... 30<br /> Poetry and Plays......<br /> ............ 29<br /> There are a few difficult to classify. There are<br /> also translations and new editions which are not<br /> entered in the above list. In connection with this<br /> list it will be interesting to watch and to classify<br /> the books which appear from day to day in the<br /> 114<br /> One thing is most important. I am sure that<br /> Professor Dowden would agree in my contention<br /> that it is a great mistake to suppose that because<br /> a man has written poetry or fiction with more or<br /> less success, he is therefore a critic.<br /> &quot;The critical<br /> The critical<br /> faculty is not the same as the imaginative; one<br /> might even go further and say that the develop-<br /> ment of the critical power tends to destroy the<br /> imagination. There are at the present moment<br /> half-a-dozen critics who stand in the front rank.<br /> It would be invidious to mention their names,<br /> Not one of these has distinguished himself<br /> by any imaginative work. On the other hand,<br /> there are as many writers on literature, writers of<br /> appreciation, who are most attractive and delight-<br /> ful, yet are not critics. There are also anti-<br /> quaries who collect facts and figures and write<br /> about them, but they are not critics. Of the<br /> gentlemen who write “reviews,” log roll and<br /> depreciate, set up little cénacles and make a fuss,<br /> I do not speak, because the editor of this great<br /> work will assuredly have none of them. But of<br /> the true critic and of the man who can appreciate<br /> ............<br /> ......<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 92 (#126) #############################################<br /> <br /> 92<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> morning papers as “ Publications of the Day.&quot; M. Hebrard, of Le Temps ; England, Mr. S.<br /> One notes that the publishers of fiction seem to Campion, J.P., of the Northampton Mercury,<br /> be decreasing in number. Seven publishers bave Miss G. B. Stuart being the English secretary ;<br /> 120 novels between them.<br /> Germany, Hans Tournier; America, Mr. Young;<br /> There follows next the somewhat delicate ques Sweden, M. Beckman; Hungary, M. Joseph<br /> tion: how many of these books will pay ? This Veszi. The abstention of a goodly number of<br /> involves the question : how many are paid for by well-known French journalists from being present<br /> their authors ?<br /> proved that, like the Institute of Journalists in<br /> We may rank them in four classes :<br /> England, they have their little dissensions amongst<br /> * 1. Those which are quite certain to allow of a themselves. M. Jean Bernard again brought<br /> large edition or several editions with a good margin. forward his project for making the staff of a<br /> 2. Those which will allow of a single edition newspaper participators in the profits; at Rome<br /> with a small margin.<br /> he argued warmly for this, and he was now<br /> 3. Those which are doubtful.<br /> requested to draw up a report upon the subject-<br /> 4. Those which will not pay expenses, unless an interesting but somewhat impossible proposi.<br /> the reader&#039;s judgment is wholly incompetent. tion. M. Taunay, the energetic and ever-affable<br /> It would, of course, be invidious to name the general secretary, then brought forward his<br /> books which belong to any of the four classes. report upon a card of identity for journa-<br /> It is, however, noteworthy that, taking only lists, members of the various societies affiliated<br /> fiction, no fewer than sixty belong undoubtedly to the International Bureau. Armed with<br /> to the first class, while the second class is this card the journalist in any country is<br /> represented in fiction alone by about sixty more. to address himself to the representatives of<br /> What is wanted by writers of the first and second the committee of direction, or to the local<br /> classes is to remember that they have property associations, correspondents of the Bureau, and<br /> in their hands as real as, say, horses or cattle, he will have all facilities given him as a local<br /> which are, like most books, perishable. The journalist. The question of tariff for the post of<br /> whole parade and pretence about risk, office ex. newspapers was next considered, Signor Berger<br /> penses, and percentages should be pushed aside. arguing that the cost should never exceed two<br /> The only question is on what terms the adminis. centimes, instead of five, for international<br /> iration of the property should be granted, or at postage, and a half, or at most one, centime for<br /> what price it should be sold.<br /> interior postage; and the Bureau was authorised<br /> to take up negotiations with the various Govern. ,<br /> ments to obtain some reductions in the tariffs.<br /> The subject of telegraph tariffs was again intro-<br /> THE SEVENTH INTERNATIONAL PRESS<br /> duced by Señor de Berazza, the Spanish dele.<br /> CONGRESS.<br /> gate, and he was able to announce that, in<br /> By JAMES BAKER, F.R.G.S.<br /> addition to the conventions between France and<br /> Spain, Luxembourg, and Portugal, this year<br /> INHE meeting this year was arranged for under certain conditions the convention and<br /> T Paris, to coincide with the Great Exhibi. restriction had been agreed to between France<br /> tion; and at Rome last year great were the and England, but Italy still failed to fall into<br /> rumours of what this Congress was to be. How line, while pourparlers were still going on with<br /> it was to eclipse all former Congresses in work and Sweden and Norway.<br /> in play, in hospitality and in excursions; one Following this a discussion occurred on<br /> excursion, it was hinted, would include Algiers. an abbreviated code for telegrams, and a<br /> But there is a French proverb of few words, prize is to be offered for the best working<br /> L&#039;Homme propose mais Dieu dispose, and not code. The other subjects discussed included<br /> only the fates, but the weather, seemed to defeat the constitution of an international tribunal of<br /> the generously hospitable aims of the French arbitration for journalistic matters. Upon<br /> organisers.<br /> this a brisk discussion ensued, and a M.<br /> On the first morning of the Congress the news Rouzier claimed attention for a tribunal to<br /> arrived of the assassination of King Humbert, settle disputes between directors of journals and<br /> and so all official entertainments were cancelled, reporters. Tbe evergreen, but never settled,<br /> and the President of the Republic was not subject (either in England or with the inter-<br /> present at the opening séance in the Amphi. nationalists) of a school of journalism was brought<br /> théâtre of the Sorbonne. At the first business up by M. Bernard under the presidency of<br /> meeting on the following morning the presidents M. Beckman, the learned Swedish delegate.<br /> for each nation were elected—viz., for France, The Belgian delegate, Heinzman-Savino, declared<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 93 (#127) #############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 93<br /> that the quickest way to vulgarise the teaching right to it and may do what he chooses with it-<br /> of journalism, or at least of certain subjects e.g., sell it for publication with or without the<br /> necessary to journalism, was to obtain the estab. author&#039;s name? This might certainly not be<br /> lishment of courses upon the subjects in the agreeable to the author of the matter in question,<br /> universities. At Heidelberg already Professor but what is the law ?<br /> DusTMAN.<br /> Koch has a journalistic course. The final [The case quoted above is sadly wanting in<br /> subject discussed was the rights of illustrators, legal exactness, and it is exceedingly difficult to<br /> and M. Janzon proposed that the central com. give a definite opinion on it. The finder might<br /> mittee make a study of the status of the journalist have a right to sell the paper with the writing<br /> in various countries. At the conclusion of the upon it, but certainly not the right of publication.<br /> work Mr. P. W. Clayden, the English president, The publication of a MS. is an entirely distinct<br /> gave a formal invitation to the Congress from the property, and cannot be thus dealt with.-G. H.<br /> city of Glasgow to assemble there in 1901. This THRING.]<br /> invitation was referred to the Central Bureau.<br /> It would be as well for the Congress to meet in<br /> Great Britain, and for once to adopt English<br /> LITERARY CAREERS MADE EASY.<br /> rules of debate. The Je demande la parole of<br /> gentlemen who have already spoken a dozen times In the old-fashioned days when a man wrote a book,<br /> delays real progress.<br /> That was all there was for him to do ;<br /> If they made it worth while for the author he took<br /> The English papers prepared for the Congress<br /> were: by Mr. F. Dolman, on “The Advantages<br /> Up bis pen and reeled off something new.<br /> of International Association,&quot; an advantage which<br /> Bat to-day, when a man writes a book tbat&#039;s a hit,<br /> Why, that&#039;s jast made a sort of a start,<br /> is immense, as I have proved in such countries as For he has to write others explaining how it<br /> Poland, Galicia, &amp;c.; and a well-written, eloquent Came out of his houd and his heart.<br /> paper on “Ideals of Journalism,&quot; by Mr. S. He must tell how he thought of the story and when-<br /> Campion, in which he pleaded that the Press How many words daily he wrote -<br /> should not become a cloaca maxima ; that evils If he set down the lines with a pencil or pen-<br /> and festering sores of humanity should be treated<br /> These are things he must carefully note.<br /> with the surgeon&#039;s knife, and not “ with the He must give us the names of the people he took<br /> lingering affection of gbouls for fætid corrup-<br /> For nis models, and nothing omic !<br /> tion.&quot;<br /> In these days when a man makes a bit with a book<br /> He can write all his life about it!<br /> The social functions were, alas, almost oblite-<br /> Chicago Times-Herald.<br /> rated ; and as if Nature also worked against<br /> the French organisers, the great representation in<br /> the Théâtre d’Orange in the Dauphiné-to which<br /> BOOK AND PLAY TALK.<br /> and the Loire district excursions were organised<br /> -was terribly marred by an awful mistral that<br /> LITERARY concerns are for the moment in<br /> in August froze the spectators. Other excursions<br /> were to Chantilly and Pierrefonds, to Sèvres and<br /> 1 tbe background, like everything else that<br /> Versailles, so that the Congressites enjoyed much<br /> is not politics. But the General Election<br /> has drawn an unusual number of writers before<br /> hue<br /> refreshment after their polyglottic labours.<br /> Death has been terribly busy with the members<br /> The electors. Up to the time of writing, we<br /> of the bureau during the past two years, and since<br /> observe among the candidates for Parliamentary<br /> the Rome meeting two excellent confrères-<br /> honours Dr. Conan Doyle, Mr. Gilbert Parker,<br /> Mr. Henry Norman, Sir George Scott Robertson,<br /> Signors Bonfadini and Torelli-Viollier—have<br /> Mr. H. J. Mackinder, and Mr. Mullett Ellis.<br /> passed onward ; let me end with this word of<br /> homage to their memory.<br /> Mr. Anthony Hope Hawkins was among the<br /> number, but he has been obliged owing to sudden<br /> illness to withdraw the candidature he had<br /> contemplated.<br /> CORRESPONDENCE.<br /> Mr. Alexander Michie, the well-known authority<br /> on China, has written å life of Sir Rutherford<br /> A QUERY.<br /> Alcock, in which is narrated the progress made<br /> TF a man throws a thing away, to whom does it by Engli<br /> to whom does it.. by Englishmen in that country during the past<br /> j legally belong? Surely the finder. Following sixty years. The subject of the biography was,<br /> this reasoning, am I right in supposing that of course, at one time British Minister in Peking.<br /> if an author writes something and then throws it The third volume of Professor S. R. Gardiner&#039;s<br /> away, any person who happens to find it has a legal history of the Commonwealth and Protectorate<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 94 (#128) #############################################<br /> <br /> 94<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> may be looked for early next year. Mr. Morley&#039;s<br /> biography of Cromwell will be published by<br /> Messrs. Macmillan during the present month.<br /> Mr. H. J. Mackinder, who last year made the<br /> first ascent of Mount Kenya, narrates this<br /> remarkable achievement in a volume which Mr.<br /> Heinemann will publish shortly.<br /> The 23rd inst. is the date fixed for the produc-<br /> tion of Mr. Zapgwill&#039;s new novel, “ The Mantle<br /> of Elijah ” (Heinemann).<br /> Mr. Gilbert Parker&#039;s tales of Pontiac, entitled<br /> “ The Lane that Had no Turning,&quot; and Mrs.<br /> Steel&#039;s new novel, “ The Hosts of the Lord,” will<br /> be published about the middle of this month by<br /> Mr. Heinemann.<br /> A new story by Miss Carey, entitled “Rue with<br /> a Difference,” will be published on Oct. 2, and<br /> one by Miss Charlotte M. Yonge, entitled<br /> “Modern Broods,&quot; on Oct. 5, both by Messrs.<br /> Macmillan.<br /> A volume of stories by the Rev. W. J. Dawson<br /> is being published by Mr. Grant Richards under<br /> the title “ The Doctor Speaks.” ,<br /> A new edition of Mr. Whistler&#039;s “ The Gentle<br /> Art of Making Enemies” will be published<br /> shortly. The work has been out of print.<br /> A new work by Deas Cromarty, entitled “The<br /> Heart of Babylon,&quot; will be published shortly by<br /> Messrs. Horace Marshall and Son.<br /> The first volume of Professor Saintsbury&#039;s<br /> sbury&#039;s<br /> “ History of Criticism and Literary Taste from<br /> the Earliest Times to the Present Day” will be<br /> published shortly by Messrs. Blackwood.<br /> Mr Charles G. Harper has added to his series<br /> of books on our great highways two volumes on<br /> “ The Great North Road.” These will be pub.<br /> lished by Messrs. Chapman and Hall, and will<br /> contain numerous illustrations.<br /> Mr. Frank T. Bullen&#039;s work on “The Men of<br /> the Merchant Service” will be published on<br /> Oct. 10 by Messrs. Smith, Elder, and Co.<br /> : “ Webs of Mystery&quot; is the title of Mr. John<br /> G. Rowe&#039;s first book. It is a volume of detective<br /> stories, and is published by Messrs. Walter Scott<br /> Limited. The young author has also written a<br /> five-act drama, which is likely to be produced<br /> shortly by a well-known provincial actor-manager,<br /> and is at present busy revising his new novel<br /> “A King of Busbrangers,&quot; already published<br /> serially, for book form.<br /> Mr. Albert Lee, who wrote “ The Gentleman<br /> Pensioner,&quot; which was so successful in this<br /> country and in America, has just completed a new<br /> historical romance entitled “ The Emperor&#039;s<br /> Trumpeter,” dealing with the downfall of Robes-<br /> pierre and the military career of Bonaparte. It<br /> will first appear as a serial in the new volume of<br /> Young England.<br /> The following are among the forthcoming<br /> publications of Mr. John C. Nimmo: “The<br /> Amusements of Old London,&quot; in two volumes,<br /> being a survey of the sports and pastimes, tea<br /> gardens and parks, playhouses, and other diver-<br /> sions of the people of London from the 17th to the<br /> beginning of the 19th century, by W. B. Boulton ;<br /> « English Historical Memoirs is (1 volumes).<br /> by John Heneage Jesse; “ Reminiscences of a<br /> Falconer,&quot; by Major Charles Hawkins Fisher;<br /> and “A History of Steeplechasing,&quot; by William<br /> C. A. Blew, M.Ă.<br /> Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall, and Co. will publish<br /> Mr. C. H. Malcolm&#039;s new novel “Robert Kane&quot;<br /> about the second week of this month, at the<br /> published price of 38. 6d.<br /> Mr. Reynolds-Ball gives an account of his<br /> recent cycling experiences among the Piedmontese<br /> Alps in a long and admirably illustrated article<br /> in the September issue of the Cyclists&#039; Touring<br /> Club Gazette.<br /> The Oxford University Press, which is exhibit.<br /> ing in three different groups at the Paris Exhibi.<br /> tion, has gained the unique distinction of being<br /> awarded three Grands Prix-one each for higher<br /> education, book-binding, and Oxford India paper.<br /> Derek Vane&#039;s new novel, “ Ye shall be as<br /> Gods,&quot; will run as a serial in Great Thoughts,<br /> beginning in October, before heing published in<br /> volume form. It deals with a curious develop-<br /> ment of character in a woman who has elected to<br /> live apart from the world, and shows how a feeble<br /> nature may live on and absorb a strong one.<br /> Her Majesty the Queen has been graciously<br /> pleased to accept a copy of the new musical novel<br /> (published by Sands and Co.) entitled “A 439:<br /> being the Autobiography of a Piano,&quot; written<br /> gratuitously by “Twenty-five Musical Scribes.”<br /> The profits go entirely to the orphanage of the<br /> Incorporated Society of Musicians, which was<br /> founded at the time of Her Majesty&#039;s first jubilee.<br /> A letter, dated the 21st ult., from the private<br /> secretary, to the editor, Mr. Algernon Rose, says<br /> that “ The Queen desires her thanks to be<br /> returned for the book.”<br /> Mr. Isaac Henderson, author of the Criterion<br /> comedy entitled “The Silent Battle.&quot; has written<br /> a new play, called “The Mummy and the<br /> Humming Top,” for Mr. Wyndham. The first<br /> production at Wyndham&#039;s Theatre, however, will<br /> be the new play in four acts by Mr. Henry Arthur<br /> puuro Charles G. Hart highways two will be<br /> rhet uitously by &quot;ography of a entitled &quot;A 430<br /> --<br /> --<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 95 (#129) #############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 95<br /> or<br /> especial benefit to conductors, and secretaries of<br /> provincial musical societies desiring information<br /> concerning suitable orchestral works by British<br /> composers, or information regarding British<br /> soloists and players generally.<br /> BOOKS AND REVIEWS.<br /> (In these columns notes on books are given from reviews<br /> which carry weight, and are not, 80 far as can be learned,<br /> logrollers.)<br /> Jones, in which Mr. Wyndham (in the part of an<br /> eminent lawyer), Miss Lena Ashwell, and Miss<br /> Mary Moore will appear.<br /> Mr. Haddon Chambers has written a new play<br /> for Mr. Alexander.<br /> In Mr. Tree&#039;s production at Her Majesty&#039;s of<br /> “Herod the Great,” Mr. Stephen Phillips&#039;s poetic<br /> drama, the following will be in the cast : Miss<br /> Maud Jeffries, Mrs. Crowe, Miss Calhoun, Mr.<br /> C. W. Somerset, and Mr. King Hedley.<br /> Mrs. Patrick Campbell will reopen the Royalty<br /> Theatre on Oct. 8.<br /> Mr. Jobn Farrington and Mr. A. H. Canby will<br /> reopen Terry&#039;s Theatre in a few days with the<br /> play by Charles H. Hoyt, entitled “A Parlour<br /> Match.&quot;<br /> Among the new plays in London during<br /> September were “The Scarlet Sin,” by Mr.<br /> George R. Sims and Mr. Arthur Shirley, at the<br /> Crown, Peckham; “ Self and Lady,” by M. Pierre<br /> Decourcelle, at the Vaudeville ; “The Price of<br /> Peace,&quot; by Mr. Cecil Raleigh, at Drury Lane;<br /> and Mr. Barrie&#039;s “ The Wedding Guest” at the<br /> Garrick.<br /> The new play at the Lyceum by Mr. Seymour<br /> Hicks and Mr. F. Latham, which is to be pro-<br /> duced on Oct. 6, is called “For Auld Lang Syne.”<br /> Mr. William Mollison, Miss Lily Hanbury (as a<br /> hospital nurse), Miss Fanny Brough, Mr. W. L.<br /> Abingdon, and Mr. Leonard Boyne will play the<br /> principal parts.<br /> Mr. F. R. Benson&#039;s company will open its<br /> second season in London at the Comedy on<br /> Dec. 19. On three nights of each week the stage<br /> will be held by the German company, the Benson<br /> company occupying the remaining three nights<br /> and two matinées.<br /> Under the patronage of Her Royal Highness<br /> the Princess of Wales, the Westminster Orchestral<br /> Society is about to commence its sixteenth season.<br /> At the forthcoming orchestral concert, the pro-<br /> gramme will, as usual, include several new works<br /> of interest by British composers. In response to<br /> the wish of many music lovers resident in the<br /> country to assist in the patriotic and valuable<br /> work the society has so long carried forward,<br /> the committee have decided to enrol a limited<br /> number of country members at a nominal fee of<br /> half a guinea a year, in return for which sub-<br /> scription such members are entitled to receive<br /> the society&#039;s i ublications, and, when visiting<br /> London, the privileges of one-guinea members.<br /> Applications should be addressed to the hon.<br /> secretary, Mr. Algernon Rose, Town Hall, West-<br /> minster. Such membership should be found of<br /> AN INTRODUCTION TO ENGLISH POLITICS, by John M.<br /> Robertson (Richards, 108. 6d.) is, says the Times, “ an ambi.<br /> tious, and it is fair to add, a clever book.” The Daily<br /> News begins by describing it as &quot;a very eloquent, striking,<br /> powerful, but not convincing book,&quot; and concludes by saying<br /> that“ the English politics to which Mr. Robertson&#039;s long,<br /> depressing survey is an Introduction are not those of bound.<br /> less hope in the future, as all true Liberal politics must be,<br /> but are much more like the politics of oynical disbelief in<br /> the wisdom which guides mankind.”<br /> PRINCE CHARLES EDWARD, by Andrew Lang (Goupil,<br /> 638. net), is &quot;an admirable piece of work,” says the Times,<br /> and “ a real contribution to historical knowledge.” For the<br /> first time the Stuart papers at Windsor Castle have been<br /> thoroughly examined, and they form the basis of the<br /> volume. Mr. Lang, says the Spectator, “has never been<br /> more happily inspired than in this study of the broken life-<br /> story of one who will always be a premier figure in romance<br /> -the last conspicuous prince of an ill-fated house and the<br /> centre of a movement wbich he did not comprehend. He<br /> has given as the severe truth, leaving no source unsearched.<br /> to find the facts of a difficult career, and at the same time-<br /> he has invested the whole narrativa, splendid and sordid,<br /> with an unreal fairy-tale atmosphere, which is the true one.&quot;<br /> The Daily Chronicle refera to the account of the little-<br /> known engagement at Falkirk &quot; as “an excellent example of<br /> Mr. Lang&#039;s descriptive style.&quot;<br /> THROUGH THE FIRST ANTARCTIC NIGHT, by Frederick.<br /> A. Cook, MD. (Heinemann, 208.), gives, says Literature,<br /> “a striking and graphic account of the voyage of the<br /> Belgica. The book, in fact, strikes us as a work of greater<br /> merit than the expedition itself, which seems, if we correctly<br /> anderstand Dr. Cook, to have been led in a rather a muddle..<br /> beaded manner.” “His book is interesting as, to use his<br /> own words, &#039; a contribution of new human experience in a.<br /> new inhuman world of ice.&#039; ... As a rule there is a<br /> certain air of jollity in the stories of those who have<br /> wintered in the regions of ice and darkness. It is otherwise<br /> with Dr. Cook and his companions. Even Ovid in his exile<br /> on the shores of the inhospitable Euxine was not so sorry<br /> for himself as they were.” The Times points out that the<br /> expedition, which was of Belgian origin, was the first that<br /> over wintered in the South Polar area. One fourth of Dr.<br /> Cook&#039;s narrative relates to South America.<br /> HAMPSHIRE, WITH THE ISLE OF WIGHT, by George A. B.<br /> Dewar (Dent, 48. 6d. net), is bighly praised by the Daily.<br /> Chronicle, which anticipates that the reader&#039;s verdict will<br /> be: “Never had I believed Hampshire so interesting.”<br /> Besides Mr. De war, five other writers, specialists in botany,<br /> entomology, geology, &amp;c., take charge of these departments.<br /> “The writers&#039; main business,&quot; says the Times,“ has been to<br /> describe towns, villages, the historic houses, and the roads,<br /> and the way in which they have done it should set an<br /> example to those who will undertake the other volumes ” of<br /> this series of county histories.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 96 (#130) #############################################<br /> <br /> 96<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> THE WHISTLING Maid, by Ernest Rhys (Hutobinson,<br /> 68.), “sets forth with real charm of expression and an<br /> unfailing sense of the picturesque,&quot; says the Spectator,<br /> &quot;the adventures on field and flood of a young Welsh damsel<br /> of high degree.” The Daily Chronicle characterises it as<br /> genuine romance—&quot;a romance written, not from the point<br /> of view of the chap-book and the county bistory, but as a<br /> the result of a true and sensitive romantic spirit, a work, in<br /> a word, of spontaneous and sincere artistry.&quot; Similarly the<br /> Literary World, which adds: “There is no more charming<br /> creation in modern literature than the heroine, Luned, the<br /> maid of the silver pipe, who leaves ber bome wben the raid<br /> is made upon it, and, attired in boy&#039;s clothing, rides<br /> through trackless forest country to find ber father, and<br /> bring him to the rescue.&quot;<br /> SENATOR NORTH, by Gertrude Atherton (Lane, 68.), is<br /> &quot;essentially an American story,&quot; says tbe Daily News.<br /> “It deals with the political and social life of Washington.”<br /> There is in the story a &quot;terrible tragedy that shows how<br /> beavy lies the shadow of the curse apon the blacks in the<br /> Southern States. Mrs. Atherton&#039;s pages are crowded<br /> with portraits of men and women in various grades of<br /> society. These portraits are very clean cut.” The Spectator<br /> says that “Mrs. Atherton&#039;s portrait of the beautiful bat<br /> unbappy balf-breed, with her abiding melancholy, her social<br /> ambitions, her strange lapses into vulgar barbarism, and<br /> her fatal mendacity, is of painfully engrossing interest.&quot;<br /> “She writes of humanity,” says the Daily Telegraph, “but<br /> it is of humanity at its best, and sbe has achieved å very<br /> great and noticeable success;&quot; and the Daily Chronicle<br /> describes the work as “ full of intellect, of character, and of<br /> movement.&quot;<br /> THE MAN THAT CORRUPTED HADLEYBURG, by Mark<br /> Twain (Chatto, 68.), contains, says the Spectator, &quot; a quantity<br /> of excellent mixed reading.&quot; &quot;Whatever the theme or its<br /> treatment, it is good to notice that there is not the slightest<br /> trace of fatigue in the mind of the writer.” “The whole,&quot;<br /> says the Daily News, “forms a welcome addition to the<br /> light literature of the day.” For there are all sorts of<br /> things in the book, echoes of Austrian Parliamente, of the<br /> Dreyfus case, of the author&#039;s experiences in the American<br /> Civil War, of Christian science, and a score of other<br /> subjects. The story that gives the title to the volume<br /> (“ only Mark Twain could have conceived the idea,&quot; says<br /> the Daily Telegraph) is described in the Literary World as<br /> *• a satire of the biting kind.” Of the book as a whole,<br /> the Daily Chronicle says : “ The old friend is here in the<br /> old familiar spirit, excellent company, perennially youthful.”<br /> SONS OF THE MORNING, by Eden Phillpotts (Methuen,<br /> 68.), is described by the Daily Chronicle as “excellent<br /> fiction.” The idea and central thread of the story (which<br /> is laid in Devonshire) is &quot;&amp; sweet and strong young<br /> farnieress, in love with two good men at once-a situation<br /> 80 frequent with women in real life, so rarely handled in<br /> books.&quot; &quot;The courting of Henery Collins has some excellent<br /> humour in it”; and the depths of the book &quot;are concerned<br /> with the most fascinating subject, witchcraft.” The work<br /> is described by the Spectator as “ earnest in aim and careful<br /> in workmanship.”<br /> The Fourth GENERATION, by Sir Walter Besant<br /> (Chatto, 68.), is a story of the present day, and “touches<br /> the old problem of beredity; but it faces that problem,&quot;<br /> says Literature, “ in the spirit of the practical man of the<br /> world.” The conseqaences of the crime of an ancestor of<br /> Leonard Campaigne,&quot; and the fortunes of his descendants<br /> as they touch the life of Leonard, are described and followed<br /> with all the skill of a master in the art of story-telling, ap<br /> to the moment when the stain is wiped out, and the<br /> momentam, as it were, of the crime exhausted, by the<br /> marriage of the descendant of the morderer to the descen.<br /> dant of his victim.” “The story is finely proportioned,”<br /> says the Daily News; &quot; its action never flags.&quot; “ Charac-<br /> ters are sharply drawn,” says the World, “and treated,<br /> too, with a pleasant, whimsical humour.”<br /> THE SOFT SIDE, by Henry James (Methaen, 68.), con.<br /> tains twelve studies, which, rays Literature, “will probably<br /> make new converts to his cult. Each story possesses to a<br /> high degree the sensitiveness and detachment which one<br /> generally finds in his works.” “How restful,” says the<br /> Daily Chronicle,&quot; the sense of being in the best circle&#039; all<br /> the time.&quot; The Spectator allows that “as a virtuoso of<br /> transcendental morbidity Mr. James claims anstinted<br /> admiration.&quot;<br /> THE GATELESS BARRIER, by Lucas Malet (Methuen, 68.),<br /> is described by tbe Daily News as a “boaatifal and eerie<br /> story.” “Lucas Malet has never done as a bit of artistic<br /> work anything more refined and delicate.&quot; It is the story<br /> of the love of a living man for a lovely ghost. It is told,<br /> says the Times, &quot;with a sense of style and a dramatic<br /> vigoar that make it a pleasure to read.” “The novel carries<br /> you along easily, naturally, spontaneously,&quot; says the Daily<br /> Telegraph, “because of its lightness of touch, its quaint<br /> vraisemblance, its original handling of familiar themes.”<br /> “Genuine imagination and charm have been at work here,”<br /> says the Daily Chronicle.<br /> THE Mystic NUMBER 7, by Annabel Gray (Simpkin,<br /> Marshall, 38. 6d.), &quot;shows keen psychological interest and<br /> ability,&quot; in the opinion of the Glasgow Herald. Lilera-<br /> ture says “Miss Annabel Gray has a good grip upon<br /> ber subject, and writes in a fashion that should be popular<br /> with the readers of her many other books.&quot; The West-<br /> minster Gazette says &quot;the sensational interest of the story<br /> is kept ap to the very end,&quot; while the Dundee Advertiser<br /> pronounces Glen Daile &quot;a splendid creation.”<br /> A MASTER OF CRAFT, by W. W. Jacobs (Metbuen, 68.),<br /> his first full-length story, “ can be anreservedly recom-<br /> mended,” says the Spectator, &quot; to all who have not lost their<br /> appetite for wholesome food for laughter.” “The scene is<br /> as usual laid on a small coasting schooner, or in the various<br /> baunts or houses of call of those engaged in this trade, and<br /> the motive is, not for the first time, furnished by the amorous<br /> susceptibilities of an amiable but singularly indiscreet<br /> skipper.”<br /> A PRIEST&#039;S POEMs, by K. D. B. (Catholic Truth Society),<br /> is a collection of various verses arranged in different parts.<br /> The Athenæum says: “It is in the impassioned prayer to<br /> &#039;God, Creator of the Waters,&#039; in &#039;Ecce Sto ad Ostium,&#039; in the<br /> long and at times beautiful poem Secrets of the Night&#039; that<br /> we recogpise now and again a strain of true poetry, while<br /> the translations have the rare merit of almost persuading<br /> the reader that they are original.” The Westminster<br /> Gazette says that “the author shows genuine poetic fancy<br /> and devotional spirit.”<br /> 66<br /> “THE<br /> AUTHOR.<br /> SCALE FOR ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> 0<br /> Front Page<br /> ... ... £4 0 0<br /> Other Pages<br /> ... ... 3 00<br /> Hall of a Page ...<br /> ... ... 1 10 0<br /> Quarter of a Page<br /> Eighth of a Page<br /> Single Column Advertisements<br /> ...<br /> 0 16<br /> per inch 0 6 0<br /> Bills for Insertion ... ... ... ... ... per 2000 3 0 0<br /> Reductions made for a Series of six or Twelve Insertions.<br /> All letters respecting Advertisements should be addressed to the<br /> ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER, The Author Otice, 4, Portugal-street<br /> London, W.O.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 96 (#131) #############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> SALE OF MSS. 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336https://historysoa.com/items/show/336The Author, Vol. 11 Issue 06 (November 1900)<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=49&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=%3Cem%3EThe+Author%3C%2Fem%3E%2C+Vol.+11+Issue+06+%28November+1900%29"><em>The Author</em>, Vol. 11 Issue 06 (November 1900)</a><a href="https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390" target="_blank" rel="noopener">https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=51&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=Publication">Publication</a>1900-11-01-The-Author-11-6<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=76&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=1900-11-01">1900-11-01</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=89&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=11">11</a>697–11219001101The Author.<br /> (The Organ of the Incorporated Society of Authors. Monthly.)<br /> CONDUCTED BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> Vol. XI.—No. 6.]<br /> NOVEMBER 1, 1900.<br /> [PRICE SIXPENCE.<br /> CONTENTS.<br /> Memoranda ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...<br /> Literary Property<br /> 1. An Example of Commission Publishing<br /> 2. A Dramatist on the Copyright Bill<br /> 3. The Sixpenny Book ... ... ...<br /> 4. Canadian Oopyright Act ... ,<br /> The Pension Fund of the Incorporated Society of Authors...<br /> Paris Letter. By Darracotte Scott<br /> PAGE<br /> Notes and News. By the Editor... ... ... ... ... ... 105<br /> The Four Winds ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 107<br /> Correspondence-1. Live and Let Live,&quot; 2. What is a Fair<br /> Price? 3. &quot;Young&quot; Fiction Writers and the War Fund.<br /> 4. Fact versus Fiction. 5. For Nothing<br /> 18 &quot;&quot;* ... ... ... 107<br /> Book and Play Talk... ...<br /> ... ... 108<br /> Books and Reviews ... .<br /> ... ... ... 111<br /> 103<br /> PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOCIETY.<br /> 95, Nu<br /> 1. 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The Addenda to the &quot;Methods of Publishing.&quot; By G. HERBERT THRING. Being additional<br /> facts collected at the office of the Society since the publication of the “ Methods.&quot; With<br /> comments and advice. 28.<br /> 11. Forms of Agreement issued by the Publishers&#039; Association; with Comments. By G Herbert<br /> THRING, and Illustrative Examples by Sir WALTER BESANT. 18.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 96 (#134) #############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> The Society of Authors (Incorporated).<br /> PRESIDENT.<br /> GEORGE MEREDITH.<br /> COUNCIL.<br /> SIR EDWIN ARNOLD, K.C.I.E., C.S.I. AUSTIN DOBSON.<br /> SIR LEWIS MORRIS.<br /> J. M. BARRIE.<br /> A. CONAN DOYLE, M.D.<br /> HENRY NORMAN, M.P.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> A. W. DUBOURG.<br /> Miss E. A. ORMEROD, LL D.<br /> ROBERT BATEMAN.<br /> SIR MICHAEL FOSTER, K.C.B., F.R.S. GILBERT PARKER, M.P.<br /> F. E. BEDDARD, F.R.S.<br /> D. W. FRESHFIELD.<br /> J. C. 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Bd.<br /> PATERSON&#039;S PRACTICAL STATUTES 1900<br /> (63 &amp; 64 VICTORIA);<br /> WITH INTRODUCTIONS, NOTES, TABLES OF STATUTES REPEALED AND SUBJECTS ALTERED, LISTS<br /> OF LOCAL AND PERSONAL AND PRIVATE ACTS, AND A COPIOUS INDEX.<br /> EDITED BY<br /> JAMES SUTHERLAND COTTON, Barrister -at - Law.<br /> CON L&#039;ENTS.<br /> Table of Principal Enactments repealed. CAP.<br /> CAP<br /> Table of Principal Subjects altered.<br /> 19. Land Registry (New Buildings) Act [title 40. Elementary School Teachers Superannua-<br /> only)<br /> tion (Jersey) Act [title only]<br /> CAP.<br /> SESRION 1899–63 VICTORIA, 20. Ecclesiastical Assessments (Scotland) Act 41. Local Government (Ireland) (No. 2) Act<br /> 1. Appropriation Act 1899. Session 2 [title only).<br /> tille only).<br /> [title only).<br /> 2. Treasury Bills Act (title only)<br /> 1. Mines (Prohibition of Child Labour Under 42. Reserve Forces Act.<br /> 3. Second Session (Explodation) Act.<br /> ground) Act.<br /> 43. Intermediate Education (Ireland) Act<br /> 22. Workmen&#039;s Compensation Act.<br /> [title only).<br /> SESSION 1900-63 &amp; 64 VICT.<br /> 23. Poor Removal Act.<br /> 44. Exportation of Arms Act<br /> 1. Consolidated Fund (No. 1) Act ſtille only). 4. Veterinary Surgeons Amendment Act. 45. Poor Relief (Ireland) Act ſtille only].<br /> 2. War Loan Act (title only).<br /> 25. Charitablo Loan Societies (Ireland) Act 46. Members of Local Authorities Relief Act.<br /> 3. Consolidated Fund (No. 2) Act [title only). [title only<br /> 47. County Courts (Investment) Act.<br /> 4. Census (Great Britain) Act.<br /> 26. Land Oharges Act.<br /> 48. Companies Act.<br /> 5. Army (Annual) Act.<br /> 27. Railway Employment (Prevention of 49. Town Councils (Scotland) Act [title only).<br /> 6. Census (Ireland) Act [title only].<br /> Accidents) Act.<br /> 50. Agricultural Holdings Act.<br /> 7. Finance Act.<br /> 28. Inebriates Amendment (Scotland) Act | 51. Money. lenders Act.<br /> 8. 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Supplways (Irel Working<br /> In demy 8vo., 700 pages, price 7s. 6d., the Fourth Edition of<br /> AN ANECDOTAL HISTORY<br /> THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT,<br /> FROM THE<br /> EARLIEST PERIODS TO THE PRESENT TIME.<br /> WITH<br /> NOTICES OF EMINENT PARLIAMENTARY MEN, AND EXAMPLES OF THEIR ORATORY.<br /> COMPILED FROM AUTHENTIO SOURCES BY<br /> GEORGE HENRY JENNINGS.<br /> - - - -<br /> CONTENTS :<br /> PABT I-Rise and Progress of Parliamentary Institutions.<br /> APPENDIX.-(A) Lists of the Parliaments of England and of the<br /> PART II.- Personal Anecdotes : Sir Thomas More to John Morley.<br /> United Kingdom.<br /> PABT III.-Miscellaneons: 1. Elections. 2. Privilege; Exclusion of<br /> (B) Speakers of the House of Commons.<br /> Strangers; Publication of Debates. 3. Parliamentary<br /> (O) Prime Ministers. Lord Chancellors, and Secretaries<br /> Usages, &amp;c. 4. Varieties.<br /> of State from 1715 to 1892.<br /> HORACE Cox, “LAW TIMES” OFFICE, WINDSOR HOUSE, BREAM&#039;S BUILDINGS, E.C.<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> N<br /> 2<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 96 (#136) #############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> A Fascinating Novel of Religious Life by a New Writer.<br /> THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF ALLEN LORNE. By ALEXANDER MACDOUGALL Cloth, 6s.<br /> SOME EARLY REVIEWS:_The book is worthy of all who are interested in the progress of religious thought.&quot;-Scotsman. &quot;The<br /> author knows clearly what he is writing about, and his glimpses of old Glasgow, of Argyleshire of London, and of Sussex are excellently<br /> done, and the people have qualities of real interest.&quot;-Christian Leader. Å vigorous picture of the most characteristic phase of Scottish<br /> life.<br /> The writing is distinctly good, and the book will commend itself to those who like a clever mixture of love and theology.&quot;-<br /> Susset Daily Veros. &quot;A novel of considerable power, and one that thoughtful readers will enjoy.&quot;.. Birmingham Daily Gazette.<br /> London: T. FISHER UNWIN, Paternoster Square, E.C.<br /> THE MOST MAGNIFICENT AND COMPREHENSIVE BOOK OF THE PERIOD.<br /> SOCIAL QUESTIONS AND NATIONAL PROBLEMS: EVILS AND REMEDIES.<br /> Second Edition, about 500 pages, 8vo., 58. 3d. post free, strongly bound in cloth.<br /> Two Books each to the first Twenty Subscribers. Carte-de-visites copied, 28. 6d. hall dozen; 49. 6d. dozen. Enlarged to Cabinet size, 3s. 6d.<br /> and 68. 6d., to subscribers only. Lecturers, &amp;c., privileges. Special Terms. Will be ready about New Year. Address-<br /> J. W. 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LELY, M.A., Barrister-at-Law.<br /> TABLE OF CONTENTS.<br /> CHAPTER 1.-Pre-Reformation Law.<br /> CHAPTER V.-The Benefices Act.<br /> II.—Reformation Law, except the first three I<br /> VI.—Table of principal Statutes repealed and<br /> Acts of Uniformity.<br /> unrepealed.<br /> III.-The Acts of Uniformity.<br /> » VII.—Table of principal Judicial Decisions.<br /> IV.—The Prayer Book and Rubrics.<br /> APPENDIX.-Ecclesiastical Bills—Comprehension Bill of 1689. Ecclesiastical Appeals Bill 1850. Church Discipline<br /> Bill of 1899. Statements by English Church Union and Church Association. Extracts from Decrees and<br /> Canons of Council of Trent. The Creed of Pope Pius the Fourth as added to by Pope Pius the Ninth.<br /> And a Copious Index.<br /> LONDON: HORACE cox WINDSOR HOUSE, BREAM’S BUILDINGS, E.C.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 97 (#137) #############################################<br /> <br /> The Author.<br /> (The Organ of the Incorporated Society of Authors. Monthly.)<br /> CONDUCTED BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> VOL. XI.-No. 6.]<br /> VOL. XL_NO.6.]<br /> NOVEMBER I, 1900.<br /> [PRICE SIXPENCE.<br /> For the Opinions expressed in papers that are<br /> signed or initialled the Authors alone are<br /> responsible. None of the papers or para-<br /> graphs must be taken as expressing the<br /> collective opinions of the Committee unless<br /> they are officially signed by G. Herbert<br /> Thring, Sec.<br /> M HE Secretary of the Society begs to give notice that all<br /> I remittances are acknowledged by return of post, and<br /> requests that all members not receiving an answer to<br /> important communications within two days will write to him<br /> without delay. All remittances should be crossed Union<br /> Bank of London, Chancery-lane, or be sent by registered<br /> letter only.<br /> III. THE ROYALTY SYSTEM.<br /> It is above all things necessary to know what the<br /> proposed royalty means to both sides. It is now possible<br /> for an author to ascertain approximately and very nearly<br /> the truth. From time to time the very important figures<br /> connected with royalties are published in The Author.<br /> Readers can also work out the figures themselves from the<br /> “Cost of Production.”<br /> IV. A COMMISSION AGREEMENT.<br /> The main points are :<br /> (1.) Be careful to obtain a fair cost of production.<br /> (2.) Keep control of the advertisements.<br /> (3.) Keep control of the sale price of the book.<br /> GENERAL.<br /> All other forms of agreement are combinations of the four<br /> above mentioned.<br /> Such combinations are generally disastrous to the author.<br /> Never sign any agreement without competent advice from<br /> the Secretary of the Society.<br /> Stamp all agreements with the Inland Revenue stamp.<br /> Avoid agreements by letter if possible.<br /> The main points which the Society has always demanded<br /> from the outset are :<br /> (1.) That both sides shall know what an agreement<br /> means<br /> (2.) The inspection of those account books which belong<br /> to the author. We are advised that this is a right, in the<br /> nature of a common law right, which cannot be denied or<br /> withheld.<br /> Communications and letters are invited by the Editor on<br /> all subjects connected with literature, but on no other sab.<br /> jocts whatever. Articles which cannot be accepted are<br /> returned if stamps for the purpose accompany the MSS.<br /> GENERAL MEMORANDA.<br /> WARNINGS TO DRAMATIC AUTHORS.<br /> IT ERE are a few standing rules to be observed in an<br /> I agreement. There are four methods of dealing<br /> with literary property :<br /> I. THAT OF SELLING IT OUTRIGHT.<br /> This is in some respects the most satisfactory, if a proper<br /> price can be obtained. But the transaction should be<br /> managed by a competent agent, or with the advice of the<br /> Secretary of the Society.<br /> II. A PROFIT-SHARING AGREEMENT (a bad form of<br /> agreement).<br /> In this case the following rules should be attended to :<br /> (1.) Not to sign any agreement in which the cost of pro.<br /> duction forms a part without the strictest investigation.<br /> (2.) Not to give the publisher the power of putting the<br /> profits into his own pocket by charging for advertisements<br /> in his own organs : or by charging exchange advertise.<br /> ments. Therefore keep control of the advertisements.<br /> (3.) Not to allow a special charge for &quot; office expenses,”<br /> unless the same allowance is made to the author.<br /> (4.) Not to give up American, Colonial, or Continental<br /> rights.<br /> (5.) Not to give up serial or translation rights.<br /> (6.) Not to bind yourself for future work to any publisher.<br /> As well bind yourself for the future to any one solicitor or<br /> doctor!<br /> 1. N EVER sign an agreement without submitting it to<br /> the Secretary of the Society of Authors or some<br /> competent legal authority.<br /> 2. It is well to be extremely careful in negotiating for<br /> the production of a play with anyone except an established<br /> manager.<br /> 3. There are three forms of dramatic contract for PLAYS<br /> IN THREE OR MORE ACTS :-<br /> (a.) SALE OUTRIGHT OF THE PERFORMING RIGHT,<br /> This is unsatisfactory. An author who enters<br /> into such a contract should stipulate in the con-<br /> tract for production of the piece by a certain date<br /> and for proper publication of his name on the<br /> play-bills.<br /> (6.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF PERCENTAGES<br /> on gross receipts. Peroentages vary between<br /> 5 and 15 per cent. An anthor should obtain a<br /> percentage on the sliding scale of gross receipts<br /> in preference to the American system. Should<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 98 (#138) #############################################<br /> <br /> 98<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> IL<br /> obtain a sum in advance of percentages. A fixed reaping no benefit to yourself, and that you are advancing<br /> date on or before which the play should be the best interests of literature in promoting the indepen.<br /> performed.<br /> dence of the writer.<br /> (c.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE 6. The Committee have now arranged for the reception of<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF ROYALTIES (i.e., members&#039; agreements and their preservation in a fireproof<br /> fixed nightly fees). This method should be safe. The agreements will, of course, be regarded as con-<br /> always avoided except in cases where the fees fidential documents to be read only by the Secretary, who<br /> are likely to be small or difficult to collect. The will keep the key of the safe. The Society now offers :-(1)<br /> other safeguards set out under heading (6.) apply To read and advise upon agreements and publishers. (2) To<br /> also in this case.<br /> stamp agreements in readiness for a possible action upon<br /> 4. PLAYS IN ONE ACT are often sold outright, but it is them. (3) To keep agreements. (4) To enforce payments<br /> better to obtain a small nightly fee if possible, and a sum due according to agreements.<br /> paid in advance of such fees in any event. It is extremely<br /> important that the amateur rights of one act plays should<br /> be reserved.<br /> 5. Authors shonld remember that performing rights can<br /> THE READING BRANCH.<br /> be limited, and are usually limited by town, country, and<br /> time. This is most important.<br /> M EMBERS will greatly assist the Society in this<br /> 6. Authors should not assign performing rights, but<br /> branch of their work by informing young writers of<br /> should grant a licence to perform. The legal distinction is<br /> its existence. Their MSS. can be read and treated<br /> of great importance.<br /> as a composition is treated by a coach. The term MSS.<br /> 7. Authors should remember that performing rights in a includes not only works of fiction but poetry and dramatic<br /> play are distinct from literary copyright. A manager works, and when it is possible, under special arrangement,<br /> holding the performing right or licence to perform cannot<br /> technical and scientific works. The Readers are writers of<br /> print the book of the words.<br /> competence and experience. The fee is one guinea.<br /> 8. Never forget that American rights may be exceedingly<br /> valuable. They should never be included in English<br /> agreements without the author obtaining a substantial<br /> consideration.<br /> 9. Agreements for collaboration should be carefully<br /> NOTICES.<br /> drawn and executed before collaboration is commenced.<br /> 10. An author should remember that production of a play<br /> M HE Editor of The Author begs to remind members of the<br /> is highly speculative: that he runs a very great risk of<br /> 1 Society that, although the paper is sent to them free<br /> delay and a breakdown in the fulfilment of his contract.<br /> of charge, the cost of producing it would be a very<br /> He should therefore guard himself all the more carefully in<br /> heavy charge on the resources of the Society if a great<br /> the beginning<br /> many members did not forward to the Secretary the modest<br /> 11. An author must remember that the dramatic market<br /> 68. 6d. subscription for the year.<br /> is exceedingly limited, and that for a novice the first object<br /> Communications for The Author should be addressed to<br /> is to obtain adequate publication.<br /> the Offices of the Society, 4, Portugal-street, Lincoln’s-inn.<br /> As these warnings must necessarily be incomplete on<br /> Fields, W.C., and should reach the Editor not later than the<br /> account of the wide range of the subject of dramatic con.<br /> 21st of each month.<br /> tracts, those authors desirous of further information are<br /> All persons engaged in literary work of any kind, whether<br /> referred to the Secretary of the Society.<br /> members of the Society or not, are invited to communicate<br /> to the Editor any points connected with their work which<br /> it would be advisable in the general interest to publish.<br /> The present location of the Authors&#039; Club is at 3, White-<br /> HOW TO USE THE SOCIETY.<br /> hall-court, Charing Cross. Address the Secretary for<br /> information, rules of admission, &amp;c.<br /> VVERY member has a right to ask for and to receive<br /> advice upon his agreements, his choice of a pub.<br /> lisher, or any dispute arising in the conduct of his<br /> LITERARY PROPERTY.<br /> business or the administration of his property. If the<br /> advice sought is such as can be given best by a solici.<br /> tor. the member has a right to an opinion &#039;from the 1.-AN EXAMPLE OF COMMISSION PUBLISHING.<br /> Society&#039;s solicitors. If the case is such that Counsel&#039;s I beg to place the following facts and figures at your<br /> opinion is desirable, the Committee will obtain for him · disposal :-<br /> Counsel&#039;s opinion. All this without any cost to the member. A London publisher offered to produce the inclosed work,<br /> 2. Remember that questions connected with copyright “with stiff paper cover,&quot; at £15 for 1000 copies, or £13 108.<br /> and publisher&#039;s agreoments do not generally fall within the for 500 copies.<br /> experience of ordinary solicitors. Therefore, do not scruple Another London publisher offered to produce 1000 copies,<br /> to use the Society<br /> also with stiff paper cover, for £12 108.<br /> 3. Send to the Office copies of past agreements and past I have had 1000 copies printed, as you see, without the<br /> accounts with the loan of the books represented. The stiff cover, for £3 38. by a country printer whose name is on<br /> Secretary will always be glad to have any agreements, new the pamphlet.<br /> G. B.<br /> or old, for inspection and note. The information thus To the Secretary of the Authors&#039; Society.<br /> obtained may prove invaluable.<br /> T INVITE very special attention to the above<br /> 4. Before signing any agreement whatever, send the pro-<br /> 1 letter. Observe that the actual cost of the<br /> posed document to the Society for examination.<br /> 5. Remember always that in belonging to the Society you<br /> pamphlet was £3 38. It is a brochure of<br /> are fighting the battles of other writers, even if you are 20pp. in long primer, a full page of about 600<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 99 (#139) #############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 99<br /> words. One publisher offered to produce it, on for advertising as the author or proprietor shall<br /> commission, for £15: another for £12 10s., both deem desirable.”<br /> offering a “ stiff paper cover.”<br /> An important point in this clause has been<br /> The author bad it printed, as he says, for £3 38., overlooked in the Society&#039;s comments. It is this.<br /> but without the stiff paper cover. The name of The publisher claims a percentage on all “dis-<br /> the printing firm is given on the inside of the bursements,” and, in the very next clause, declares<br /> title page. A note is made of the firm for future that he will disburse nothing! In that case what<br /> use.<br /> claim has he for any percentage ?<br /> Let us put down the paper cover at £1. The Another point. In going to a publisher, the<br /> proposals then mean that a pamphlet costing author naturally expects the whole machinery of<br /> £3 38. is to be charged at £14 or at £u 108. his office, together with his skill and experience,<br /> It may be urged that every tradesman has a to be placed at the service of his book. The most<br /> right to put any price he pleases on his own important part, perhaps, is the knowledge when<br /> wares. So he has, provided he does not deceive to advertise and to what extent. The publishers<br /> his customers. Now, when an author goes to a refuse any help. They say, “ Such a sum as the<br /> publisher he accepts his statement about the cost author or proprietor may deem desirable.” Nothing<br /> of printing and paper as an honest statement. is more undesirable to a general publisher than<br /> It is not enough, as some publishers do, to say the success of a commission book, because if it<br /> &quot;our charge” is so and so, because the author, should succeed the bulk of the profit goes to the<br /> even if he allows the publisher some profit-which author-a thing by no means in their interests.<br /> ought to be plainly and honestly stated-does not This should be thoroughly understood. What<br /> imagine that the profit is to be three, four, or five they prefer is a so-called “ half-profit” system, the<br /> times the actual cost.<br /> very name of which now stinks, or a “ deferred<br /> That the publishers in question venture to royalty ” with a large margin before it begins-a<br /> make this exorbitant profit is probably due to the method the reek and stench of which is fast be-<br /> baleful influence of the “ Publishers&#039; Form of coming a rival even to that of the “ half-profit.”<br /> Agreement.” What is the clause regulating this<br /> W. B.<br /> assumed right of overcharge? “The publisher<br /> will supply the author with estimates for the II.-A DRAMATIST ON THE COPYRIGHT BILL.<br /> printing and will charge a commission of per “Lord Monkswell&#039;s Copyright Bill from the<br /> cent. on the trade prices for printing, paper, point of view of a playwright?” Well, it is not<br /> binding, advertising, and other disbursements, conceived from that point of view; it is con-<br /> and reserve to himself the right to take the ceived from the point of view of authors who are<br /> usual credit or the equivalent cash discount for not playwrights. To the novelist it affords a<br /> cash payments, but no such discount shall exceed protection which he does not at present possess,<br /> 7) per cent.&quot;<br /> and to which he is entitled; and in that respect<br /> All that we can say in this case is that the is a righteous and beneficent measure. On the<br /> pnblishers, with this clause to guide them, playwright, beyond the extension of the term of<br /> interpreted the percentage allowed in a large and his protection, it confers, to the best of my judg-<br /> liberal spirit. They merely said, “ We will make ment, no benefit whatever.<br /> it 300 or 400 per cent.&quot;<br /> First, as regards the duration of the “per-<br /> It is not often that we find the publishers&#039; forming right,” which playwrights call “stage-<br /> agreements “equitable&quot; reduced to so delightful right,” and thereby save two syllables, I think<br /> an absurdity as this. Meantime, the Society&#039;s that is sufficient. It is sometimes argued that<br /> exposure of those firms, with comments, has now stage-right should descend to a playwright&#039;s<br /> gone into a second edition. Members of the representatives in perpetuity. I quite agree<br /> Society will do good service by sending copies to that both copyright and stage-right should be<br /> those of their friends who are concerned with perpetual; but in my view, after a certain period,<br /> literary property.<br /> they should become the property of the State.<br /> I would next call attention to the clause which There is no such person as an absolutely original<br /> follows the one already quoted. You observe author; the most nearly original author draws<br /> that the publisher demands a blank percentage bis inspiration from his experience, his reading,<br /> on all “ disbursements.”<br /> his observation, his environment. The com-<br /> Now read the next clause.<br /> munity is part author of everything. By limiting<br /> “The author or proprietor shall, before the the period of protection, the community comes<br /> work is sent to press, pay the publisher a suffi- into its rights, but not, I submit, in the right<br /> cient sum to meet the estimated charges for way. Why should a manager be able to play<br /> production and publication, including such a sum Shakespeare for nothing, and so accustom hiuiself<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 100 (#140) ############################################<br /> <br /> 100<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> If a man writes and publishes a play, pre-<br /> sumably he means it to be acted for the benefit<br /> of himself and his assigns; and to say so on the<br /> title-page is superfluous. It might even be<br /> argued that section 7 is retrospective.<br /> The injustice arises through the lumping<br /> together of playwrights with librettists, com-<br /> posers, and vocalists, whose interests are in some<br /> respects diametrically opposite. If the Bill<br /> created in every literary work other than a<br /> libretto two inherent rights, copyright and stage-<br /> right, which not only might but must be assigned<br /> separately, everybody would be protected, and<br /> nobody would be troubled. As the Bill stands I<br /> am compelled to the conclusion that (apart from<br /> the duration of protection) it weakens the present<br /> position of the playwright and strengthens that<br /> of the pirate.<br /> SYDNEY GRUNDY.<br /> to the nefarious practice of evading author&#039;s<br /> fees? He ought to pay fees to the State. So<br /> far as the author&#039;s representatives are concerned,<br /> Lord Monkswell&#039;s term of thirty complete years<br /> after death seems reasonable.<br /> I am afraid this is all that can be said in<br /> favour of the Bill from a playwright&#039;s point of<br /> view.<br /> Clause 5, section 5, revives the ancient formula<br /> that “performing right shall not subsist in any<br /> profane, indecent, seditious, or libellous dramatic<br /> or musical work.” So that a thief has only to<br /> add profanity, indecency, sedition, or libel to his<br /> theft to be exempted from the penalty of his dis-<br /> honesty. It seems scarcely a benefit to public<br /> morals that protection should be extended to<br /> unauthorised performances of profane, indecent,<br /> seditious, and libellous works. Sections 6 and 7<br /> of the same clause proceed to strew the path of<br /> the pirate with roses.<br /> (6) Where a dramatic or musical work is published as a<br /> book, and it is intended that the performing right should be<br /> reserved, the owner of the copyright, whether he has parted<br /> with the performing right or not, shall cause notice of such<br /> reservation to be printed on the title page or in a con.<br /> spicuous part of every copy of such book.<br /> (7) Where proceedings are taken for the infringement<br /> of the performing right in any dramatic or musical work<br /> published as a book, the defendant in such proceedings may<br /> be acquitted of such infringement, and may be entitled to<br /> the costs of resisting the proceedings, if he proves to the<br /> satisfaction of the court that he has in his possession a copy<br /> of the book containing such dramatio or musical work, and<br /> that such copy was published with the assent of the owner<br /> of the copyright, and does not contain the notice required<br /> by this Act of the reservation of the performing right; but<br /> in any such case the owner of the performing right, if he is<br /> not also the owner of the copyright, shall be entitled to<br /> recover from the owner of the copyright damages in respect<br /> of the injury he may have incurred by the neglect of the<br /> owner of the copyright to cause due notice to be given of<br /> the reservation of the performing right.<br /> I find no such vexatious provisions in the case of<br /> a work which is not dramatic in form. The result<br /> seems to be this: that the theatrical possibilities<br /> of a novel, which is not necessarily intended for<br /> the stage, are automatically protected; whilst a<br /> work the very form of which shows that it is<br /> intended for the stage, if published as a book,<br /> must be conspicuously labelled with such intention,<br /> or it is at the mercy of any thief who comes along,<br /> who is positively indemnified for his “costs” of<br /> fighting the rightful owner! Let me put a case.<br /> “The Second Mrs. Tanqueray” is published as a<br /> book. If, through inadvertence, a single copy<br /> were issued without this label, the value of the<br /> right of representation might be lost to Mr.<br /> Pinero for ever. This negotiable copy would<br /> carry the right of representation on its face, and<br /> Mr. Pineru&#039;s own original MS. might become so<br /> much waste paper.<br /> III.—THE SIXPENNY Book.<br /> The Manchester Guardian has a few remarks<br /> on my paper in last month&#039;s Author concerning<br /> the sixpenny book. The writer does not agree<br /> with me. He says:<br /> We should be inclined rather to think that a sixpenny<br /> edition of a new and successful writer&#039;s first book may intro-<br /> duce his work to many who would otherwise have ignored<br /> it, but who may then think it worth while to bay his next<br /> books in a dearer form or to order them from the libraries.<br /> He also thinks that the sixpenny novel is<br /> bought in the train in the place of a magazine or<br /> a journal.<br /> Nobody, he says, who has any respectable<br /> library is likely to put sixpenny books on his<br /> shelves : he buys them to read and throw away.<br /> He also says that I speak on the evidence of a<br /> single bookseller.<br /> It always does gond to hear an opposite<br /> opinion. As to the above objections, I admit<br /> that the production of a new and unknown<br /> writer&#039;s book in a sixpenny form might give him<br /> the start that he wants. There is, however, an<br /> objection in limine. No publisher will venture<br /> to bring out a book by a new writer at sixpence.<br /> The risk is too great: the public can hardly be<br /> expected to buy, even at sixpence, the work of a<br /> new and unknown writer to the number of some<br /> 40,000, which must be taken up in order to pay<br /> expenses.<br /> That a sixpenny book may be bought in a train<br /> instead of a magazine or a paper is certainly possi.<br /> ble: nay, it bappens every day and all day long.<br /> Nobody who has a respectable library, will put<br /> sixpenny books on their shelves. That is also<br /> true. But should we offer good books in such<br /> garb as to be unfit for decent shelves ?<br /> It is not one bookseller, but persons in the<br /> book trade, publishers as well as booksellers, who<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 101 (#141) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 101<br /> have spoken to me to this effect concerning the<br /> fatal sixpenny book.<br /> My objections remain :<br /> 1. People very soon get accustomed to pay six-<br /> pence for a book and will not, if they can help it,<br /> give more.<br /> 2. The low price encourages a low view of<br /> literature. Who will value a thing that costs six-<br /> pence, amuses for an hour, and then is thrown<br /> away? How much does one value a sixpenny toy ?<br /> 3. The American example is still fresh in one&#039;s<br /> mind, where the market was flooded with sixpenny<br /> books—the best and most valued productions of<br /> the best authors. The public bought them;<br /> read them for amusement; read them uncritically<br /> and carelessly; threw them away, and thought<br /> no more about book or author.<br /> 4. I do not say that the sale of a sixpenny<br /> book always prevents the sale of a dearer book.<br /> I do say, however, that in many, very many, cases<br /> it does, and that it takes a great many sixpenny<br /> books to make up, either for publisher or author,<br /> one six-shilling book.<br /> 5. Also I do say that the instance I recorded<br /> where, at an important railway stall, I found<br /> actually no new books at all except the sixpenny<br /> book, is not a solitary case.<br /> 6. And I do say, also, that the experience of<br /> the manager of that railway bookstall, to the<br /> effect that no one would look at a book priced<br /> higher than sixpence, is not a solitary experience.<br /> I would also say this. I have received many<br /> letters on this subject. I find that there is a<br /> large class of people with very small incomes who<br /> are delighted at the chance of getting good books<br /> at so cheap a price. One cannot but feel the<br /> greatest sympathy with these people. Their case<br /> might surely be met by a simple limitation of the<br /> sixpenny issue to books which have stood the test<br /> of time--say, for ten or fifteen years. Books in<br /> demand after that time are pretty sure to be good<br /> books, while their sale at so low a price would not<br /> probably affect the sale of the new and higher<br /> priced candidates for success.<br /> W. B.<br /> lawfully published in any part of Her Majesty&#039;s dominions<br /> other than Canada, and if it is proved to the satisfaction of<br /> the Minister of Agriculture that the owner of the copyright<br /> so subsisting and of the copyright acquired by such publi.<br /> cation has lawfully granted a license to reproduce in Canada,<br /> from movable or other types, or from stereotype plates, or<br /> from electro-plates, or from lithograph stones, or by any<br /> process for facsimile reproduction, an edition or editions of<br /> such book designed for sale only in Canada, the Minister<br /> may, notwithstanding anything in the Copyright Act, by<br /> order under his hand, prohibit the importation, except with<br /> the written consent of the licensee, into Canada of any<br /> copies of such book printed elsewhere ; provided that two<br /> such copies may be specially imported for the bona fide use<br /> of any public free library or any university or college<br /> library, or for the library of any duly incorporated instita.<br /> tion or society for the use of the members of such institu-<br /> tion or society.<br /> 2. Suspension or revocation of prohibition.-The Minister<br /> of Agriculture may at any time in like manner, by order<br /> under his hand, suspend or revoke such prohibition upon<br /> importation if it is proved to his satisfaction that,<br /> (a) the license to reproduce in Canada has torminated or<br /> expired; or<br /> (6) the reasonable demand for the book in Canada is not<br /> sufficiently met without importation; or<br /> (c) the book is not, having regard to the demand therefor<br /> in Canada, being suitably printed or published; or<br /> (d) any other state of things exists on account of which it<br /> is not in the public interest to further prohibit<br /> importation.<br /> 3. Failure of licensee to supply book. -At any time after<br /> the importation of a book has been prohibited under<br /> section 1 of this Act, any person resident or being in<br /> Canada may apply, either directly or through a bookseller<br /> or other agent, to the person so licensed to reproduce such<br /> book, for a copy of any edition of such book then on sale<br /> and reasonably obtainable in the United Kingdom or some<br /> other part of Her Majesty&#039;s dominions, and it shall then be<br /> the duty of the person so licensed, as soon as reasonably<br /> may be, to import and sell such copy to the person so<br /> applying therefor, at the ordinary selling price of such copy<br /> in the United Kingdom or such other part of Her Majesty&#039;s<br /> dominions, with the duty and reasonable forwarding charges<br /> added ; and the failure or neglect, without lawful excuse, of<br /> the person so licensed to supply such copy within a reason.<br /> able time, shall be a reason for which the Minister may, if<br /> he sees fit, suspend or revoke the prohibition upon impor-<br /> tation.<br /> 4. Customs Department to be notified.-The Minister<br /> sball forth with inform the Department of Customs of any<br /> order made by him ander this Act.<br /> 5. Penalty for unlawful importation.-All books im-<br /> ported in contravention of this Act may be seized by any<br /> officer of Customs, and shall be forfeited to the Crown and<br /> destroyed; and any person importing, or causing or per-<br /> mitting the importation, of any book in contravention of<br /> this Act shall, for each offence, be liable, upon summary<br /> conviction, to a penalty not exceeding one hundred dollars.<br /> It is almost impossible to overrate the import-<br /> ance of the Act from the point of view of Imperial<br /> copyright. Articles have been from time to time<br /> printed in The Author dealing exhaustively with<br /> the history of Canadian copyright and the<br /> Canadian book trade. In these the practical ruin<br /> of the Canadian book trade by the Foreign<br /> Reprints Act, and the subsequent struggle by the<br /> Canadian printer and the Canadian trades under<br /> IV.-CANADIAN COPYRIGHT Act.<br /> The following is the text of the Canadian<br /> Copyright Act passed on July 18, 1900 :<br /> 63 &amp; 64 VICTORIA, CHAP. 25.<br /> An Act to amend the Copyright Act.- Assented to 18th<br /> July, 1900.]<br /> Her Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the<br /> Senate and House of Commons of Canada, enacts as<br /> follows:<br /> 1. In case of license to reprint book copyrighted in United<br /> Kingdom or British possession, Minister may prohibit im.<br /> portation of other reprints. If a book as to which there is<br /> subsisting copyright under the Copyright Act has been first<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 102 (#142) ############################################<br /> <br /> 102<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> the leadership of Sir John Thompson, have also THE PENSION FUND OF THE INCORPO-<br /> been reviewed. It has been demonstrated that RATED SOCIETY OF AUTHORS.<br /> the passing of the American Copyright Law,<br /> falsely supposed to injure the Canadians, in M HE scheme of the Pension Fund as finally<br /> reality was the turning point in favour of the settled was printed in the July number of<br /> book trade, and that the refusal of the Canadian - The Author.<br /> Government to collect royalties under the Foreign The Committee now desire to inform the<br /> Reprints Act gave that trade an additional members of the Society that the fund is legally<br /> impetus. Those who care to study the reasons constituted, and hasten to acknowledge the<br /> for these deductions are referred to the past valuable suggestions that were received prior to<br /> numbers of The Author. One point, however, its final settlement.<br /> was wanting to secure a completely satisfactory Mr. J. M. Lely, Mr. E. Clodd, and Mr. Douglas<br /> settlement, namely, legislation by the Canadian W. Freshfield have kindly consented to act as<br /> Government along the right lines. Sir John trustees of the Fund, and have signed all the<br /> Thompson had fought the cause of the printer deeds necessary to confirm their appointment.<br /> and the tradesman against the author whose The Pension Fund Committee will be appointed,<br /> property was being much dealt with.<br /> as provided by the scheme, at the next annual<br /> Did Sir Wilfrid Laurier and his Cabinet desire general meeting. Notice will be given in The<br /> to adopt a similar point of view ?<br /> Author as to the method of nominating candi-<br /> There were two aspects to this question : (1) dates, and it is hoped that a large number of the<br /> The Imperial and International; (2) the Cana members of the Society will show their interest<br /> dian. If Sir John Thompson&#039;s methods were in the scheme by voting on that occasion.<br /> followed it appeared clear that the present The following details as to the present position<br /> Imperial and International legislation would of the Fund will be of interest to the members :<br /> become chaotic, and that any future beneficial The sum total of donations promised and paid<br /> legislation would be indefinitely postponed. To amounts to £1169 48. 6d. Of this total nearly<br /> counteract this the supposed benefit to the £1000 has been received, and by far the greater<br /> Canadian would be in reality but a fresh disaster. portion is already invested in the names of the<br /> Four or five years ago, before the present Govern trustees.<br /> ment in Canada came into power, the Committee The sum total of annual subscriptions amounts<br /> of the Society of Authors saw clearly that the to £94 138.<br /> settlement of the Canadian question involved the It is calculated that the investment of the<br /> larger issue, and accordingly struggled to get donations will produce about £30 a year; this sum,<br /> the matter satisfactorily settled. In 1895 Mr. together with the proportion of subscriptions<br /> Hall Caine consented at the request of the available for pensions under the scheme, will make<br /> Committee to act as the Society&#039;s delegate in the total amount available about £60.<br /> Canada. The position that Mr. Caine combated In this calculation, however, no margin is<br /> was, however, subsequently altered owing to the allowed for working expenses, and it cannot be<br /> sudden death of Sir John Thompson.<br /> expected that services in connection with the Fund<br /> Early in 1898 the Committee prepared an hitherto given gratuitously should not in the<br /> exhaustive report on the question, and appointed future involve a charge on the Fund.<br /> Mr. G. H. Thring, the Secretary of their Society, In any event it is hoped that the Pension Com-<br /> to represent them on a mission to Canada.<br /> mittee, when elected, will be in a position at once<br /> A report of this mission and its object has been to allot a substantial pension. It is most desir-<br /> printed in the October number of The Author, able that they should be able to grant at least one<br /> and the above print of the Bill is all that is neces. other adequate pension immediately, besides<br /> sary to complete the matter.<br /> meeting all working expenses.<br /> It may be confidently asserted that, owing to The establishment of the Fund has been re-<br /> the steps which have been taken by Sir Wilfrid ceived with general approvement by<br /> Laurier and his able colleague, Mr. Sydney but at present actual pecuniary support has<br /> Fisher, in whose hands lies the copyright matter been given by a comparatively small number of<br /> in Canada, the Imperial Government will be persons.<br /> free to take up Lord Monkswell&#039;s Bill, which has The Committee would impress upon the Society<br /> the support in its main features of the authors the desirability of widening the field of support,<br /> and publishers of Great Britain, and, it it hoped, not merely from the point of view of increasing<br /> of the Colonial Governments also. If this result the Fund, but of identifying the Society at large<br /> is obtained a great advance will have been made with this effort to provide for deserving, but com-<br /> in the history of copyright legislation.<br /> mercially unsuccessful, authors.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 103 (#143) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 103<br /> Annual subscriptions from 58. and upwards are<br /> cordially invited, and should be notified to the<br /> Secretary without delay.<br /> They may be paid together with the annual<br /> subscriptions either by banker&#039;s order (which is<br /> preferred) or direct to the Secretary.<br /> The scheme, reprinted from The Author, may<br /> be had on application to the Secretary.<br /> PARIS LETTER.<br /> 4 bis, rue des Beaux Arts.<br /> THE Great Exhibition is slowly drawing<br /> towards its apogee-and its end. Inter-<br /> national congresses are still its favourite<br /> diversion. The memorandum of the five days&#039;<br /> International Peace Congress included the pass.<br /> ing of a vote of censure on Great Britain for her<br /> action in South Africa. Among other speakers.<br /> the well-known French writer Mme. Séverine<br /> delivered an address with her usual eloquent<br /> volubility. She declared herself struck by the<br /> despondent tone which prevailed among the<br /> orators present.<br /> “What matter if the present escape us?” cried<br /> she. “An invisible harvest is sprouting. The<br /> words of Peace and Justice have penetrated the<br /> deepest strata of humanity. Let us continue our<br /> labour, as did those generations of slaves who<br /> constructed the Pyramids without knowing what<br /> form they would one day have. We shall not<br /> house the harvest, certes. What does that<br /> matter? If only a single ear of corn one day<br /> sprouts on our tombs, we shall be sufficiently<br /> paid for having believed and willed !”<br /> Apropos of the other international assemblages<br /> -the Congress of Spiritualists, patronised by MM.<br /> Anatole France and Victorien Sardou, aroused<br /> much interest among the initiated. The pro-<br /> ceedings of the Women&#039;s Congress were generally<br /> remarkable for their sobriety of speech and<br /> logical perception of the end in view, while the<br /> papers read at the Sociology Congress were<br /> highly interesting from a technical point of view.<br /> The next Sociology Congress will be held at<br /> Glasgow; and the memoranda forwarded by<br /> foreigners unable to attend during the sittings of<br /> the present congress will shortly be published by<br /> M. René Worms, secretary-general, in the Annales<br /> de l&#039;Institut International de Sociologie.<br /> DRAMATIC NOTES.<br /> M. Coquelin, senior, is registering a golden<br /> harvest for the Association des Artistes Drama<br /> tiques by the personal sale of tickets for a grand<br /> lottery on behalf of the superannuated female<br /> members of the association of which he is pre-<br /> sident. The Sociéte des Auteurs et Compositeurs<br /> Dramatiques has also obtained an unexpected<br /> stroke of good luck. In renewing his contract<br /> with the committee of the latter society, M.<br /> Antoine (director of the theatre of the same<br /> name) spontaneously offered to raise the author&#039;s<br /> royalty from 10 to 12 per cent. Needless to add<br /> that this generous proposition was gratefully<br /> accepted by M. Sardou, president of the society.<br /> The “ Patrie ” of the above celebrated drama-<br /> tist will be one of the first plays performed in the<br /> new Comédie Française, which is expected to<br /> open about Dec. 29. The building will be lit by<br /> 2500 electric lamps, which are reported to give a<br /> light 25 per cent. stronger than that which<br /> formerly illuminated the scene of this historic<br /> building.<br /> POPULAR PLAYS.<br /> Meantime the “ Aiglon” of M. Edmond<br /> Rostand (Théâtre Sarah Bernhardt) is enjoying<br /> the phenomenal success which usually attends<br /> that famous author&#039;s productions. Its receipts<br /> have already surpassed two million francs, show-<br /> ing an average of 10,373 francs 15 cents per<br /> performance. M. Rostand has recently quitted<br /> Paris in accordance with his physician&#039;s advice, in<br /> order to recuperate his health by a temporary<br /> residence at Cambo-les-Bains.<br /> The respective revival of “ Le Rêve&quot; of M.<br /> Louis Gallet (Opéra Comique), adapted from M.<br /> Zola&#039;s celebrated novel of the same name, and of<br /> the “Demi Vierges ” of M. Marcel Prévost<br /> (Athénée Theatre), have likewise been drawing<br /> crowded houses. M. Bruneau, the “innovator<br /> and iconoclast who has proscribed the cavatina<br /> and arioso,&quot; is responsible for the superb music<br /> which accompanies the former play. He is also<br /> the ardent friend and disciple of M. Zola, for<br /> whom he avows “an unbounded admiration and<br /> a filial affection.” “It is by reading Zola&#039;s works<br /> that I have understood my vocation,&quot; he remarked<br /> on one occasion. “It is Zola who made me com-<br /> prehend that it was possible to attempt in music<br /> what he has himself realised in literature.” The<br /> first performance of the “ Assommoir” of the<br /> latter author is announced for November i at the<br /> Porte-Saint-Martin theatre.<br /> M. Marcel Prévost, the author of the “Demi<br /> Vierges,&quot; is one of the most popular writers in<br /> Paris. None have better understood, or more<br /> finely portrayed, the mysteries of the complex<br /> heart and mind of the Parisienne fin de siècle.<br /> As a psychological vivisectionist of the feminine<br /> mind he occupies a unique position in French<br /> literature. M. Bourget analyses the past and<br /> present, while M. Prévost develops the types of<br /> the future.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 104 (#144) ############################################<br /> <br /> 104<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> A MORTUARY PARAGRAPH.<br /> writer over the minds of his readers. Under<br /> Three deaths have been deplored in literary these circumstances it is not surprising that the<br /> circles during the past month :-<br /> latest volume of the “ Oeuvres complètes<br /> (1.) That of M. Adolphe Hatzfield, “ docteur d’Alphonse Daudet ” (issued by M. A. Houssiaux)<br /> ès lettres ” and professor of rhetoric at the Louis should be reported as having a brisk sale. It is<br /> le-Grand College, who had the happiness to survive cleverly illustrated by M. Dawant. Alphonse<br /> until the publication of his monumental achieve Daudet particularly insisted on the necessity of<br /> ment, “ Le Dictionnaire de la langue Française,” absolute exactitude in the reproduction of a<br /> which has recently been awarded a Grand Prix personage in print, “jusqu à la couleur des<br /> by the Exhibition commissioners. At the date cheveux, à la forme du nez, à un tic, à une<br /> when he commenced this work (in collaboration grimace qui semblent nécessaires, indispensables<br /> with MM. Thomas and Darmesteter), M. Hatz. à la silhouette !” Nature—that marvellous artist<br /> field counted on finishing it in three years. The -in accentuating a character (so he asserted) com-<br /> undertaking, however, proved more arduous than pleted the physical by the moral in such a manner<br /> be anticipated. Nearly thirty years have expired that the least modification appeared a trickery.<br /> between the commencement and conclusion of this The individual type carries with him son mobilier,<br /> Herculean labour, begun in 1870. M. Hatzfield, ses vêtements, sa manière, tout son cadre!<br /> who was of Hebrew origin, had attained the It is this absolute fidelity to nature, this<br /> mature age of seventy-five years.<br /> masterly reproduction of outline and colouring<br /> (2.) Likewise of Hebrew origin was the gentle united to a poetical imagination, which have won<br /> poet Louis Ratisbonne, who died at the ancient Alphonse Daudet the high place he occupies<br /> Palais de Luxembourg (Palais du Senat), where among modern French writers.<br /> he filled the post of librarian. Colleague and Two new busts have, likewise, been voted by<br /> friend of Leconte de Lisle, Charles Edmond. the Société des Gens de Lettres. The first to<br /> Anatole France, Albert Sorel, Jules Janin, and a M. E. Hamel, whose efforts have greatly benefited<br /> host of other celebrities; author of “ La Comédie the society; the second to M. Emile Richebourg,<br /> Enfantine.” “ Les Petites Femmes.&quot; ~ Les Petits the popular novelist. The statue of Balzac<br /> Hommes,&quot; “ Les Figures Jeunes,&quot; “ Les Six (modelled by Falquière) will shortly be erected in<br /> Alsaciennes,&quot; and other poems of merit, he still the Place du Palais Royal, in front of the<br /> counted among his proudest distinctions that of Ministère des Finances.<br /> being the friend and testamentary executor of<br /> Alfred de Vigny, and the editor of the latter&#039;s<br /> BULLETINS DE SANTÉ.<br /> two posthumous works respectively entitled Mme. Juliette Adam has recovered her usual<br /> Les Destinées” and “ Le Journal d&#039;un Poète.” health, and is now intent on launching a new fort-<br /> In his own last testament (dated Feb. 15, 1900) nightly publication entitled Parole Française à<br /> Louis Ratisbonne directed that his mortal l&#039;étranger, in which she proposes dealing with<br /> remains should be incinerated and placed in an foreign politics and other interesting topics.<br /> urn surmounted by a stela. He further added Previous to her temporary retirement, Mme.<br /> that if this urn were taken to the Montmartre Adam occupied the post of editress of the<br /> cemetery and placed as near as possible to the Nouvelle Revue during a period of twenty years.<br /> tomb of his friend and benefactor, the great poet M. Henri de Regnier, who has been suffering<br /> Alfred de Vigny, his shade would rest content from congestion of the lungs, is reported con-<br /> (3.) His unfortunate brother-poet, Gabriel valescent. His illness is attributed to overwork,<br /> Vicaire, generally known as the author of and the fatigues incurred during his American<br /> “ Émaux Bressans,&quot; died in a maison de santé in trip. According to the New York papers, M.<br /> Montsouris Park, aged fifty-two years. Highly Gaston Deschamps will be the next French<br /> appreciated by his literary comrades, his best pro lecturer at the Harvard University, under whose<br /> ductions remained comparatively unknown to the auspices he will deliver eight lectures on “Le<br /> multitude. He was also the author of several Théâtre Contemporain.” M. Deschamps proposes<br /> successful plays and of a satirical work entitled leaving Paris in the beginning of February and<br /> “Les Déliquescences d&#039;Adoré Floupette,&quot; which returning about the middle of May, employing<br /> enjoyed great popularity.<br /> the intervening time in lecturing in the principal<br /> American universities.<br /> M. ALPHONSE DAUDET.<br /> The large number of subscriptions already<br /> New Books.<br /> received by the Société des Gens de Lettres for Among interesting publications of the month<br /> the erection of an Alphonse Daudet monument will be found :-“ Études sur l&#039;Esthétique Musi-<br /> shows the influence still wielded by the defunct cale,” by M. Ch. Grandmougin, a volume com-<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 105 (#145) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> · 105<br /> mencing with the Ancient Greeks and ending<br /> with the great French and German composers of<br /> our own day; a volume of soliloquies entitled<br /> “Doléances,” by Jehan Rictus, a work suitable<br /> for those readers who do not disdain “ le spec-<br /> tacle des plus hideux bas-fonds sociaux”;<br /> “Corridas de Toros,&quot; by M. D. Cialdine, a<br /> book whose title sufficiently explains its subject<br /> (Société libre d&#039;édition des Gens de Lettres);<br /> “ Sérénissime,&quot; by M. Ernest La Jeunesse, a<br /> highly improbable narrative reputed to be a<br /> roman à clef (chez Charpentier); “ Croquis<br /> d&#039;outre-Manche,&quot; being the outcome of the obser-<br /> vations and investigations nade for that purpose<br /> by M. Hector France during his stay in England;<br /> and “ La Trilogie d&#039;Amour,” a posthumous poem<br /> edited by the family of a deceased young poet<br /> and painter of great promise, M. Marin Follet.<br /> DARRACOTTE SCOTT.<br /> that the writer would try again. He wrote soon<br /> after reporting renewed failure, and proposed to<br /> publish the volume himself if the author would<br /> take £15 worth of orders for the book at 3s. 6d.<br /> and guarantee another £15 in the event of the<br /> sales to the public not amounting to so much. He<br /> obtained a third sum of money out of the author<br /> for alterations and additious. The book came out.<br /> Nobody bought a copy, and Mr. Morgan is now<br /> threatening Mr. N. with legal proceedings for the<br /> recovery of £15. Iu other words, he wants to get<br /> altogether £35 for the book. The editor of Truth<br /> says that he has seen the book, and taken estimates<br /> of the cost of production, and that £25 would<br /> fully pay the cost of an edition of 500 copies.<br /> But has he printed and bound 500 copies ?<br /> Probably he has printed and bound about 100<br /> - the unfortunate author taking £15 worth,<br /> or eighty-six copies.<br /> Truth proceeds to point out that the whole trans-<br /> action is a swindle. The author has been induced<br /> NOTES AND NEWS.<br /> to believe that there will be no profits until £30<br /> worth has been sold. But there will then already<br /> IT is now eight years since the exposure by be a profit in the publisher&#039;s hands. Next, the book<br /> 1 Truth of a gang who preyed on the credulous never had a chance of making a profitable sale, a<br /> by means of a bogus “Literary Association” thing which Morgan must have i nown very well.<br /> led to the trial and conviction of the principals. The idea that a collection of trifles by an unknown<br /> The leader, one Morgan, was sentenced to eight author will sell at all is ridiculous.<br /> years penal servitude, the severity of the sentence<br /> marking the heinousness of the offence. Morgan<br /> is now reported to be out again, and to have<br /> I quite agree with every word. I would, how-<br /> returned without any delay to his old courses.<br /> ever, point out that another form of the trick,<br /> He is said to have started another “ Literary&#039;<br /> which we have exposed over and over again, is<br /> society. Membership means a guinea a year:<br /> quite as dishonest. The way of it is this (for<br /> in return the “ proprietor” kindly offers to<br /> the hundredth time): A writer sends his MS. to<br /> place the MSS. of authors before publishers<br /> one of the worthy merchants who live by this<br /> “who pay from £50 to £200 for reliable<br /> and similar methods. He receives back a reply-<br /> three - volume novels.” Observe that since<br /> almost always in these words :<br /> his seclusion the three-volume novel has become<br /> “ Our reader reports so favourably of your<br /> extinct; as they do not supply the daily and<br /> MS. that we are induced to offer you the follow-<br /> weekly papers in the mansion where Morgan<br /> ing favourable terms. You to pay us £75 (or<br /> spent his eight years he may be excused for not<br /> any other fancy figure)-half on signing the agree-<br /> knowing the fact. However, the “proprietor”<br /> ment, and the other half on receiving the first<br /> saves himself by offering to place other and<br /> proofs (or some other time). This will constitute<br /> shorter stories, music, paintings, &amp;c. He also<br /> your sole liability. We will undertake all future<br /> proposes to found a magazine for the contri-<br /> editions to meet the demand, and we will divide<br /> butions of his members. This is all in the old<br /> the profits, giving you two-thirds and taking one-<br /> style co inuch admired by the judge in the year<br /> third to ourselves.”<br /> 1892. Truth has begun a new exposure of this<br /> Sometimes they offer the author apparently<br /> worthy. It gives the particulars of one case,<br /> much better terms, and they generally end with<br /> which is as follows.<br /> these words : “We shall be glad to have your<br /> acceptance of this offer, and to put the work in<br /> A member of this precious society named N. hand at once. We have proved that the month of<br /> confided a MS. to the proprietor. After a short<br /> is the best time of the year for publishing.&quot;<br /> delay, he received a note speaking in high praise<br /> of the work, lamenting the “blindness ” of pub-<br /> lishers, and stating that it had so far failed, but<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 106 (#146) ############################################<br /> <br /> 106<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> Observe that there are two or three houses literature may bring about the manufacture of books like<br /> which do hardly any other kind of publishing, and<br /> the manufacture of bicycles, and their distribution by<br /> commercial travellers like the other products of the mana-<br /> several which try the same game. The swindle is<br /> facturers. In that case the publisher will have just the<br /> the same as Morgan&#039;s. They lead the author to same standing in the business world as any other manu-<br /> believe that there will be further editions, and facturer, and will not impose upon the public any longer as<br /> that there will be profits. Now they know per. a necessity in the literary field.”<br /> fectly well that the MS. is in almost every case One remarks that the writer considers 10 per<br /> pure rubbish, and absolutely certain not to sell any cent. the general royalty paid to authors. But<br /> copies to speak of ; that there will be no future the English author in America does a great deal<br /> editions ; and that there can be no profits. How better than that, while with us a 10 per cent.<br /> can we bring these creatures to justice ?<br /> royalty could only be offered either to unknown<br /> writers or under some exceptional conditions.<br /> What is said about a time limit is well worth<br /> There is at the office of the Society a collection consideration. The method has been adopted<br /> of letters of this kind in which every month, by some authors already. But there is a danger<br /> except one, is in turn alleged to be the best time which must be guarded against. The publisher,<br /> of the whole year for publishing.<br /> even under a time agreement, claims the right of<br /> selling off what remains. He may even, unless<br /> prevented, issue a new edition immediately before<br /> Another merry trickster&#039;s game is this. The the termination of his time, and go on selling<br /> publisher makes the author guarantee a sale of this edition until it has run out.<br /> so many hundred copies in so many months-say<br /> 400 in six months—or the difference between the<br /> number sold and that number. Sometimes he<br /> Literature (Oct. 27) reports that in Belgium,<br /> offers a small royalty on a second edition. But under the title “Ligue pour le Livre Belge,&quot; a<br /> he never says anything about the first edition. society is being founded which, by means of sub-<br /> There is nothing to prevent him, if the book scriptions, will assure a regular reading public<br /> should have a circulation, from making his first<br /> in their own country to Belgian authors. The<br /> edition any number he pleases : the author will<br /> new league will supplement the lending library,<br /> have nothing out of it. And suppose he chooses<br /> and enable the public to buy new works more<br /> to begin advertising six months after the work is frequently. It has secured the patronage and<br /> nominally produced. What then? Who is to<br /> co-operation of “ nearly all the foremost men of<br /> stop him ? Morgan! Hapless Morgan! It is literature and art.”<br /> an unequal world. Thy fate was hard. Skilly<br /> and a narrow cell and an unæsthetic prison Two members of the Committee of Management<br /> chapel, while thy brother in tricks and traps goes of the Society of Authors have been elected to<br /> attired in broadcloth to a lovely church and, the new Parliament. Mr. Gilbert Parker won<br /> after the service, home to roast beef and pudding! Gravesend for the Conservative party by a<br /> majority of 738 over the Liberal candidate; and<br /> Mr. Henry Norman captured for the Liberals<br /> The following is an extract from a letter by a the constituency of Wolverhampton (South),<br /> distinguished American author:-<br /> gaining a majority of 169 votes over his Liberal<br /> &quot;I certainly do not think our own publishers, the best of Unionist opponent. Both gentlemen enter<br /> them, have been as grasping and greedy as yours, but they<br /> Parliament for the first time. Let us wish them<br /> bave fallen into the habit of considering the author as their<br /> own private property, to be exploited for the pecuniary<br /> all the success that they can desire in this new<br /> benefit of the publisher. As you know, our pretty uniform<br /> field.<br /> practice in this country is for the author to receive 10 per<br /> WALTER BESANT.<br /> cent. on the retail price of all books sold. Some of the<br /> publishers reckon this to be equal to half profits, and I<br /> fancy that in rendering the half-profit account they would<br /> make it come to about 10 percent. I think our main<br /> difficulty here would be met largely if we could return to the<br /> old practice of letting the publisher print a certain number<br /> of books or for a certain period of time, and let the author<br /> resume control at the end of it. Doubtless the publisher is<br /> a necessary factor in a country the size of oars, and I see<br /> at present no way of eliminating him, especially as the<br /> bookseller himself has practically disappeared as an intel.<br /> ligent agent and become a mere dealer in Yankee notions<br /> and periodicals; but the present commercial tendency in<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 107 (#147) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 107<br /> THE FOUR WINDS.<br /> work. “ Cheap and Nasty &quot; is the burden of the<br /> song.<br /> Wind of the North,<br /> Now, sir, although all may be “fair in love and<br /> Wind of the Norland onows,<br /> war,” the commonest of “ Cheap Jacks” would<br /> Wind of the winnowed skies, and sbarp, clear stars, --<br /> scorn the idea of comparing his wares with those<br /> Blow cold and keen across the naked bills,<br /> of his pal over the way. Is it not enough that<br /> And crisp the lowland pools with crystal films,<br /> And blar the casement squares with glittering ice,<br /> his own are dirt cheap at double the price? And<br /> But go not near my love.<br /> yet, from some singular oversight, you permit a<br /> Wind of the West,<br /> regular advertiser, as aforesaid, not only to vaunt<br /> Wind of the few, far clouds,<br /> the superiority of his typing over that of a<br /> Wiod of the gold and crimson sunset lands,<br /> brother struggler for a livelihood, but to vilify<br /> Blow fresh and pare across the peaks and plaine,<br /> the latter&#039;s unseen fruit of toil as necessarily<br /> And broaden the blae spaces of the beavens,<br /> inaccurate and illiterate. Why? Because the<br /> And sway the grasses and the mountain pines,<br /> But let my dear one rest.<br /> price of 8d. per 1000 is ruinous to his market,<br /> Wind of the East,<br /> forsooth! Perhaps this Academical typer is not<br /> Wind of the sunrise Beas,<br /> aware that even our self-willed Kaiser of yore,<br /> Wind of the clinging inists and gray, harsh rains,-- Harry VIII., egregiously failed in an attempt to<br /> Blow moist and chill across the wastes of brine,<br /> regulate the price of labour. Who, then, is<br /> And shut the sun out, and tbe moon and stars,<br /> this rival to the most thorough-going ruler<br /> And lash the boughs against the dripping eaves,<br /> Yet keep thou from my love.<br /> England ever had ?<br /> Now it so happens that a corresponding crime<br /> But thou, sweet wind !<br /> Wind of the fragrant South,<br /> --that of poverty-has brought me into contact<br /> Wind from the bowers of jasmine and of rose, -<br /> and fellowship with this daring interloper in the<br /> Over magnolia blooms and lilied lakes<br /> public market with the following result :-<br /> And flowering forests come with dewy wings,<br /> (1) Being an invalid and addicted to pencil<br /> And stir the petals at her feet, and kiss<br /> scribbling on any available scrap of paper, often<br /> The low mound where she lies.<br /> in a style of kakography that would make the<br /> CHARLES HENRY LUDERS.<br /> cleverest compositor&#039;s hair stand on end-the<br /> The above poem appears in Mr. E. C. Stedman&#039;s typist&#039;s copy has been promptly returned without<br /> “ American Anthology,” a long-expected work a flaw, quite a picture of delight. This pencilled<br /> which has just been published in the United scrawl with the typed copy is a too favourable<br /> States. We take it from the Evening Post of case in point.<br /> New York, which refers to the poem as “an (2) I have further treated my poor, disabled<br /> instance of the fine forgotten things” that this brother tu transcribing work from books, involv.<br /> Anthology brings to light again.<br /> ing hieroglyphic references here, there, and every-<br /> where; and it has been returned executed with<br /> intelligent skill.<br /> (3) I have sent him undecipherable letters from<br /> CORRESPONDENCE.<br /> learned scholars, and received them accurately<br /> and sensibly rendered into legible English, and<br /> all without a grumble.<br /> 1.-“ LIVE AND LET LIVE.”<br /> Every atom of this I can prove in detail, and I<br /> IT NOWING how well you merit the famous am willing, on my friend&#039;s behalf, to challenge a<br /> n motto, sans peur et sans reproche, I have competition by way of earnest of good faith as<br /> full confidence in submitting a point of well as faith in a gentleman personally unknown<br /> business etiquette to your notice. I refer to the to me. I have, however, heard that he is one of<br /> newly appointed order of gens d&#039;industrie that, those heroes of industry early struck down in the<br /> for the sake of shortness and accuracy, may be battle of life by rheumatic fever, and yet toiling<br /> called Typists or Typers-poetically authors&#039; along, cheerfully and peacefully, to keep the wolf<br /> blessings.<br /> from the door-suffering under but one jarring<br /> Naturally vour journal is a favourite organ for discord arising from the croaking of a jealous and<br /> “ bold advertisement,” and equally so every probably prosperous rival. J. S. LAURIE.<br /> vendor of bis wares is entitled to vaunt their un-<br /> paralleled excellence and price to his or her heart&#039;s<br /> content. But it seems to me the bounds of fair<br /> II.—WHAT IS A Fair Price ?<br /> competition are transgressed when pains are “A Typist &quot; sends me, as a proof that 8d. per<br /> taken by one of your clients, actually without 1000 words is a common charge for copying ordi-<br /> verification, to depreciate the character of a rival&#039;s nary MS., six advertisements, cut from London<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 108 (#148) ############################################<br /> <br /> 108<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> daily papers, all offering work at that price. -turned a fact into fiction in the following<br /> Another correspondent asks that The Author extract :-<br /> would name a fair price. This is impossible, “There is in London what is called a Society<br /> manifestly. In all kinds of work, competition, of Authors, which is supposed to resemble the<br /> supply, and demand regulate prices. I should Société des Gens de Lettres in Paris, but the<br /> think that handwriting would have something to English society appears to be chiefly an associa-<br /> do with the “fair price” of typing. For instance, tion for the multiplication and publication of<br /> the handwriting of Dean Stanley was almost inferior works, and its authority on literature is<br /> illegible. His friend, the late Sir George Grove, nil.”<br /> put a great deal of his work through the Press. It is a pity that Ouida&#039;s explorations in the<br /> and was, I believe, the only man who was able, land of facts could only induce her to indite this<br /> and that with difficulty, to read the MS. His monstrous fiction. Comment is unnecessary.<br /> writing resembled the movements of a fly rescued<br /> ISIDORE G. ASCHER.<br /> from the ink. Surely, with such writing special<br /> terms would be required. I can only advise the<br /> obvious course that typewriters should continue<br /> V.–For Nothing.<br /> to charge a price that affords them a fair return<br /> Does it not seem unfair that the rejected work<br /> for their work as long as competition allows them of amateur authors is yet so frequently used by<br /> to get it, and that writers who have every reason the editors of journals who set literary competi-<br /> to be satisfied with the work done for them tions ?<br /> should not strive to get it done. at starvation<br /> Woman, a paper which had a reputation con.<br /> prices. Above and beyond all others, writing siderably higher than that of any other feminine<br /> persons ought to study the needs and necessities weekly, now offers a competition for a “storyette.”<br /> of those who work for them.<br /> W. B. The final rule asserts that the editor “reserves<br /> the right to use any story sent in for competition<br /> that does not win a prize, as well as the prize-<br /> III.-—“ Young&quot; FICTION WRITERS AND THE winner&#039;s.&quot;<br /> WAR FUND.<br /> Surely the least that can be done with rejected<br /> Would you allow me through your columns to MSS. is to destroy them, and that any decent<br /> thank those ladies and gentlemen who replied to editor should regard them as serviceable free<br /> my letter (re the above heading) in the May “copy” is as unscrupulous a mode of business<br /> number? A large number of contributions to as any other method of obtaining goods without<br /> the proposed volume have now come in-many payment, I venture to think.<br /> from well-known writers. Miss W. M. Willis-<br /> Swan is kindly assisting me in the compilation<br /> of the volume, and together we hope to bring it<br /> to a successful issue. I should like all the<br /> BOOK AND PLAY TALK.<br /> contributors to understand that if the scheme<br /> eventually falls through, their MS. will be duly<br /> T ORD ROSEBERY has been engaged for<br /> returned to them; but the difficulties in our way<br /> some time on a study of Napoleon during<br /> may necessitate the retention of the contributions<br /> the closing years of his life at St. Helena.<br /> for some length of time.<br /> The result is a volume to be published shortly,<br /> Oct. 5, 1900. James BAGNALL-STUBBS. entitled “ Napoleon : The Last Phase.&quot; In one<br /> of the sixteen chapters Lord Rosebery reviews<br /> all the important books on the history of Bona-<br /> IV.-Fact versus Fiction.<br /> parte.<br /> The fiction of Ouida has in its time held me Among the new books about to be issued from<br /> spell-bound, and though the popularity of hosts the Oxford University Press are “ The Oxford<br /> of modern novels have thrust her particular merits Book of English Verse, 1250-1900,&quot; poems chosen<br /> aside. the author of “Held in Bondage &quot; can and edited by A. T. Quiller-Couch, in two sizes,<br /> still arrest and compel attention. Her romantic one edition being on Oxford India paper; “ An<br /> Aights, her byways of adventure in the fields of English Miscellany,&quot; presented to Dr. Furnivall<br /> the novelist, her compact plots, her ideal heroes, in honour of his seventy-fifth birthday, and con-<br /> the charm of her descriptions, and, above all, her tributed to by some fifty authorities in this<br /> musical and rich rhetoric--all can still delight country and abroad on philology and early<br /> and entertain the present generation. Unfortu. English literature; and “Studies in Foreign<br /> nately, however, this authoress, in a passage in Literature,” being the Taylorian lectures, 1889-<br /> her “Critical Studies,” has—inadvertently, I hope 1899, delivered by S. Mallarmé, W. Pater, W. P.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 109 (#149) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> [09<br /> Ker, H. Brown, A. Morel Fatio, E. Dowden,<br /> F. W. Rolleston, W. M. Rossetti, P. Bourget,<br /> C. H. Herford, and H. Butler Clarke. The same<br /> publishers have issued a charming pocket edition<br /> of the early poems of Alfred Tennyson, set in very<br /> clear type which is easy to read. All lovers of<br /> Tennyson will be attracted by the beautiful<br /> manner in which it is got up.<br /> In consequence of the success of Miss Nora<br /> Vynne&#039;s book, “The Priest&#039;s Marriage,” Mr.<br /> Burleigh is trying a new experiment — that of<br /> bringing out a cheap edition at 1s., concurrently<br /> with a further edition of the six-shilling volume.<br /> The cheap edition will be on thin paper, with a<br /> ith a<br /> pa per cover.<br /> From New York comes the intelligence that<br /> Mr. W. D. Howells will take charge of the “ Easy<br /> Chair Department” (an old feature revived) of<br /> Harper&#039;s Magazine, to whose publishers, Harper<br /> and Brothers, he will become literary adviser.<br /> Mr. Howells will also contribute a monthly<br /> article on contemporary literary affairs to the<br /> North American Review.<br /> Mr. Brimley Johnson is just publishing an<br /> illustrated volume of verses for schoolroom and<br /> nursery by Miss Annie Matheson called “ Snow.<br /> flakes and Snowdrops.” The verses of this<br /> collection run through a cycle of “ The Seasons,”<br /> and are illustrated with three sketches by Mr. F.<br /> Carruthers Gould and numerous drawings by<br /> Miss Winifred Hartley.<br /> Sir Theodore Martin&#039;s biography of the late<br /> Lady Martin (Miss Helen Faucit) will be pub-<br /> lished shortly by Messrs. Blackwood, and is likely<br /> to be of singular interest to the theatrical pro-<br /> fession.<br /> Miss Mary F. S. Hervey has completed an<br /> illustrated volume on Holbein&#039;s “ Ambassadors,&quot;<br /> me on Holbein&#039;s &quot; Ambassadors.”<br /> which will be published soon by Messrs. Bell.<br /> Two works which need not be expected for a<br /> year or two are in progress. First, Professor<br /> Dill is engaged on an historical work dealing with<br /> the Flavian and Antonine periods. It will be<br /> published by Messrs. Macmillan. Second, Mrs.<br /> Paget Toynbee is preparing a new edition of the<br /> “ Letters of Horace Walpole,” which will include<br /> a great deal of new correspondence. She appeals<br /> to the possessors of letters to send them, or copies,<br /> to her at Dorney Wood, Buro ham, Bucks. This<br /> edition will be published by the Clarendon<br /> Press.<br /> Mr. Spencer Wilkinson has written, and Mr.<br /> Caton Woodville and Mr. Melton Prior have<br /> illustrated, a popular history of the South African<br /> War, which the Illustrated London News Com.<br /> pany is about to issue<br /> Mrs. Meynell has contributed an introductory<br /> chapter to “The Confessions of St. Augustine,&quot;<br /> which will be published by Mr. Grant Richards in<br /> a few days as the first volume of a new “Religious<br /> Life&quot; series.<br /> A new volume of verse by Mr. Charles Whit-<br /> worth Wynne, entitled “ Songs and Lyrics,&quot; will<br /> be published shortly by Mr. Grant Richards.<br /> Mr. Samuel Gordon has finished his new novel,<br /> which he calls “ Sons of the Covenant.” It is a<br /> study of the main characteristics which have<br /> helped the Jew to his position as a factor in<br /> European society. Messrs. Sands will publish it<br /> in a few days.<br /> Mr. Richard Whiteing&#039;s articles on “ Paris of<br /> To-Day,&quot; which have been appearing in the<br /> Century Magazine, will be published shortly in<br /> volume form by Mr. Murray.<br /> Mr. Henry Spencer Ashbee bequeathed his<br /> valuable collection of books to the British Museum.<br /> The rarest things in it are the French books<br /> printed in small editions for the members of<br /> several short-lived “bibliopbile” clubs. Mr.<br /> Ashbee, who died at Hawkhurst, Kent, three<br /> months ago, was a wealthy City man for whom<br /> book-collecting was a hobby. Many of the<br /> beautiful French books had been specially<br /> illustrated for him by eminent French book<br /> artists.<br /> An account of Abyssinia by Mr. A. B. Wylde,<br /> who knows the country at first hand, will be pub-<br /> lished by Messrs. Methuen.<br /> lished by Messrs<br /> Mr. Joseph Conrad and Mr. Ford Madox<br /> Hueffer are joint authors of a novel entitled “The<br /> Inheritors,” which Mr. Heinemann is to publish.<br /> Mr. J. Ashby Sterry is publishing through<br /> Messrs. Sands à volume containing thirty of<br /> his papers on all kinds of topics. It will be<br /> called “The Bystander ; or, Leaves for the<br /> Lazy,<br /> Miss L. E. Tiddeman is about to publish<br /> “Celia&#039;s Conquest” (Chambers, 28. 6d.); “The<br /> Apple of His Eye” (Jarrold, 18. 6d.); and<br /> “Seeing is Believing” (Nister, 9d.)<br /> Naunton Davies, author of “ Chester Cress-<br /> well ” and otber novels, has written a comedy<br /> entitled “ Foiled,” which has already been pro-<br /> duced at Llandilo with success. “Foiled” will<br /> be acted in Cardiff in December, and will, it is<br /> hoped, later be produced in London.<br /> An interesting series of articles is at present<br /> appearing in the Genealogical Magazine, on the<br /> Royal Descents, and in the recent numbers an<br /> attempt has been made to trace out the whole of<br /> the living descendants of Mary, Queen Consort of<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 110 (#150) ############################################<br /> <br /> 110<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> France, and Duchess of Suffolk, the younger<br /> daughter of King Henry VII. Royal Descents<br /> in this country are not uncommon, but nearly all<br /> well-known ones are traced from the Plantagenet<br /> kings, and a descent from the Princess Mary is<br /> seldom put forward. Patience and care, however,<br /> demonstrate that the descendants of this princess<br /> must be numbered by hundreds. Already No. 300<br /> has been passed, although little more than one-<br /> twentieth part of the various lines of descent have<br /> been followed up. Amongst those whose names<br /> have been included up to the present are:<br /> Baroness Kinloss, the heir of line and first in<br /> seniority, Earl Temple, the Duke of Buccleuch,<br /> Lord Dalkeith, Lord Montagu of Beaulieu, the<br /> Marchioness of Lothian, Lord Jedburgh, Lady<br /> Cameron of Lochiel, Lady Mary Trefusis, the<br /> Earl of Courtown, Lord Stopford, Lady Mary<br /> Shelley, Lady Grace Bridges, Lady Lily Conyng-<br /> ham Greene, Col. J. F. Cust, Lady Hampson, the<br /> Earl of Romney, Lady Florence Hare, and many<br /> other well-known people.<br /> The Spectator in a recent number discusses the<br /> fitness of authors to be politicians, and sums up<br /> the question as follows :-<br /> The modern novelist, in short, is ex hypothesi omniscient;<br /> baving largely usurped the function of the dramatist, the<br /> preacher, tbe pamphleteer, and the historian, he is bound to<br /> krow a good deal about everything, from metaphysics and<br /> the higher criticism to the manufacture of tin-tacks or the<br /> method of pilchard fishing. Take the question of the<br /> bousing of the poor, and where could you find a better<br /> expert than Mr. Artbur Morrison ? Or if agricultural<br /> de pression were the theme of discussion, who would be<br /> better fitted to serve on a committee than Mr. Rider<br /> Haggard ? Outside the ranks of trained engineers, wbo<br /> would be better equipped to assist the inquiry into the<br /> efficiency of machinery-say, water-tube boilers—than Mr.<br /> Kipling? Lastly, for sane, stimulating, and businesslike<br /> criticism of our military system, where can we look, even<br /> among Service membere, for a better and sounder critic tban<br /> Dr. Conan Doyle? We are very far from contending that the<br /> ability to produce a popular novel is a guarantee of Parlia<br /> mentary capacity. But we assert without fear of con.<br /> tradiction tbat the preparation involved in the writing of a<br /> seriods novel dealing with tbe social problems of the bour<br /> constitutes a far better claim to the confidence of the<br /> electorate than the equipment of the company promoter or<br /> the professional politician.<br /> Mr. George Grossmith, jun., and Mr. Yorke<br /> Stephens have written a comic opera, “ The Gay<br /> Pretenders,” which will be produced at the Globe<br /> Theatre on Nov. 10. The music is by Mr. Claude<br /> Nugent.<br /> When the run of “For Auld Lang Syne&quot; is<br /> terminated, Mr. Henry Hamilton&#039;s version of<br /> “The Three Musketeers” will be produced at<br /> the Lyceum by Mr. Mollison, with Mr. Lewis<br /> Waller in his old part of D&#039;Artagnan. Mr.<br /> Waller will subsequently appear in a revival of<br /> “King Henry V.” at the same theatre.<br /> During Mr. F. R. Benson&#039;s Shakespearian<br /> season at the Comedy eight plays will be produced<br /> (including “Coriolanus &quot;), a fortnight being<br /> given to each. The season lasts from Dec. 19 to<br /> April 8.<br /> Sir Henry Irving, in opening the new Grand<br /> Tneatre and Opera House at Woolwich on Oct. 18,<br /> remarked that a well-conducted theatre was a<br /> necessary adjunct to true civic life. Public<br /> opinion in regard to the stage was governed on<br /> the whole, he believed, by a robust common sense<br /> which rejected the notion that the theatre, if<br /> allowed to exist at all, should be a place where<br /> human nature must not be exhibited.<br /> “Patience” is to be revived at the Savoy on<br /> Nor. 7, and will be played until the new comic<br /> opera by Sir Arthur Sullivan and Mr. Basil Hood<br /> is ready.<br /> Mr. Hermann Vezin was entertained at dinner<br /> by the Pen and Pencil Club of Glasgow on the<br /> occasion of his jubilee as an actor. Lord<br /> Provost Chisholm presided.<br /> Mr. Savile Clarke&#039;s adaptation of &quot; Alice<br /> in Wonderland,” with music by Mr. Walter<br /> Slaughter, will be revived at the Vaudeville<br /> Theatre about the beginning of December.<br /> Mrs. W. K. Clifford&#039;s play, “The Likeness of<br /> the Night,” was successfully produced at the<br /> Royal Court Theatre, Liverpool, on Oct. 18 by<br /> Mr. and Mrs. Kendal.<br /> Mr. R. C. Carton, in an interview which<br /> appears in Cassell&#039;s Saturday Journal for Oct. 10,<br /> niakes the following statement in reply to the<br /> question “Is the aspiring author boycotted by<br /> managers ??<br /> I strongly resent the folly that is talked about the diffi-<br /> culties a young writer experiences in securing a hearing. It<br /> has always been a struggle to succeed at first, and it always<br /> will be ; but in these days it is so obviously to the advan-<br /> tage of the managers to break up the limited area of<br /> dramatic writing that they are very keenly on the lookout<br /> for anything that is worth having. The trouble is that<br /> there is so much competition that managers have to make<br /> their arrangements ahead, and, as you can perceive for<br /> yourself, they can&#039;t very well trust entirely to untried<br /> authors. They go to the tried man because tbey feel more<br /> safe in so doing. If an individaal&#039;s leg is to be taken off,<br /> be engages, if he can afford to do so, the best and most<br /> expensive surgeon, even though others might perform the<br /> operation equally well, and certainly at a cheaper price.<br /> What he wants is to minimise risk. Therefore he tries to<br /> pat the handcuffs on Fate.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 111 (#151) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> III<br /> BOOKS AND REVIEWS.<br /> (In these columns notes on books are given from reviews<br /> which carry weight, and are not, so far as can be learned,<br /> logrollers.)<br /> Among the books issued in October were: LIFE AND<br /> LETTERS OF THOMAS HENRY HUXLEY, by his son Leonard<br /> Huxley (Macmillan, 308. net); MEMOIRS AND CORRE.<br /> SPONDENCE OF COVENTRY PATMORE, by Basil Champneys<br /> (Bell, 328. net); and OLIVER CROMWELL, by John Morley<br /> (Macmillan, 108. net).<br /> THE GREAT BOER WAR, by A. Conan Doyle (Smith,<br /> Elder, 78. 6d.), reviews the whole course of the war. The<br /> Daily Chronicle says that “Dr. Conan Doyle has written<br /> about as satisfactory and sound a book as one could imagine<br /> on a subject so recent, so vital, and so distracted with<br /> controversy.&quot; The narrative is told &quot; always in vigorous,<br /> often in stirring, language,&quot; says the Times; while the<br /> Daily News pronounces the book &quot; a masterly performance.&quot;<br /> “He tells his story,&quot; says the Daily Telegraph, “ in vivid<br /> chapters which make the pulse of the reader beat faster as<br /> he reads.&#039;<br /> IAN HAMILTON&#039;S MARCH, by Winston Churchill (Long.<br /> mans, 68.), is a narrative of the marching and fighting done<br /> by General Ian Hamilton&#039;s column after it moved out of<br /> Bloemfontein on April 22. “Mr. Churchill&#039;s writing is<br /> highly inspiriting,” says the Spectator, which also speaks of<br /> “the great picture which he unrolls before us” in this<br /> book. - This is Mr. Churchill&#039;s strength,” says the Daily<br /> Chronicle, “ that he recognises the interest of his subject to<br /> be sufficient, and is content simply and clearly to set it in<br /> array before yon.” “Of the complicated operations he gives<br /> an excellent description,” says the Daily Telegraph, &quot;and<br /> supplements his tactical explanations by some very good<br /> sketch maps.”<br /> THE SIEGE OF MAFEKING, by Angus Hamilton (Methuen,<br /> 68.), “is another in Messrs. Methuen&#039;s excellent series of<br /> books dealing with special events and periods of the war,<br /> and it is likely,&quot; says the Daily Chronicle, “to be as<br /> popular as the rest.&quot; For the most part the story Mr.<br /> Hamilton tells is a record of what he himself saw and<br /> endured. “The hard prosaic features of the fight, the<br /> endless tedium of waiting for relief, and the monotony of<br /> semi-starvation, with a hundred minor points of life in a<br /> besieged town which are apt to be forgotten in the glamour<br /> of ultimate success, are presented forcibly to us,” says the<br /> Daily Telegraph, &quot; in this picturesque and truthful record.”<br /> How WE ESCAPED FROM PRETORIA, by Captain Aylmer<br /> Haldane (Blackwood, 18.), tells of a feat which, says the<br /> Spectator, &quot; is among the most brilliant exploits of the war.”<br /> “And after the unfailing courage of the three determined<br /> to escape, that which is pleasantest in this amazing narrative<br /> is the unselfish and never failing loyalty of those who helped<br /> their companions on the road to liberty.&quot;<br /> TOMMY AND GRIZEL, by J. M. Barrie (Cassell, 68.), “ is a<br /> delightful book,&quot; says the Daily News, &quot; full of its author&#039;s<br /> nameless charm-his elusive and ethereal humour.” “It is<br /> a book of extraordinary power and even of extraordinary<br /> beauty,&quot; says the Daily Chronicle,&quot; the work of a poet and<br /> a psychologist born and bred.” Grizel, says the Times, is<br /> “as true and lovable a woman as novelist ever created.&quot;<br /> QUISANTÉ, by Anthony Hope (Methuen, 68.) &quot; is a study,&quot;<br /> says the Daily News, “worthy of one of the most brilliant<br /> of our living novelists.” “The story does not, in Mr.<br /> Hope&#039;s earlier manner, flit pleasantly along the surface of<br /> things, but planges rather into the depths, into complex<br /> feelings and emotions.&quot; The principal figure in the book is<br /> a successful politician. The Daily Chronicle pronounces it<br /> “ Anthony Hope&#039;s best.” The Spectator describes the<br /> story as “the apotheosis of the brilliant oad.” “Mr. Hope<br /> is never dull,” says the Times ; &quot;his electioneering is the<br /> very thing, and his minor people... are quite de-<br /> lightful.”<br /> THE LANE THAT HAD NO TURNING, by Gilbert Parker<br /> (Heinemann, 68 ) &quot; deals mainly,” says the Daily News,<br /> “with his favourite and happy hunting-ground of French<br /> Canada, Pontiac, the idyllic Pontiac, the well-beloved<br /> Seigneury, with an accompaniment of those charming rustics<br /> and village characters so well-known already to this author&#039;s<br /> readers. The first story in the volume is a really<br /> masterly piece of work, a dramatic plot excellently well<br /> imagined and carried out.” “Not even in &quot;The Seats of<br /> the Mighty,&#039;” says the Times, “ does Mr. Parker suggest<br /> such an impression of his strength as in the most important<br /> of these stories ... the other stories are slighter and<br /> less ambitious, but scarcely less impressive.”<br /> OLD FIRES AND PROFITABLE GHosts, by A. T. Qailler-<br /> Couch (Cassell, 68.) is praised by the Daily Chronicle for<br /> its purpose and workmanship. &quot;A careless estimate might<br /> call it &amp; volume of ghost stories, but as that phrase is<br /> popularly accepted, it falls quite short of a description.”<br /> &quot;Mr. Couch&#039;s method is largely his own, and his toach is so<br /> simple and direct as to divest the other side of death of<br /> almost everything that is terrible, and to present it in a<br /> relation to life amenable, humane and helpful.” “Without<br /> exactly making one&#039;s flesh creep,” says the Daily News,<br /> “these stories produce a delightful yet ancanny effect of<br /> magic and of the incomprehensible.&quot;<br /> JOSEPH GLANVILL: A Study in English Thought and<br /> Letters of the Seventeenth Century, by Ferris Greenslet<br /> (Macmillan, 6s.) tells us, says the spectator, “all of Glan-<br /> vill which it is possible to know, and that is not very much.<br /> Of few English writers of equal power do we know so little.<br /> But Dr. Greenslet has done something more asefal than<br /> gossip about a dead author; he has related him to the<br /> general intellectual movement of the time, and has there.<br /> fore written a valuable chapter in the history of English<br /> philosophic thought.” The Daily Chronicle calls it “a<br /> creditable and interesting book, which is specially deserving<br /> of readers to-day, when the Cambridge Platonists are in<br /> greater vogue than they have ever been since the publica-<br /> tion of &#039;John Inglesant.&#039;”.<br /> THE STORY OF FLORENCE, by Edmund G. Gardner<br /> (Dent, 48. 6d. net.), “is not only a history,&quot; says the<br /> Spectator, “but a guide which every tourist should take<br /> with him to Florence ... for it will bring succinctly<br /> under his survey the crowded and glorious history of<br /> Florence, and will show the conditions under which her<br /> literature and art were evolved.” “Mr. Gardner has done<br /> wisely,” says the Daily Chronicle, &quot; in confining himself to<br /> an account of the most salient events and the most striking<br /> personalities.” .<br /> THE MEN OF THE MERCHANT SERVICE, by Frank T.<br /> Ballon (Smith, Elder, 78. 6d.), is described in the sub-title<br /> as “ being the polity of the Mercantile Marine for Long.<br /> shore Readers.&quot; Mr. Arnold White, reviewing it in the Daily<br /> Chronicle, declares that “ Mr. Bullen has done good national<br /> service in writing this book,&quot; and that “ he<br /> whose experience has burnt into his soul the realities of sea<br /> life on a British merchant ship.” The Globe remarks that<br /> “it is not often that a work so thoroughly practical is put<br /> before the public.&quot;<br /> JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN, the Man and the Statesman, by<br /> N. Murrell Marris (Hutchinson, 108. net), is a “fairly<br /> interesting ” compilation, says Literature. “It is not, and<br /> does not claim to be, critical.” Miss Marris acknowledges<br /> man<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 112 (#152) ############################################<br /> <br /> I 12<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> in her preface the aid which she bas received from the<br /> Chamberlain family, and, says the Daily Chronicle, “this<br /> elaborate study of the present Secretary of State for the<br /> Colonies has all the accuracy and personal interest which<br /> might be expected in the circumstances. “The book will<br /> serve a useful purpose, although,&quot; says the Daily News, “it<br /> cannot fail to be treated as controversial by those who<br /> cannot accept the exaltation of Mr. Chamberlain&#039;s colonial<br /> policy.”<br /> THIRTEEN STORIES, by R. B. Cunninghame Graham<br /> (Heinemann, 6s.), are described by the author as “sketches,<br /> stories, studies, or what you call them,” and the Daily<br /> Chronicle, after giving a few quotations to show the spirit<br /> of the book, says tbat“ po patoby quotations can do justice<br /> to its proud and fastidious rebellion against the common-<br /> place.&quot; Literature describes&quot; Rothenberger&#039;s Wedding ” as<br /> an amusing satiric sketch, “ La Clemenza de Tito&quot; a well.<br /> observed study,&quot; but among the lesser stories of the thirteen<br /> we like best the account of how Amarabat, the runner, failed<br /> to take &#039;The Gold Fish&#039; from Rabat to the Sultan at Tafileh.<br /> This has the true fatalistio note of the East and is told with<br /> exquisite skill.”<br /> CUNNING MURRELL, by Arthur Morrison (Methuen, 68.)<br /> -Literature says of this book : “Hadleigh and its neigh-<br /> boarhood had at the time of the story overlooked the<br /> passage of time and still held to the ideas of an earlier<br /> period. Thas Cunding Murrell could exercise those queer<br /> arts of his which awed the simple country folk. He himself<br /> believed in his occult powers. . . . He puts apon<br /> Dorrily Thorn&#039;s aunt, Mrs. Martin, the stigma of witchcraft.<br /> In discovering how this tragedy works out the reader will<br /> have perused &amp; very successful and interesting example of<br /> the modern novel.”<br /> THE BRASS BOTTLE, by F. Anstey (Smith, Elder, 68.).—<br /> “In his logical conduct of an absurd proposition, in his<br /> fantastic handling of the supernatural, in his brisk dialogue<br /> and effective characterisation, Mr. Anstey,” says the Spec.<br /> tator, “ has once more shown himself to be an artist and a<br /> hamourist of uncommon and enviable merit.&quot; Blackwood&#039;s<br /> Magazine says &quot; Mr. Anstey ban not written anything in<br /> better heart or in higher spirits since he presented a<br /> delighted public with Mr. Baltitude.”<br /> MOTHER-SISTER, by Edwin Pugh (Hurst and Blackett,<br /> 68.).—“Mr. Pugh studies poor-life as Mr. Morrison and Mr.<br /> Pett Ridge study it,” says the Daily Chronicle,&quot; and he<br /> distinctly deserves to be in the same olass with them. This<br /> is a somewbat new thing, this humorous study of poverty ;<br /> it has great uses ; it presents pathos without mawkishness,<br /> and makes us feel none the less the need for pity.”<br /> THE NEW ORDER, by Oswald Crawfurd (Richards, 68.).<br /> _“The argument,” says the Times, “is that although there<br /> may be wealth in free trade, it would be cheaper in the end<br /> to revive agricultural prosperity as a guarantee against an<br /> international blockade. There is a great deal of good argu-<br /> ment and sound sense in the book.” “Mr. Crawfurd&#039;s<br /> heroes are no effeminate dreamers, they are all athletes and<br /> emphatically men of action.”<br /> THE INFIDEL, by M. E. Braddon (Simpkin, 68.), is a tale<br /> of George II.&#039;s day, the heroine of which &quot; is the daaghter<br /> by an Italian mother of an anfrocked priest, a hireling Grub<br /> Street scribe, who has imbued her with his own Voltairean<br /> scepticism, but failed to impair the inherent nobility of her<br /> character.” The story is admirably &quot;staged,&quot; says the<br /> Spectator, and wiss Braddon&#039;s style &quot;leaves nothing to be<br /> desired in terseness and lucidity.” “The old ability,&quot; says<br /> the Daily Chronicle, &quot; to set forth, with a richness of<br /> cursory information surpassed by no writer of fiction,<br /> apparently any story in any period, is still in evidence.”<br /> WINEFRED, by S. Baring-Gould (Methaen, 68.), “is a<br /> capital story,&quot; says the Times, “ full as usual of violent<br /> sensations, admirable in its vivid descriptions of the cliff<br /> scenery, and with more humour than most of its pre-<br /> decessors.&quot;<br /> SERVANTS OF Sin, by J. Bloundelle-Burton (Methuen,<br /> 68.), “ amply justifies its title,&quot; observes the Times. The<br /> date of the story is the Regency during the minority of<br /> Louis XV. “We are introduced to the most villainous<br /> society imaginable. Mr. Bloondelle-Barton takes a less<br /> lenient view of the Regent Orleans than Dumas, and he has<br /> depicted the reign of the roués in the most larid colours.<br /> It is a capital story nevertheless.” The Spectator says that<br /> “ by readers who like the costume-romance&#039; it will be pro-<br /> nounced a very good specimen of this class of novel.”<br /> THE COURTESY DAME, by R. Marray Gilchrist (Heine-<br /> mann, 68.), is “decidedly good reading,” says the Daily<br /> Telegraph. Mr. Gilchrist, says the Daily Chronicle, “ still<br /> keeps as in and about the Peakland district of Derbyshire,<br /> with which and with whose inhabitants he bas already made<br /> us so familiar.” “This time we are introduced to a rather<br /> loftier level than usual. “The Coartesy Dame&#039; is a well-<br /> written and interesting novel.”<br /> LIFE OF SIR JOHN FOWLER, by Thomas Mackay<br /> (Murray, 168.).--&quot;Of a life so full of interesting and im<br /> portant action,” says the Daily Chronicle, “this memoir,<br /> excellent as it is, is only too short.” “The life of a great<br /> engineer,” says the Daily News, “ cannot be expected to be<br /> rich in romantic and picturesque incident, but Mr. Mackay<br /> has at least furnished in a sober and business-like style<br /> abundance of interesting details.&quot;<br /> FIRST FRENCH BOOK FOR CHILDREN, by Professor<br /> Victor Spiers (Simpkin, 28. 6d. or 38.), “has the ad.<br /> vantage,” says the Educational Times, “ of being written<br /> directly for English children, and not adapted from the<br /> German.” “Professor Spiers,&quot; says the Journal of Education,<br /> “who has long been known as one of the most successful<br /> teachers of higher French, bas here attempted the humbler,<br /> but harder, part of nursery governess. Nursery rhymes for<br /> repetition, music, simple conversations, and pictures galore<br /> --all these combine to make a most attractive book.” The<br /> Daily Chronicle observes that “if modern teaching is to be<br /> effective, the reform must begin with the very foundations,&quot;<br /> and adds that the book &quot;may prove a golden bridge from<br /> the old grammar drill and construing book to the new<br /> rational method.” The Guardian approves of the book<br /> with its “ minimum of grammar and tedious rules,&quot; and its<br /> abundance of “wise advice to teachers.” “ It is,” it adds,<br /> “a most interesting experiment in text-book construction,<br /> and we trust it may be tried.”<br /> E AUTHOR.&quot;<br /> SCALE FOR ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> •<br /> •<br /> •<br /> •<br /> •<br /> •<br /> Front Page<br /> ... ... £4 0 0<br /> Other Pages<br /> ... ... 3 0 0<br /> Hall of a Page ...<br /> ... ... 1 10 0<br /> Quarter of a Page<br /> ... 015 0<br /> Eighth of a Page<br /> ... 0 7 6<br /> Single Column Advertisements<br /> per inch 0 6 0<br /> Bills for Insertion ... ...<br /> ... per 2000 3 00<br /> Reductions made for a Series of six or Twelve Insertions.<br /> All letters respecting Advertisements should be addressed to the<br /> ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER, The Author Office, 4, Portugal-street<br /> London, W.O.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 112 (#153) ############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> TELLTERARY AGENCJA<br /> SALE OF MSS. 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HAYNES<br /> (ROYAL ENGINEERS).<br /> WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> * The story of the vigorous efforts made, against terrible odds, to<br /> find the missing Professor and his companions is clearly and ably<br /> set forth. Then comes the finding of the ghastly remains and the<br /> patiently relentless following up of clues in tracing out the various<br /> Arabs implicated in the murder. The adventurous part of the book<br /> is as interesting as a tale by Stevenson; nor is what might be termed<br /> the personal part less absorbing.&quot;-Publishers&#039; Circular.<br /> Demy 8vo., cloth boards, price 109. 6d.<br /> IN NEW SOUTH AFRICA.<br /> Travels in the Transvaal and Rhodesia.<br /> With Map and Twenty-six Illustrations.<br /> By H. LINCOLN TANGYE.<br /> London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.C.<br /> Crown 8vo., Cloth Boards, Silver Lettering, Price 6s.<br /> A LADY OF WALES.<br /> CONTENTS.<br /> Introductory.<br /> PART I.<br /> CHAPTER I.-The Land of Gold and the Way there.<br /> II.-Across Desert and Veldt.<br /> III.-- Johannesburg the Golden.<br /> IV.-A Transvaal Coach Journey.<br /> V.-Natal: the South African Garden.<br /> 1.-Ostracised in Africa. Home with the Swallows.<br /> &quot;A Story of the Siege of Chester, 1645.&quot;<br /> Rev. VINCENT J. LEATHERDALE, M.A.<br /> BY THE<br /> PART II.-RAMBLES IN RHODESIA,<br /> CHAPTER I.-Eendragt Maakt Magt.<br /> II.-Into the Country of Lobengula.<br /> III.-The Trail of War.<br /> IV.-Goldmining, Ancient and Modern,<br /> , V.-Sic Transit Gloria Mundi.<br /> VI.-To Northern Mashonaland.<br /> VII.-Primitive Art. The Misadventures of a Wagon.<br /> Index.<br /> London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.C.<br /> In demy 8vo., price 12s. net, by post 12s. Bd.<br /> London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.O.<br /> Six Months in a Syrian Monastery.<br /> Crown 8vo., limp cloth, price 2s. 6d.<br /> A HANDBOOK<br /> OF<br /> Being the Record of a Visit to the Headquarters of the Syrian<br /> Church in Mesopotamia, with some account of the Yazidis, or Devil<br /> Worshippers of Mosul, and El Jilwah, their Sacred Book.<br /> By OSWALD H. PARRY, B.A.<br /> (Of Magdalen College, Oxford.)<br /> Illustrated by the Author. With a Prefatory Note by the<br /> Right Reverend the Lord Bishop of Durham.<br /> PROCEDURE<br /> OF THE<br /> HOUSE of COMMONS,<br /> WITH<br /> SUGGESTIONS AND PRECEDENTS<br /> FOR THE USE OF<br /> PARLIAMENTARY DEBATING SOCIETIES,<br /> rds the East.ini nis work is well worth revith the old Syria<br /> The author of this handsome volume presents a detailed study of<br /> a relic of history pursued off the track of general research; he has<br /> sought to give, and has succeeded in giving, a picture of quiet life in<br /> a country much abused, and among a people that command less than<br /> their share of ordinary interest.&#039; . Westward the tide of Enpire takes<br /> its way,&#039; sang &amp; prophetic divine of the olden days, and no less<br /> certainly, as Mr. Parry points out, does the ebb of travel return<br /> towards the East. .. As &amp; volume descriptive of life and travel<br /> among a distant people, his work is well worth reading, but for those<br /> persons who are more particularly concerned with the old Syrian<br /> Church, or in the solution of the problem indicated above, it is one of<br /> quite unique attraction. A pathetic interest attaches to the account<br /> of the Yazidis included in this volume, for it contains part of their<br /> sacred writings, the original manuscript of which was in the hands<br /> of Professor Robertson Smith for translation at the time of his<br /> death.&#039; -Publishers&#039; Circular.<br /> BY<br /> GEO. G. GRAY, Esq.,<br /> LL.D. (Lond.), J.P., Barrister-at-Law, &amp;c., Author of &quot;A Manual of<br /> Bankruptcy,&quot; &amp; Treatise on &quot;The Right to Support from Land and<br /> Buildings,&quot; &amp;c., Speaker of the Hastings Local House of Commons.<br /> London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.C.<br /> London : HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.O<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 112 (#155) ############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> vii<br /> In demy 8vo., with PORTRAITS, price 7s, 6d.<br /> T HE<br /> BUILDERS OF OUR LAW<br /> DURING THE REIGN OF QUEEN VICTORIA.<br /> By EDWARD MANSON.<br /> Late Scholar of Brasenose College, and of the Middle Temple, Barrister-at-Law; Author of the Law of Trading Companies,&quot; &quot; Debentures<br /> and Debenture Stock,&quot; &quot; Dog Law,&quot; &amp;c.<br /> TABLE OF CONTENTS.<br /> Lord Cottenbam.<br /> Lord St. Leonards.<br /> Baron Martin (uith Portrait).<br /> Ohief Justice Tindal.<br /> Chief Baron Pollock.<br /> Sir George Jessel (with Portrait).<br /> Lord Justice Knight Bruce (with Portrait). Sir Cresswell Cresswell.<br /> Sir Robert Phillimore (with Portrait).<br /> Baron Parke-Lord Wensleydale.<br /> Lord Campbell.<br /> Lord Justice Mellish (with Portrait).<br /> Right Honourable Stephen Lushington, the Mr. Justice Patteson (with Portrait).<br /> Lord Justice Lush.<br /> Ohief Justice Jervis.<br /> Lord Westbury (with Portrait).<br /> Lord Blackburn.<br /> Lord Cranworth.<br /> Chief Justice Cockburn (urith Portrait).<br /> Lord Justice James (with Portrait).<br /> Mr. Justice Maule.<br /> Mr. Justice Wightman.<br /> Chief Justice Erle (with Portrait).<br /> Lord Abinger.<br /> Lord Hatherley.<br /> Sir Edward Vaughan Williams.<br /> Lord Truro.<br /> Mr. Justice Willes.<br /> Mr. Justice Crompton.<br /> Baron Alderson.<br /> Lord Bramwell.<br /> Chief Baron Kelly.<br /> Lord Denman (with Portrait).<br /> Lord Cairns (with Portrait).<br /> * Mr. Manson bas à facile pen and a pleasant style; and it would indeed have been a pity had the ephemeral purpose with which the<br /> matter contained in this book was originally published caused these interesting sketches to be forgotten. The aim of the author has been to<br /> give an outline of the career of the greatest of our judges, and to state the effect of their work upon the law, and in so doing he has started at<br /> the point at which Lord Campbell left off. Several old prints are reproduced, and help to make up a handsome, interesting, and even brilliant<br /> addition to the history of the Legal Profession.&quot;-Law Journal.<br /> &quot; We received the several biographies with much pleasure, and gladly published them in these columns. We know for a fact that more<br /> than one family has been surprised at the information gleaned about its judicial member by Mr. Manson. We predict for it a permanent place<br /> in legal biography.&quot;-Law Times.<br /> &quot;The book has a serious interest for laymen as well as for lawyers, for, although there is much of case law, there is no more of it than the<br /> general reader may digest. It is the anecdotes and the personal details which give piquancy to the book.&quot;- Morning.<br /> | SPORTING DAYS<br /> SOUTHERN INDIA:<br /> London: HORACE COX, WINDSOR HOUSE, BREAM&#039;S BUILDINGS, E.Ç.<br /> Demy 8vo., with Map and Illustrations, price 10s. 6d.<br /> Royal 8vo., price 16s. net.<br /> AN AUSTRALIAN<br /> IN<br /> IN CHINA:<br /> Being the Narrative of a Quiet Journey. Across<br /> China to British Burma.<br /> BEING<br /> By G. E. MORRISON, REMINISCENCES OF TWENTY TRIPS IN PURSUIT<br /> M.B.C.M. Edin., F.R.G.S.<br /> OF BIG GAME,<br /> &quot;Mr. Morrison is an Australian doctor who has achieved probably<br /> CHIEFLY IN THE MADRAS PRESIDENCY.<br /> the most remarkable journey through the Flowery Land ever<br /> attempted by a Christian. .. He was entirely unarmed and<br /> BY<br /> unaccompanied, save for the coolies who carried his baggage. Such<br /> a journey-three thousand miles in length-could not fail to present Lieut.-Col. A. J. 0. POLLOCK,<br /> many curious customs and as many curious people. But it is owing<br /> entirely to Dr. Morrison&#039;s graphic manner of description, and his<br /> Royal Scots Fusiliers.<br /> scutely keen observation, that his travels are such a reality to the<br /> reader. This portly volume is one of the most interesting books of<br /> · WITH NUMEROUS ILLUSTRATIONS BY WHYMPER<br /> travel of the many published this year. It is frank, original, and<br /> AND OTHERS.<br /> quite ungarnished by adventitious colouring.&quot;-St. James&#039;s Budget.<br /> &quot;One of the most interesting books of travel we remember to have<br /> read.&quot;-European Mail.<br /> CONTENTS.<br /> &quot;A very lively book of travel. ... His account of the walk<br /> Chapters I., II., and III.-The Bear.<br /> of 1500 miles from Chungking to Burma, over the remotest districts<br /> IV. and V.-The Panther.<br /> of Western China, is full of interest.&quot;- The Times.<br /> VI., VII., and VIII.-The Tiger.<br /> * Dr. Morrison writes crisply, sensibly, humorously, and with an<br /> engaging frankness. ... There is not a page he has written that<br /> IX. and X.-The Indian Bison.<br /> is not worth the perusal of the student of China and the Chinese.&quot;-<br /> XI. and XII.-The Elephant.<br /> The Scotsman.<br /> XIII.-Deer (Cervidae) and Antelopes.<br /> * By far the most interesting and entertaining narrative of travel<br /> XIV.-The Ibex.<br /> in the Flowery Land that has appeared for several years.&quot;- The<br /> World.<br /> XV. and XVI.-Miscellaneous.<br /> London : HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.O. I London : HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.C.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 112 (#156) ############################################<br /> <br /> viii<br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> <br /> ZT HAS NEVER BEEN SERIOUSLY QUES-<br /> TIONED BY ANY HONEST TYPEWRITER<br /> INVENTOR, MECHANICAL EXPERT, OR<br /> USER THAT THE FUNDAMENTAL LINES<br /> UPON WHICH THE SMITH PREMIER IS BUILT<br /> ARE FAR IN ADVANCE OF ANY OTHER TYPE-<br /> WRITER. THAT ALONE WOULD NOT MERIT<br /> SUCCESS, BUT THAT FOUNDATION TOGETHER<br /> WITH BEST MATERIAL, BEST WORKMANSHIP,<br /> AND EXPERT INSPECTION<br /> OF ALL THE PARTS AS<br /> WELL AS THE FINISHED<br /> PRODUCT, HAVE CAUSED<br /> THE SMITH PREMIER TO<br /> WIN. 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337https://historysoa.com/items/show/337The Author, Vol. 11 Issue 07 (December 1900)<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=49&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=%3Cem%3EThe+Author%3C%2Fem%3E%2C+Vol.+11+Issue+07+%28December+1900%29"><em>The Author</em>, Vol. 11 Issue 07 (December 1900)</a><a href="https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390" target="_blank" rel="noopener">https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015006979390</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=51&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=Publication">Publication</a>1900-12-01-The-Author-11-7<a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=76&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=1900-12-01">1900-12-01</a><a href="/items/browse?advanced%5B0%5D%5Belement_id%5D=89&advanced%5B0%5D%5Btype%5D=is+exactly&advanced%5B0%5D%5Bterms%5D=11">11</a>7113–13219001201Tbea Author.<br /> (The Organ of the Incorporated Society of Authors. Monthly.)<br /> CONDUCTED BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> Vol. XI.—No. 7.]<br /> DECEMBER 1, 1900.<br /> (PRICE SIXPENCE.<br /> -<br /> CONTENTS.<br /> PAGE<br /> ... 113<br /> PAGE<br /> ... 125<br /> ...<br /> ...<br /> ...<br /> ... 126<br /> Memoranda ... ... ... ... ... ... ...<br /> Literary Property-<br /> 1. The Publisher and the Agent<br /> 2. Dramatic Copyright-Lord Monkswell&#039;s Bill ...<br /> 3. Publishers as Agents<br /> Legalised Artistic Robbery... ...<br /> Paris Letter. By Darracotte Scott<br /> Notes and News. By the Editor...<br /> ... 114<br /> ... 117<br /> ... 117<br /> 118<br /> Revivals and Reprints ... ...<br /> Use of the Society&#039;s Name...<br /> Certain Literary Speeches... ... ... ...<br /> Of Editors ... ... ... ...<br /> Authors&#039; Club Dinners<br /> Book and Play Talk...<br /> ray TUIR... ... ...<br /> Correspondence-1, Wanted, a Reference. 2. A<br /> 3. Mr. Sydney Grundy on the New Bill ...<br /> 120<br /> 122<br /> Just Protest.<br /> ... ... ... 131<br /> PUBLICATIONS OF THE SOCIETY.<br /> 1. The Annual Report. That for the past year can be had on application to the Secretary.<br /> 2. The Author. A Monthly Journal devoted especially to the protection and maintenance of Literary<br /> Property. Issued to all Members, 6s. 6d. per annum. Back numbers are offered at the<br /> following prices : Vol. I., 108. 6d. (Bound); Vols. II., III., and IV., 88. 6d. each (Bound);<br /> Vols. V. to VIII. (Unbound), 6s. 6d.<br /> 3. Literature and the Pension List. By W. MORRIS COLLES, Barrister-at-Law. Henry Glaisher,<br /> 95, Strand, W.C. 38.<br /> 4. The History of the Société des Gens de Lettres. By S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE, late Secretary to<br /> the Society. Is.<br /> 5. The cost of Production. In this work specimens are given of the most important forms of type,<br /> size of page, &amp;c., with estimates showing what it costs to produce the more common kinds of<br /> books. Henry Glaisher, 95, Strand, W.C. 28. 6d. (Out of print at present.)<br /> 6. The Various Methods of Publication. By S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE. In this work, compiled from the<br /> papers in the Society&#039;s offices, the various forms of agreements proposed by Publishers to<br /> Authors are examined, and their meaning carefully explained, with an account of the various<br /> kinds of fraud which have been made possible by the different clauses in their agreements.<br /> Henry Glaisher, 95, Strand, W.C. 38.<br /> 7. Copyright Law Reform. An Exposition of Lord Monkswell&#039;s Copyright Bill of 1890. With<br /> Extracts from the Report of the Commission of 1878, and an Appendix containing the<br /> Berne Convention and the American Copyright Bill. By J. M. LELY. Eyre and Spottis-<br /> woode. Is. 6d.<br /> 8. The Society of Authors. A Record of its Action from its Foundation. By WALTER BESANT<br /> (Chairman of Committee, 1888–1892). 1S.<br /> 9. The Contract of Publication in Germany, Austria, Hungary, and Switzerland. By Ernst<br /> LUNGE, J.U.D. 28. 6d.<br /> 10. The Addenda to the “Methods of Publishing.&quot; By G. HERBERT THRIng. Being additional<br /> facts collected at the office of the Society since the publication of the “Methods.&quot; With<br /> comments and advice. 28.<br /> 11. Forms of Agreement issued by the Publishers&#039; Association ; with Comments. By G. HERBERT<br /> TARING, and Illustrative Examples by Sir WALTER BESANT. 18.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 112 (#158) ############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> The Society of Nuthors (Incorporated).<br /> PRESIDENT.<br /> GEORGE MEREDITH.<br /> COUNCIL<br /> SIR EDWIN ARNOLD, K.C.I.E., C.S.I. | AUSTIN Dobson.<br /> SIR LEWIS MORRIS.<br /> J. M. BARRIE.<br /> A. CONAN DOYLE, M.D.<br /> HENRY NORMAN, M.P.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> A. W. DUBOURG.<br /> Miss E. A. ORMEROD, LL.D.<br /> ROBERT BATEMAN.<br /> SIR MICHAEL FOSTER, K.C.B., F.R.S. GILBERT PARKER, M.P.<br /> F. E. BEDDARD, F.R.S.<br /> D. W. FRESHFIELD.<br /> J. C. PARKINSON.<br /> SIR HENRY BERGNE, K.C.M.G.<br /> RICHARD GARNETT, C.B., LL.D.<br /> A. W. PINERO.<br /> SIR WALTER BESANT.<br /> EDMUND GOSSE.<br /> THE RIGHT HON. THE LORD PIR-<br /> AUGUSTINE BIRRELL, Q.C.<br /> H. RIDER HAGGARD.<br /> BRIGHT, F.R.S.<br /> THE REV. PROF. BONNEY, F.R.S. THOMAS HARDY.<br /> Sir FREDERICK POLLOCK, Bart., LL.D.<br /> THE RIGHT Hon. JAMES BRYCE, M.P. ANTHONY HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> WALTER HERRIES POLLOCK.<br /> THE RIGHT HON. THE LORD BURGH. JEROME K. JEROME.<br /> E. ROSE.<br /> CLERE.<br /> J. SCOTT KELTIE, LL.D.<br /> W. BAPTISTE SCOONES.<br /> HALL CAINE.<br /> RUDYARD KIPLING.<br /> Miss FLORA L. SHAW.<br /> EGERTON CASTLE, F.S.A.<br /> PROF. E. RAY LANKESTER, F.R.S. G. R. SIMS.<br /> P. W. CLAYDEN.<br /> THE Right Hon. W. E. H. LECKY, S. SQUIRE SPRIGGE.<br /> EDWARD CLODD.<br /> M.P.<br /> J. J. STEVENSON.<br /> W. MORRIS COLLES.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> FRANCIS STORR.<br /> THE HON. JOHN COLLIER.<br /> THE REV. W. J. LOFTIE, F.S.A.<br /> WILLIAM Moy THOMAS.<br /> SIR W. MARTIN CONWAY.<br /> Sir A. C. MACKENZIE, Mas.Doc. MRS. HUMPHRY WARD.<br /> F. MARION CRAWFORD.<br /> PROF. J. M. D. MEIKLEJOHN.<br /> Miss CHARLOTTE M. YONGH.<br /> The Right Hon. THE LORD CURZON THE REV. C. H. MIDDLETON-WAKE.<br /> OF KEDLESTON.<br /> Hon. Counsel - E. M. UNDERDOWN, Q.C.<br /> COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT.<br /> Chairman-A. HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> D. W. FRESHFIELD.<br /> GILBERT PARKER, M.P.<br /> SIR WALTER BESANT.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> E. ROSE.<br /> EGERTON CASTLE, F.S.A.<br /> HENRY NORMAN, M.P.<br /> FRANCIS STORR.<br /> A. CONAN DOYLE, M.D.<br /> &#039;SUB-COMMITTEES.&#039;<br /> ART.<br /> Hon. John COLLIER (Chairman). I SIR W. MARTIN Conway.<br /> M. H. SPIELMANN<br /> COPYRIGHT.<br /> A, W. À BECKETT.<br /> A. HOPE HAWKINS.<br /> J. M. LELY.<br /> W. M. COLLES. .<br /> GILBERT PARKER, M.P.<br /> DRAMA.<br /> HENRY ARTHUR JONES (Chairman). I F. C. BURNAND.<br /> A. W. PINERO.<br /> A. W. À BECKETT.<br /> SYDNEY GRUNDY.<br /> EDWARD ROSE.<br /> Solicitors,<br /> FIELD, Roscoe, and Co., Lincoln&#039;s Inn Fields.<br /> G. HERBERT THRING, 4, Portugal-street.<br /> Secretary-G. HERBERT THRING.<br /> OFFICES : 4, PORTUGAL STREET, LINCOLN&#039;s INN FIELDS, W.C.<br /> A. P. WATT &amp; SON,<br /> LITERARY AGENTS,<br /> Formerly of 2, PATERNOSTER SQUARE,<br /> Have now removed to<br /> HASTINGS HOUSE, NORFOLK STREET, STRAND,<br /> LONDON, W.C.<br /> THE KNIGHTS and KINGS of CHESS. By the Rev. | THE ART of CHESS. By JAMES Mason. Price 58.<br /> 1 GA. MACDONNELL, B.A. Price 28. 6d. net.<br /> net, by post 58. 4d<br /> London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;s-buildings, E.C. London: HORACE Cox, Windsor House, Bream&#039;g-buildings, E.C.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 112 (#159) ############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> Now Ready, cloth, bs.; half calf, 7s. Bd.; calf, 8s. Ed.<br /> PATERSON&#039;S PRACTICAL STATUTES 1900<br /> CAP.<br /> (63&#039;&amp; 64 VICTORIA);<br /> WITH INTRODUCTIONS, NOTES, TABLES OF STATUTES REPEALED AND SUBJECTS ALTERED, LISTS<br /> OF LOCAL AND PERSONAL AND PRIVATE ACTS, AND A COPIOUS INDEX.<br /> EDITED BY<br /> JAMES SUTHERLAND COTTON, Barrister-at-Law.<br /> CONTENTS.<br /> Table of Principal Enactments repealed. | CAP.<br /> Table of Principal Subjects altered.<br /> 19. Land Registry (New Buildings) Act [title 40. Elementary School Teachers Superannua-<br /> only).<br /> tion (Jersey) Act ſtille only).<br /> TAP. SESSION 1899—63 VICTORIA. 20. Ecclesiastical Assessments (Scotland) Act 41. Local Government (Ireland) (No. 2) Act<br /> 1. Appropriation Act 1899. Session 2 [title only].<br /> [title only].<br /> [title only].<br /> 2. Treasury Bills Act (tille only).<br /> 21. Mines (Prohibition of Child Labour Under 42. Reserve Forces Act.<br /> 3. Second Session (Explanation) Act.<br /> ground) Act.<br /> 43. Intermediate Education (Ireland) Act<br /> 22. Workmen&#039;s Compensation Act.<br /> [title only).<br /> SESSION 1900—63 &amp; 64 Vict.<br /> 3. Poor Removal Act.<br /> . Exportation of Arms Act.<br /> 1. Consolidated Fund (No. 1) Act [title only]. 24. Veterinary Surgeons Amendment Act. 45. Poor Relief (Ireland) Act [lille only].<br /> 2. War Loan Act (tille only).<br /> 25. Charitable Loan Societies (Ireland) Act 46. Members of Local Authorities Relief Act<br /> 3. Consolidated Fund (No. 2) Act [title only] [title only).<br /> 17. County Courts (Investment) Act.<br /> 4. Census (Great Britain) Act.<br /> 26. Land Charges Act.<br /> 48. Oompanies Act.<br /> 5. Army (Annual) Act.<br /> 27. Railway Employment (Prevention of 49. Town Councils (Scotland) Act (tille only).<br /> 6. Census (Ireland) Act [title only).<br /> Accidents) Act.<br /> 1. Agricultural Holdings Act.<br /> 7. Finance Act.<br /> 28. Inebriates Amendment (Scotland) Act 51. Money. lenders Act.<br /> 8. Electoral Disabilities (Military Service) [title only).<br /> 52. Naval Reserve Act.<br /> Removals Act.<br /> 29. London County Council Electors Qualifi 53. Elementary Education Act.<br /> 9. Police Reservists (Allowances) Act<br /> cation Act.<br /> 54. Lunacy Board (Scotland) Act [title only].<br /> 10. Public Health (Ireland) Act [title only). 30. Beer Retailers&#039; and Spirit Grocers&#039; Retail 55. Executors (Scotland) Act (title only).<br /> 11. Uganda Railway Act (title only).<br /> 56. Military Lands Act.<br /> 12. Commonwealth of Australia Donstitution | 31. Isle of Man (Customs) Act (title only). 57, Appropriation Act [litle only).<br /> Act.<br /> 32. Merchant Shipping (Liability of Ship 58. Tithe Rentcharge (Ireland) Act [title only).<br /> 13. County Councils (Elections) Act Amend owners and others) Act.<br /> 59. Housing of the Working Classes Act.<br /> ment Act.<br /> 33. Wild Animals in Captivity Protection Act. 60. Tramways (Ireland) Act (tille only].<br /> 14. Colonial Solicitors Act.<br /> 34. Ancient Monuments Protection Act, 61, Supplemental War Loen Act ſtille only).<br /> 15, Burial Act.<br /> 35. Oil in Tobacco Act.<br /> 62. Colonial Stock Act.<br /> 16. District Councillors and Guardians (Term 36. Public Works Loans Act [title only]. 63. Local Government (Ireland) Act [title only).<br /> of Ofice) Act,<br /> 37. Expiring Lawg Continuance Act.<br /> 17. Naval Réserve (Mobilisation) Act [title 38. Elementary School Teachers Superannua List of Local and Personal Acts.<br /> only).<br /> tion (Isle of Man) Act [title only)<br /> 18. County Surveyors (Ireland) Act ſtille only]. 39. Volunteer Act.<br /> Index.<br /> LONDON : HORACE Cox, LAW TIMES” OFFICE, WINDSOR HOUSE, BREAM&#039;S BUILDINGS, E.C.<br /> Licences (Ireland) Actric rocers&#039; Retail<br /> astralia Constitution 31<br /> In demy 8vo., 700 pages, price 7s. 6d., the Fourth Edition of<br /> AN ANECDOTAL HISTORY<br /> THE BRITISH PARLIAMENT,<br /> FROM THE<br /> EARLIEST PERIODS TO THE PRESENT TIME.<br /> WITH<br /> NOTICES OF EMINENT PARLIAMENTARY MEN, AND EXAMPLES OF THEIR ORATORY.<br /> COMPILED FROM AUTHENTIC SOURCES BY<br /> GEORGE HENRY JENNINGS.<br /> CONTENTS :<br /> PART 1.-Rise and Progress of Parliamentary Institutions.<br /> APPENDIX.-(A) Lists of the Parliaments of England and of the<br /> PART 11.- Personal Anecdotes : Sir Thomas More to John Morley.<br /> United Kingdom.<br /> PART III.-Miscellaneous : 1. Elections. 2. Privilege; Exclusion of<br /> (B) Speakers of the House of Commong.<br /> Strangers; Publication of Debates. 3. Parliamentary<br /> (C) Prime Ministers, Lord Chancellors, and Secretaries<br /> Usages, &amp;c. 4. Varieties.<br /> of State from 1715 to 1892.<br /> <br /> HORACE Cox, “LAW TIMES” OFFICE, WINDSOR HOUSE, BREAM&#039;S BUILDINGS, E.C.<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> P<br /> 2<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 112 (#160) ############################################<br /> <br /> ADVERTISEMENTS.<br /> SALE OF MSS. OF EVERY KIND.<br /> Literary Advice, Revision, Research, etc.<br /> Printing, Publishing, Illustration, Translation, etc.<br /> ARRANGEMENTS FOR<br /> THE LITERARY AGENCY OF LONDON,<br /> 3, HENRIETTA STREET, W.C.<br /> G. RADFORD.<br /> G. H. PERRIS.<br /> THE MOST MAGNIFICENT AND COMPREHENSIVE BOOK OF THE PERIOD.<br /> SOCIAL QUESTIONS AND NATIONAL PROBLEMS: EVILS AND REMEDIES.<br /> Second Edition, about 500 pages, 8vo., 58. 3d. post free, strongly bound in cloth.<br /> Two Books each to the first Twenty Subscribers. Carte-de-visites copied, 28. 6d. half dozen; 48. 6d. dozen. Enlarged to Cabinet size, 39. 60,<br /> and 6s. 6d., to subscribers only. Lecturers, &amp;c., privileges. Special Terms. Will be ready about New Year. Address—<br /> J. W. EMSLEY, Artist and Author, 7, Napier Street, Leeds Road, Bradford, Yorks.<br /> T Y PE W RITING<br /> (Authors&#039; MSS.)<br /> Undertaken by highly educated women of Literary experience (Classical Tripos ; Cambridge Higher<br /> Local; thorough acquaintance with modern languages). Authors&#039; References.<br /> Terms (cash), 1s. 8d. per 1000 words; over 5000, 1s.<br /> S. R., 1, LINGARDS ROAD, LEWISHAM, S.E.<br /> TYPEWRITING BY OLERGYMAN&#039;S DAUGHTER AND ASSISTANTS.<br /> MISS E. M. SIKES.<br /> The West Kensington Typewriting Agency,<br /> 13, Wolverton Gardens, Hammersmith, W.<br /> (ESTABLISHED 1898.)<br /> Authors&#039; MSS. carefully and promptly copied. 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Inclusive prices.<br /> Novels and Stories, 8d. per 1000 words; in duplicate, Is.<br /> Plays, Poems, &amp;c., Is. per 1000 words ; in duplicate, Is. 3d.<br /> Also Technical and Scientific work: French and Snanish<br /> c work; French and Spanish.<br /> Specimen of work and Extracts from Testimonials on application.<br /> L. A. ST. JOHN, 20, Lucas Avenue, Upton Park, London, E.<br /> THE GLEVUM MSS. CARRIER<br /> MSS. CAREFULLY &amp; EXPEDITIOUSLY TYPEWRITTEN.<br /> 10d. per 1000 words.<br /> Duplicate copies half price.<br /> MISS E. D. 000K, 21, Windsor-road, Holloway, London, N.<br /> THE<br /> Transmits papers by post or otherwise, without rolling, creasing, or<br /> folding. Fasteng as easily as an envelope, and can be used many<br /> times by the addition of a fresh label.<br /> Three Sizes-Prices 5d., 6d., and 7d. each.<br /> Sold by MESSRS. PARTRIDGE &amp; COOPER,<br /> 191 &amp; 192, Fleet Street, and 1 &amp; 2, Chancery Lane.<br /> AUTHOR&#039;S HAIRLESS PAPER-PAD<br /> TRANSLATIONS<br /> (Accurate), Literary, Plays, &amp;c., from 6d. per folio Typewritten. All<br /> work personally superintended.<br /> WILLIAMS, 85, Finsbury Pavement, E.C.<br /> (Barlock Typewriter for Sale, £8 108. Bargain.)<br /> (The LEADENHALL PRESS LTD., Publishers &amp; Printers,<br /> 50, Leadenhall Street, London, E.C.)<br /> Contains hairless paper, over which the pen slips with perfect<br /> freedom. Sixpence each. 58. per dozen, ruled or plain. New Pocket<br /> Size, 88. per dozen, ruled or plain. Authors should note that THE<br /> LEADENHALL PRESS LTD. cannot be responsible for the loss of MSS.<br /> by Are or otherwise. Duplicate copies should be retained.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 113 (#161) ############################################<br /> <br /> The Author,<br /> (The Organ of the Incorporated Society of Authors. Monthly.)<br /> CONDUCTED BY WALTER BESANT.<br /> VOL. XI.—No. 7.]<br /> DECEMBER I, 1900.<br /> [PRICE SIXPENCE.<br /> For the Opinions expressed in papers that are<br /> signed or initialled the Authors alone are<br /> responsible. None of the papers or para-<br /> graphs must be taken as expressing the<br /> collective opinions of the Committee unless<br /> they are officially signed by G. Herbert<br /> Thring, Sec.<br /> M HE Secretary of the Society begs to give notice that all<br /> 1 remittances are acknowledged by return of post, and<br /> requests that all members not receiving an answer to<br /> important communications within two days will write to him<br /> without delay. All remittances should be crossed Union<br /> Bank of London, Chancery-lane, or be sent by registered<br /> letter only.<br /> III. THE ROYALTY SYSTEM.<br /> It is above all things necessary to know what the<br /> proposed royalty means to both sides. It is now possible<br /> for an author to ascertain approximately and very nearly<br /> the truth. From time to time the very important figures<br /> connected with royalties are published in The Author.<br /> Readers can also work out the figures themselves from the<br /> “ Cost of Production.”<br /> IV. A COMMISSION AGREEMENT.<br /> The main points are :-<br /> (1.) Be careful to obtain a fair cost of production.<br /> (2.) Keep control of the advertisements.<br /> (3.) Keep control of the sale price of the book.<br /> GENERAL<br /> All other forms of agreement are combinations of the four<br /> above mentioned.<br /> Such combinations are generally disastrous to the author.<br /> Never sign any agreement without competent advice from<br /> the Secretary of the Society.<br /> Stamp all agreements with the Inland Revenue stamp.<br /> Avoid agreements by letter if possible.<br /> The main points which the Society has always demanded<br /> from the outset are :-<br /> (1.) That both sides shall know what an agreement<br /> means.<br /> (2.) The inspection of those account books which belong<br /> to the author. We are advised that this is a right, in the<br /> nature of a common law right, which cannot be denied or<br /> withheld.<br /> Communications and letters are invited by the Editor on<br /> all subjects connected with literature, but on no other sub-<br /> jects whatever. Articles which cannot be accepted are<br /> returned if stamps for the purpose accompany the MSS.<br /> GENERAL MEMORANDA.<br /> WARNINGS TO DRAMATIC AUTHORS.<br /> UT ERE are a few standing rules to be observed in an<br /> agreement. There are four methods of dealing<br /> with literary property :<br /> I. THAT OF SELLING IT OUTRIGHT.<br /> This is in some respects the most satisfactory, if a proper<br /> price can be obtained. But the transaction should be<br /> managed by a competent agent, or with the advice of the<br /> Secretary of the Society.<br /> II. A PROFIT-SHARING AGREEMENT (a bad form of<br /> agreement).<br /> In this case the following rules should be attended to : .<br /> (1.) Not to sign any agreement in which the cost of pro.<br /> duction forms a part without the strictest investigation.<br /> . (2.) Not to give the publisher the power of putting the<br /> profits into his own pocket by charging for advertisements<br /> in his own organs: or by charging exchange advertise-<br /> ments. Therefore keep control of the advertisements.<br /> (3.) Not to allow a special charge for “office expenses,&quot;<br /> anless the same allowance is made to the author.<br /> (4.) Not to give up American, Colonial, or Continental<br /> rights.<br /> (5.) Not to give up serial or translation rights.<br /> í (6.) Not to bind yourself for future work to any publisher.<br /> As well bind yourself for the future to any one solicitor or<br /> doctor!<br /> 1. N EVER sign an agreement without submitting it to<br /> the Secretary of the Society of Authors or some<br /> competent legal authority.<br /> 2. It is well to be extremely careful in negotiating for<br /> the production of a play with anyone except an established<br /> manager.<br /> 3. There are three forms of dramatic contract for PLAYS<br /> IN THREE OR MORE ACTS :-<br /> (a.) SALE OUTRIGHT OF THE PERFORMING RIGHT.<br /> This is unsatisfactory. An author who enters<br /> into such a contract should stipulate in the con-<br /> tract for production of the piece by a certain date<br /> and for proper publication of his name on the<br /> play-bills.<br /> (6.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF PERCENTAGES<br /> on gross receipts. Peroentages vary between<br /> 5 and 15 per cent. An anthor should obtain a<br /> percentage on the sliding scale of gross receipts<br /> in preference to the American system. Should<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 114 (#162) ############################################<br /> <br /> 114<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> reaping no benefit to yourself, and that you are advancing<br /> the best interests of literature in promoting the indepen.<br /> dence of the writer.<br /> 6. The Committee have now arranged for the reception of<br /> members&#039; agreements and their preservation in a fireproof<br /> safe. The agreements will, of course, be regarded as con-<br /> fidential documents to be read only by the Secretary, who<br /> will keep the key of the safe. The Society now offers :-(1)<br /> To read and advise apon agreements and publishers. (2) To<br /> stamp agreements in readiness for a possible action upon<br /> them. (3) To keep agreements. (4) To enforce payments<br /> due according to agreements.<br /> THE READING BRANCH.<br /> obtain a sum in advance of percentages. A fixed<br /> date on or before which the play should be<br /> performed.<br /> (c.) SALE OF PERFORMING RIGHT OR OF A LICENCE<br /> TO PERFORM ON THE BASIS OF ROYALTIES (i.e.,<br /> fixed nightly fees). This method should be<br /> always avoided except in cases where the fees<br /> are likely to be small or difficult to collect. The<br /> other safeguards set out under heading (6.) apply<br /> also in this case.<br /> 4. PLAYS IN ONE ACT are often sold outright, but it is<br /> better to obtain a small nightly fee if possible, and a sum<br /> paid in advance of such fees in any event. It is extremely<br /> important that the amateur rights of one act plays should<br /> be reserved.<br /> 5. Authors should remember that performing rights can<br /> be limited, and are usually limited by town, country, and<br /> time. This is most important.<br /> 6. Authors should not assign performing rights, but<br /> should grant a licence to perform. The legal distinction is<br /> of great importance.<br /> 7. Authors should remember that performing rights in a<br /> play are distinct from literary copyright. A manager<br /> holding the performing right or licence to perform cannot<br /> print the book of the words.<br /> 8. Never forget that American rights may be exceedingly<br /> valuable. They should never be included in English<br /> agreements without the author obtaining a substantial<br /> consideration.<br /> 9. Agreements for collaboration should be carefully<br /> drawn and executed before collaboration is commenced.<br /> 10. An author should remember that production of a play<br /> is highly speculative: that he runs a very great risk of<br /> delay and a breakdown in the fulfilment of his contract.<br /> He should therefore guard himself all the more carefully in<br /> the beginning.<br /> 11. An author must remember that the dramatic market<br /> is exceedingly limited, and that for a novice the first object<br /> is to obtain adequate pablication.<br /> As these warnings must necessarily be incomplete on<br /> account of the wide range of the subject of dramatic con-<br /> tracts, those authors desirous of further information are<br /> referred to the Secretary of the Society.<br /> M EMBERS will greatly assist the Society in this<br /> 1 branch of their work by informing young writers of<br /> its existence. Their MSS. can be read and treated<br /> as a composition is treated by a coach. The term MSS.<br /> includes not only works of fiction but poetry and dramatic<br /> works, and when it is possible, under special arrangement,<br /> technical and scientific works. The Readers are writers of<br /> competence and experience. The fee is one guinea.<br /> NOTICES.<br /> M HE Editor of The Author begs to remind members of the<br /> I Society that, although the paper is sent to them free<br /> of charge, the cost of producing it would be a very<br /> heavy charge on the resources of the Society if a great<br /> many members did not forward to the Secretary the modest<br /> 68. 6d. subscription for the year.<br /> Communications for The Author should be addressed to<br /> the Offices of the Society, 4, Portugal-street, Lincoln&#039;s-inn<br /> Fields, W.C., and should reach the Editor not later than the<br /> 21st of each month.<br /> All persons engaged in literary work of any kind, whether<br /> members of the Society or not, are invited to communicate<br /> to the Editor any points connected with their work which<br /> it would be advisable in the general interest to publish.<br /> The present location of the Authors&#039; Club is at 3, White-<br /> ball court, Charing Cross. Address the Secretary for<br /> information, rules of admission, &amp;c.<br /> HOW TO USE THE SOCIETY.<br /> LITERARY PROPERTY.<br /> 1. LA VERY. member has a right to ask for and to receive<br /> advice upon his agreements, his choice of a pub.<br /> lisher, or any dispute arising in the conduct of his<br /> business or the administration of his property. If the<br /> advice sought is such as can be given best by a solici.<br /> tor, the member has a right to an opinion from the<br /> Society&#039;s solicitors. If the case is such that Counsel&#039;s<br /> opinion is desirable, the Committee will obtain for him<br /> Counsel&#039;s opinion. All this without any cost to the member.<br /> 2. Remember that questions connected with copyright<br /> and publisher&#039;s agreoments do not generally fall within the<br /> experienoe of ordinary solicitors. Therefore, do not scruple<br /> to use the Society.<br /> 3. Send to the Office copies of past agreements and past<br /> accounts with the loan of the books represented. The<br /> Secretary will always be glad to have any agreements, now<br /> or old, for inspection and note. The information thus<br /> obtained may prove invaluable.<br /> 4. Before signing any agreement whatever, send the pro.<br /> posed document to the Society for examination.<br /> 5. Remember always that in belonging to the Society you<br /> are fighting the battles of other writers, even if you are<br /> I.-THE PUBLISHER AND THE AGENT.<br /> THE business of the literary agent is not run<br /> on philanthropic lines any more than the<br /> - business of the publisher.<br /> In each case the first aim is entirely a selfish<br /> one—to obtain a living wage, the amount of the<br /> living wage-varying according to the ambition of<br /> the worker; the next is to benefit the author<br /> whose work is being undertaken.<br /> In an article which appeared in The Author for<br /> July, 1900, evidence was given of a series of con-<br /> tracts which might be worked beneficially for the<br /> publisher and disastrously for the author,<br /> although the agreements on the face of them<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 115 (#163) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 115<br /> appeared to be reasonable and just, the fault<br /> lying in the action of the publisher rather than<br /> in the form of agreement. It is possible also<br /> that under certain circumstances an agent while<br /> appearing to work for the author&#039;s benefit may<br /> really be playing into the publisher&#039;s hands, and<br /> it is necessary therefore from time to time to call<br /> the attention of authors to the difficulties that<br /> may beset their path when under the guidance of<br /> an agent.<br /> It should, however, in all justice be remarked<br /> that in many cases an agent&#039;s assistance is<br /> essential to the author, and that there are agents<br /> who work unreservedly for the author&#039;s interest,<br /> to whom the following remarks do not apply<br /> To begin with, literary agents are not as a rule<br /> lawyers, and, therefore, are hardly competent to<br /> draw up a legal document or to advise the author<br /> on signing the same.<br /> This point has become apparent on reviewing a<br /> series of contracts which have been, during the<br /> last few months, brought to the Society&#039;s offices,<br /> unfortunately after signature and after accepting<br /> the agent&#039;s advice.<br /> An agent has allowed an author to enter into<br /> half-profit agreements and royalty agreements<br /> with exceedingly low royalties, and to bind him.<br /> self to the publisher for the next two books on the<br /> same terms.<br /> That the agent should pass an agreement for<br /> half profits and for low royalties might perhaps<br /> be excusable under exceptional circumstances,<br /> but that an agent should pass the two-book clause<br /> is absolutely and entirely inexcusable. Such<br /> action shows either a complete disregard of the<br /> author&#039;s business or an absolute ignorance of his<br /> (the agent&#039;s) own, unless, absit omen, there are<br /> other and deeper reasons for the step.<br /> This rule must be laid down as absolute: No<br /> author should, under any circumstances, bind<br /> himself to a publisher for more than one book.<br /> It is better for the author that the book should<br /> not be published at all than published on these<br /> terms. But what does the publisher say in his<br /> defence ?<br /> He states—the Society has letters to show it,<br /> that, unless he has the control of the next two<br /> books, he will not take the same interest in the<br /> author&#039;s work, and will not push it to the same<br /> extent.<br /> A candid confession, indeed, for an honourable<br /> publisher!<br /> But what is the real result? The publisher,<br /> having secured the handling of the next two<br /> books on ridiculously low terms, runs the first<br /> book until it has covered its expenses and put the<br /> usual 15 to 20 per cent. in his pocket, and then<br /> neglects to push it any further.<br /> Not all the lamentations of the author will<br /> move him. The publisher is anxious to push<br /> other books forward. He has taken the cream off<br /> the milk.<br /> For the reason of this action by the publisher,<br /> reference is again made to the article, entitled<br /> “Trade Methods,&quot; that appeared in The Author<br /> of July, 1900.<br /> Do not sign agreements containing the above<br /> condition, not even though the agent may stand<br /> over you pen in hand and demand your signature,<br /> stating that he can do no more for you if you<br /> refuse to sign.<br /> The conclusion, then, to be arrived at is that<br /> the publisher, as he has the refusal of two more<br /> books at cheap terms, gives really less attention<br /> to the author&#039;s success and takes less pains than<br /> if he had one work only.<br /> For in the latter case, if the publisher believes<br /> in his author, he is anxious to do his best for him<br /> that the author may come to him again-a course<br /> the author gladly takes when he has been well<br /> treated.<br /> Again, agreements that have passed through an<br /> agent&#039;s hands are frequently brought forward,<br /> which assign translation rights, Continental<br /> rights, American rights, and even dramatic rights<br /> to the publisher, and the author has to allow the<br /> publisher 50 per cent. if he succeeds in selling or<br /> getting rid of them.<br /> Now, it is not the publisher&#039;s business to sell<br /> these rights, as will be further explained below.<br /> In any case, the publisher is not entitled to 50 per<br /> cent of the returns.<br /> Another form of agreement sanctioned by an<br /> agent, equally disastrous to the author, is the<br /> following :-<br /> An author published a book at his own expense<br /> and the edition was limited. The agreement<br /> allowed to the publisher 15 per cent. on the cost<br /> of production including advertisements, and 15<br /> per cent. on the produce of the sales, and the<br /> number of the edition was such that if all sold<br /> at the full price the author was bound to lose.<br /> Now 15 per cent. both ways is a percentage far<br /> too heavy, and 15 per cent. on the cost of pro-<br /> duction does not naturally induce the publisher<br /> to keep it as low as possible.<br /> In this particular case the author had to pay<br /> the publishers according to the accounts a sum of<br /> over £60.<br /> The agent if he had known his business should<br /> certainly have pointed out that the edition limited<br /> to the number proposed in the agreement and<br /> selling at the price proposed could not possibly<br /> cover the cost. The book is still selling, but as<br /> the type has been distributed it is impossible now<br /> to print any more in order to secure the author.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 116 (#164) ############################################<br /> <br /> 116<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> From these examples it is evident that agents publisher may put a great deal of other business<br /> are not only in many cases incompetent to act as through an agent&#039;s hands. The agent naturally<br /> legal advisers, but that often they are wanting in desires to keep such a good source of income, and,<br /> knowledge of their business as the confidential in return, when a promising young author comes<br /> assistants of authors.<br /> forward he takes the book to his friend the pub-<br /> If authors have any doubt about the document lisher, and if the terms offered consist, in addition<br /> laid before them they should certainly consult to other clauses, of an assignment to the publisher<br /> the Society, even though the agent may see objec. of minor rights and two more books under similar<br /> tions, as he surely will, to their adopting this conditions, the author is told that it is all-<br /> course.<br /> important that his book should be produced on<br /> There are agents, well known to the Society, any terms.<br /> who have a very strong objection that these It is possible that the author may demur, but<br /> matters should be placed before the Secretary his scruples are easily overcome, as he is working<br /> The deduction is obvious.<br /> in the dark.<br /> There may be another reason, however, besides An agent should advise that a book should<br /> incompetence which may induce an agent to act never be published, rather than published on such<br /> on lines disadvantageous to the author, namely, conditions. He should have tried every reputable<br /> the fact that he may be directly or indirectly publisher in England rather than sanction such<br /> under the control of a publisher. It has been an agreement.<br /> pointed out in this article that sometimes an This is no place to discuss the moral aspect of<br /> agent allows an author to sell his minor rights to the question, we are dealing merely with the<br /> a publisher, in other places it bas been shown business view as to how the author&#039;s interests are<br /> that publishers have with increasing effort been effected.<br /> endeavouring to obtain these rights when nego. Again, it is possible that such a case as the<br /> tiating directly. (See “ Publishers&#039; Agreements, following might occur:<br /> with Comments,&quot; issued by the Society.)<br /> An agent is exceedingly busy with the works<br /> It is not the business of the publisher to act as of many authors. It is important that he should<br /> authors&#039; agent, and very often with these rights get some of them settled and off his hands at the<br /> in their hands they do not know how to market earliest opportunity.<br /> them or do not care about taking the trouble. Therefore, in a moment of carelessness he<br /> They put them into the hands of an agent and advises an author to accept such terms as would<br /> are willing to take any price for them they can not be on the whole satisfactory in their result to<br /> get, without thinking of the author&#039;s reputation the author.<br /> or the market value of his writing, merely hoping This case, like the former, points to the fact<br /> that they may make £50 or £60 extra to increase that the author cannot be too careful about what<br /> the already assured profit from the production of agreement he enters into, whether such agree-<br /> the book.<br /> ment is put before him directly by the publisher<br /> It may therefore occur that an agent is at one or by the publisher through his (the author&#039;s)<br /> and the same time selling the same author&#039;s work own agent.<br /> for the author and for the publisher. He may T&#039;he mere question of the financial terms of an<br /> wish for some special reason (this is no impossible agreement is by no means the only one which<br /> supposition) to keep in with the publisher, and should be looked into. In some cases the control<br /> accordingly undersells the author in his own of the property is even of more importance to the<br /> market.<br /> author than the financial question.<br /> This is a very dangerous position, and the In conclusion, therefore, before signing any<br /> author should be exceedingly careful never under agreement, read carefully and study “Publishers&#039;<br /> any circumstances to sell these rights to the pub- Agreements, with Comments,&quot; issued by the<br /> lisher, not even on the agent&#039;s advice.<br /> Society.<br /> It is the publisher&#039;s duty to publish in book Never sign any agreement that gives the pub-<br /> form, subject to whatever limitations the author lisher the control of future work. Rather refrain<br /> may think fit to impose upon him.<br /> from publishing altogether.<br /> It is not the duty of the publisher to obtain Never give the publisher the control of minor<br /> the minor rights of the author and sell them for rights, which are usually handled by an agent.<br /> his own benefit.<br /> Never allow an agent to persuade you to any<br /> It is possible, again—this example would not of these acts, even though he assures you that he<br /> have been brought forward if the extraordinary will not act further for you if you refuse.<br /> agreements which had been passed by agents had And be sure to refer any points about which you<br /> not come to the notice of the Society-that a may be doubtful to the Secretary of the Society.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 117 (#165) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 117<br /> Lastly, remember that agents are but human, states: “If through inadvertence a single copy<br /> they may have other axes to grind besides the were issued without this label”-i.e., the notice<br /> author&#039;s, and that they, in some cases, have a required by the Act that the performing rights<br /> pronounced objection to having any agreement or are reserved—“the value of the right of represen-<br /> arrangement which may be in dispute placed tation might be lost.”<br /> before the Society for its Secretary to criticise.<br /> The section, however, runs :<br /> G. H. T.<br /> The defendant in such proceedings may be acquitted of<br /> such infringement, and may be entitled to the costs of<br /> II.-DRAMATIC COPYRIGHT.—LORD MONKS-<br /> resisting the proceedings, if he proves to the satisfaction of<br /> WELL&#039;S BILL.*<br /> the court that he has in his possession a copy of the book<br /> As one who has made a careful study of the containing such dramatic or musioal work, and that such<br /> Copyright Law and the new Bill I should like to copy was published with the assent of the owner of the<br /> say a few words on Mr. Grundy&#039;s interesting copyright and does not contain the notice, &amp;c.<br /> article in your November number. He opens the From this it is clear that (1) the onus probandi<br /> article by stating that the Bill is not drafted from lies with the defendant; (2) “ that the book con-<br /> the point of view of a playwright. Here I beg to taining, &amp;c.,&quot; must be published with the assent<br /> differ from him. A careful jerusal of the Bill of the owner of the copyright.<br /> will tend to show that this point of view bas N ow I take it that after the passing of this Act<br /> been considered equally with that of the writer no dramatic work will be published without the<br /> of books (the novelist is not the only literary notice “ with the assent of the author.” It<br /> person considered), and perhaps over-considered. appears that if a book is published without the<br /> Over-consideration has a tendency to produce an notice the question will be: Did the author assent<br /> unsatisfactory result.<br /> to the book being published in the particular<br /> The next point in Mr. Grundy&#039;s letter is the form and without this notice ? —and the question<br /> duration of copvright. Here I am entirely in must be dealt with from the point of view of the<br /> accord with him. Copyright ought to be per- activity, not the passivity, of the author; commis-<br /> petual, and no doubt will be some day. But life sion, not omission. In this case there would be<br /> and thirty years is better than the present no “ inadvertence.”<br /> arrangement, although I think a struggle should Mr. Grundy&#039;s remark, “It might then be<br /> be made to bring it up to life and fifty, with a argued that section 7 is retrospective,&quot; appears to<br /> view of bringing our new legislation into line be quite untenable.<br /> with that of other nations, an important point Clause 5, sections 6 and 7, though unsatis-<br /> which is being too much overlooked.<br /> factory to the dramatist, appears to be the result<br /> Here the dramatic author is dealt with on an rather of over-consideration of his point of view<br /> equal basis with the writer of books.<br /> than non-consideration.<br /> The point of view of both is equally considered. That the Bill as a whole weakens the power of<br /> His view of clause 5, section 5, is interesting. the dramatic author cannot be admitted; that it<br /> First, however, let it be said that again as to this is not absolutely satisfactory (what human<br /> clause the dramatic author is dealt with on an measure is ?) is no doubt true.<br /> equal basis with the writer of books, and that a It is not absolutely satisfactory to any body of<br /> similar clause (clause 4) applies to books also. authors, literary, musical, or dramatic, but the<br /> The clause refers to indecent profane, &amp;c., dramatic receive quite as many plums as the<br /> dramatic or musical work in which no copyright others.<br /> is given. Mr. Grundy says: “so that a thief has Finally, Mr. Grundy&#039;s article is entirely destruc-<br /> only to add profanity, indecency, sedition, or libel tive. It would have been more satisfactory if,<br /> to his theft to be exempted from the penalty of after he bad pulled the edifice to the ground, he<br /> his dishonesty.” Now, this deduction is distinctly had pointed out how it might be re-constructed<br /> amusing.<br /> on happier lines.<br /> A LAWYER.<br /> There is another form of lawmask the Public<br /> Prosecutor--that deals with indecent, &amp;c., works,<br /> III.-PUBLISHERS AS AGENTS.<br /> and the author that indulges in infringement of The following paragraph appeared in the<br /> copyright works by adding indecency, &amp;c., falls Publishers&#039; Circular of Oct. 27, 1900:<br /> out of the frying-pan into the fire.<br /> Notwithstanding the high prices paid to authors who<br /> In clause 5, sections 6 and 7 (quoted in full in have made a name and manage to keep it, the position of<br /> Mr. Grundy&#039;s letter) he makes an absolutely sound the less fortunate ones seems to become increasingly difficult.<br /> and satisfactory suggestion, but here again his We have before us a case in which a new story by a writer<br /> who some years ago had a decided vogue has been offered<br /> example is not satisfactory, for this reason. He<br /> for exclusive publication in a paper reserving three counties<br /> * See page 132.<br /> as its area, one of the counties being the most populous in<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 118 (#166) ############################################<br /> <br /> 118<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> England outside of London, at-wbat figures do our readers Statute Law designed to protect it from common<br /> suppose? They are not likely to guess, so we will name it; robbers who were something more than plagiarists.<br /> it was £5. The story, it may be mentioned, runs to nearly<br /> The dramatic pickpockets who stole literary hand-<br /> 100,000 words, and is offered at the figure we have named<br /> not by a syndicate, but by a firm of publishers. Is it<br /> kerchiefs, picking the initials of the owners out<br /> prudent to cat prices in this way? The story that is worth of the corners and substituting their own, were<br /> only £5 for serial rights in three counties is worth nothing overlooked with contempt, as the property they<br /> at all, for the story that is worth anything is worth more<br /> stole was considered to have no literary value;<br /> than £5 for such an area. We confess we were a good<br /> and the stage, supplied and satisfied with this<br /> deal surprised when particulars of the case under con.<br /> sideration were placed before us, and we cannot believe reruse, was never thought likely to burgle the<br /> that business done on a principle of unreasonable or indis. strongholds of literature-properly so called. The<br /> criminate catting is to the advantage of either author or chartered felony of Shakespeare in one age and<br /> publisher.<br /> one language, and the equally chartered and more<br /> Attention is drawn to the paragraph for this impudent felony of Molière in another age and<br /> very important reason, that over and over again in another language, did not disturb this complacent<br /> the publications of the Society, the Secretary has theory, and the statutory definition of copyright<br /> warned authors against assigning to publishers never coutemplated such a thing as stage-right,<br /> what may be called “outside rights,” and the<br /> or the power of selecting plot, story, characters,<br /> danger of such an assignment. Those members names, titles, dialogue, &amp;c., at will from any work<br /> of the Authors&#039; Society who care to refer to the<br /> of fiction, re-arranging them in any form that<br /> articles must look at “the Publishers&#039; Agreements, might please the selecter, and using them for<br /> with Comments,” published by the Society, and an fame and profit, not only without the consent,<br /> article entitled “The Publisher and the Agent,” but often in defiance of the active opposition of<br /> in The Author of July 1, 1899. The main points, the original creator and owner. This was not<br /> however, to notice are these: (1) The publisher, justice, but it was law—a legalised form of<br /> as an almost universal rule, claims 50 per cent. robbery, and those who objected to it had the<br /> for the sale of serial rights and translation rights. stone wall of costs to knock their heads against.<br /> He even claims the same on dramatic rights. The first and greatest victim of recent times<br /> (2) The publisher&#039;s business is not the sale of was Mrs. Henry Wood, the novelist, whose<br /> these rights but the publication in book form.<br /> popular story of “ East Lynne” was pounced<br /> The publisher has not the facilities that either an upon by some nameless hack who used the licence<br /> author or an author&#039;s agent has for obtaining given him by a highly-paid legislature and drama-<br /> a market. And lastly (3) the new danger which tised the work without the slightest communica-<br /> is shown to arise from the paragraph printed tion with the author. The result of this robbery<br /> above-namely, that an author by placing these by Act of Parliament has been that Mrs. Henry<br /> rights in the hands of a publisher, may not only Wood, with her heirs, executors, and assigns,<br /> be underselling his own work, but may also at have been despoiled during the allotted span of<br /> the same time be seriously underselling the work copyright of a sum that at the lowest computa-<br /> of other authors, as the publisher&#039;s one desire is tion may be taken at a quarter of a million<br /> not so much to get the highest price possible for sterling, supposing her equitable stage-right had<br /> the author&#039;s benefit, but to get a quick market been enforced with the business ability which<br /> for his wares.<br /> G. H. T.<br /> directs the operations of a Pinero or a Barrie.<br /> -<br /> This unblushing encouragement of a “ Thieves&#039;<br /> Kitchen ” by the legislature—an encouragement<br /> that has been stigmatised by public writers for<br /> LEGALISED ARTISTIC ROBBERY.<br /> more than a quarter of a century-naturally<br /> Republished from Literature, Oct. 20, 1900, by kind<br /> stimulated authors with a legal training to take<br /> permission of the proprietors and of the author.<br /> steps for their own protection. One of the earliest<br /> Go, little book, from this, my solitude,<br /> and most successful of these authors who could<br /> I cast thee on the waters, -wend thy ways,<br /> take care of themselves was the late Mr. Charles<br /> And if, as I believe, thy plot be good,<br /> Reade—a writer who possessed the unusual double<br /> The stage will grab thee before many days.<br /> gift of novelist and dramatist. I say unusual,<br /> THEN it first entered the minds of our because neither Thackeray nor Dickens possessed<br /> appointed legislators that literary pro it. To be a dramatist was one of Thackeray&#039;s<br /> duce, like more vulgar and material unsatisfied ambitions, and Dickens positively<br /> produce, had a claim (far more shadowy, of smelt of the footlights. Charles Reade produced<br /> course) to be considered as property, it occurred a drama at Drury Lane Theatre, which I should<br /> to them that it would be advisable to supplement almost be justified in describing as a theatrical<br /> the rough equity of the Common Law with a “man-trap and spring-gun.” It was called<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 119 (#167) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 119<br /> “ Gold,” and it contained in solution the seeds The late Watts Phillips, a dramatist by profes-<br /> of another drama and a powerful novel. “Gold” sion, as well as a novelist, the late Charles Mackay,<br /> ran its allotted time, and in due course the novel Tom Taylor, Westland Marston, William Gilbert,<br /> of “It&#039;s Never Too Late to Mend” appeared, to Sir Charles Young, Florence Marryat, and Pal.<br /> be followed by a carefully-prepared drama bear grave Simpson all write in the same strain, with<br /> ing the same title. Some time before Charles W. S. Gilbert, F. W. Robinson, and other writers<br /> Reade&#039;s version of his novel found its way to the still living. An Authors&#039; Protection Society was<br /> stage, the hot and eager &quot;adapters,&quot; as they were the outcome of this agitation (for it assumed the<br /> politely called, tumbled over each other in their form of an agitation), and a Royal Commission<br /> haste to utilise the novelist&#039;s invention. Ile was was appointed, consisting of Lord John Manners,<br /> waiting for them. He selected one “ adaptation” the Earl of Devon, Sir Charles Young, Sir Henry<br /> (they used stronger terms in “Old Fagin&#039;s” Holland, Sir John Rose, Sir Louis Mallet, Sir H.<br /> days) as a test-case, and easily proved that in Drummond Wolff, Sir Julius Benedict, Mr. Daldy,<br /> “Gold” he had anticipated the pirates and had Mr. Froude, Mr. Herschell, Dr. W. Smith, Mr.<br /> secured his stage-right in “It&#039;s Never Too Late FitzJames Stephen, Mr. Edward Jenkins, M.P., and<br /> to Mend” by priority of production.<br /> Mr. Anthony Trollope. Our committee comprised<br /> This signal victory obtained over legalised fraud Mr. Tom Taylor, Mr. Charles Dickens, jun., Mr.<br /> by an author who combined in his single person B. L. Farjeon, Mr. Charles Gibbon, Mr.J. Glaisher,<br /> novelist, dramatist, and sharp attorney roused F.R.S., Mr. Joseph Hatton, Mr. Edward Jenkins,<br /> novelists to a sense of the value of stage-right. M.P., Mr. Blanchard Jerrold, Mr. Charles Reade,<br /> but few of them had the energy or were in the and Mr. Moy Thomas, who consented to act as<br /> position to take action. Their stories, such as honorary secretary. The Commission sat and<br /> they were, were printed and published (some of took long, exhaustive, and varied evidence, and<br /> them, perhaps, with a weak and valueless noti. its report was published in 1878. It advocated<br /> fication that the “right of dramatisation ” had the protection of the novelist. Twenty-two years<br /> been reserved), and as such, according to the late have passed, and the Blue-book still paves the<br /> Chief Justice Cockburn, were “ dedicated to the vaults of Westminster.<br /> public,” giving any would-be adapter the right to To make a workable play out of a novel, not<br /> use names, titles, incidents, plot, and anything he written with an eye to the stage, requires much<br /> could find within the four corners of the binding labour and ingenuity, and a special talent not<br /> for the purpose of stage-representation, but not always possessed by the ordinary writer of fiction.<br /> for printed publication. Naturally writers of In the novel the descriptive writer is perfectly<br /> fiction fretted under this deprivation of a valuable unfettered. He describes his scenery and sur-<br /> right. As far back as 1873, the late “ George roundings, and in many cases his characters<br /> Eliot&quot; wrote to me :<br /> impress themselves upon the reader with the<br /> I thoroughly concar in the opinion that the law of copy. smallest possible amount of dramatic dialogue<br /> right in relation to the dramatisation of novels ought to be and the largest possible amount of descripe<br /> changed, and I gball willingly give my adhesion to any tive writino In the drama this process is<br /> energetic effort towards attaining that end.<br /> reversed. The scenery is handed over to the<br /> The late Lord Lytton :-<br /> scene-painter, and the dress and appearance of<br /> I heartily sympathise with your efforts, and shall be very<br /> the characters are the work of the costume and<br /> willing to co-operate to obtain such an amendment of the<br /> copyright law as may prevent the unauthorised dramatisation wig maker, plus the interpretation of the actor<br /> of novels.<br /> and actress. The words of the dialogue have to<br /> The late Wilkie Collins :-<br /> be subordinated to the action, and if they throw<br /> My “ Poor Miss Finch” has been dramatised, without no light on the inner character of the puppets<br /> asking my permission, by some idiot in the country. I they are worse than useless, and become what the<br /> have been asked to dramatige it, and I have refused, because stage-manager irreverently calls « cackle” This<br /> my experience tells me that the book is eminently unfit for shows that the man who possesses the true optique<br /> stage purposes. What I refuse to do with my own work<br /> du théâtre may be a valuable collaborateur as a<br /> another man (unknown in literatare) is perfectly free to do<br /> against my will and (if he can get his rubbish played) to<br /> reformed thief in the hands of a writer of no<br /> the prejudice of my novel and my reputation.<br /> dramatic talent who is willing to condone a felony.<br /> Miss M. E. Braddon :-<br /> The copyright law entirely overlooks the possi.<br /> I have written twenty-four novels, many of these have bilities of such beneficial partnerships, where<br /> been dramatised, and a fow of the dramatic versions still one man supplies just as much literature, or<br /> hold the stage. I have never received the smallest pecu.<br /> “ cackle,” as may be wanted, and the other the<br /> maplele&quot; as mo<br /> niary advantage from any of these adaptations, nor does the<br /> law of copyright in any way assist me to protect wbat<br /> stage-carpentry-and this law gives the same<br /> appears to be a valuable portion of my copyright-namely, legal protection, neither more nor less, to the thief<br /> the exclusive right to dramatise my own creation.<br /> who finds his play practically ready made as it does<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 120 (#168) ############################################<br /> <br /> I 20<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> to the thief who merely steals rough materials, and wise reflections: “It is,&quot; said M. Hébrard, “by<br /> has to shape them together. A case of this kind drawing closer together; by maintaining a taste<br /> is in the Law Reports-Toole v. Young-in the for fraternal intercourse, for amicable conversa-<br /> seventies. A short story was written in Good tion; by learning to know better, and to esteem<br /> Words in such a form (nearly all dialogue) that frankly, the estimable men who do not think as<br /> it could be transferred to the stage without the we do, that we shall, little by little, introduce into<br /> addition of a dozen words. It was so transferred the Press the habit of courteous polemics, a habit<br /> by an unauthorised so-called adapter, and pro- which excludes neither love for the cause defended<br /> duced in defiance of the writer (myself) and the nor ardent sincerity in the opinions expressed.”<br /> owner by purchase, Mr. J. L. Toole. The action “Nos associations,&quot; he concluded, “sont sorties<br /> before the late Chief Justice Cockburn brought de la presse d&#039;hier ; la presse de demain sortira<br /> out the “ dedication to the public&quot; theory and des associations ! ”<br /> the judgment that the “original source” (the book D espite the popularity enioved by the minor<br /> or the magazine) was open for the whole world<br /> songsters of the café concerts and Montmartre,<br /> to go to and pick out what it fancied. This judg- the Congrès de la Chanson was not particularly<br /> ment was upheld on appeal, in spite of the able successful. From fifty to sixty persons made the<br /> opposition of the late Sir John Karslake.<br /> vastness of the huge salle more apparent during the<br /> Within the last few years a new and almost three days that the session lasted. The Immortals<br /> comic interpretation of a bad statute law has held assiduously aloof from this assemblage of<br /> been acted upon by Mrs. Hodgson Burnett in their humbler brethren, the rythmic exponents of<br /> protecting her “stage rights” in “Little Lord the transient sentiment of the boulevards. A<br /> Fauntleroy.” The Copyright Act, the Printing group of the most eminent literary members of<br /> and Publishing Act—was dragged in to fire a the French Institute were confidently and joyfully<br /> broadside at the pirates, and it was contended expected; one and all sent excuses at the last<br /> that the “ copying of parts” for use at rehearsals, moment. The classics of the people are its song-<br /> and the actors to study, was a “multiplication of writers.&quot; wrote M. Jules Claretie some years ago;<br /> copies” within the meaning of the Copyright yet the director of the Comédie Française was<br /> Act. Mr. Justice Stirling, a sound judge on among the celebrities conspicuous by their<br /> these questions, before whom the case was tried, absence at the Congrès de la Chanson. In 1892<br /> upheld this view, and, for the present, this the French Academy formally refused the honour<br /> decision holds the field. It is difficult to speak of bestowing an annual donation of 10,000 francs<br /> about such a decision, on such pettifogging on the author of the best song which had appeared<br /> grounds, with becoming respect, and it would be during the year. Hence the present attitude of<br /> foolish to prophesy the result if the case is ever its members.<br /> carried to the Court of Appeal. The weighty<br /> and valuable property of &quot;stage right&quot; ought<br /> THE LIFE OF PASTEUR.<br /> not to be left trembling on such a foundation. This voluminous work (published chez Hachette)<br /> John HOLLINGSHEAD. is one of the most intensely interesting of recent<br /> publications. “La Vie de Pasteur,&#039;&#039; writes a<br /> French critic, “is like a chapter added to Plutarch&#039;s<br /> biographies. It is a page of morality in action.<br /> PARIS LETTER.<br /> Everything there is pure; a subtle perfume of<br /> virtue envelops it. This man loved truth above<br /> 4 bis, Rue des Beaux Arts. everything in the world.” The noble spirit in<br /> MONG the memorable speeches which pre which he carried out his great work is amply<br /> luded the close of the Great Exhibition exemplified in his biography. Written in a<br /> not the least impressive was that delivered masterly style by M. René Vallery - Radot,<br /> by M. Adrien Hébrard at the breakfast given by Pasteur&#039;s son-in-law, it relates succinctly every<br /> the Superior Press Committee of the Exhibition step achieved in the colossal experimenter&#039;s<br /> to the members of the Departmental and Parisian career until its peaceful close in the quiet chamber<br /> Press Associations. Five hundred members overlooking the fair woods of Marnes. The<br /> accepted the invitation. M. Hébrard presided, and friendship existing between Pasteur and Alex-<br /> at the end of the repast delivered a pithy allocution, andre Dumas fils is well known. In describing a<br /> prefacing his remarks with a toast in honour of visit paid by the latter to Pasteur&#039;s sick-room,<br /> M. Jean Dupuy (Minister of Agriculture), presi. M. Radot writes : “ Dumas, who had observed<br /> dent of the Paris Press Syndicate and of the men well, loved and admired Pasteur, who was a<br /> General Syndicate of Press Associations, who genius without pride and full of benevolence.<br /> occupied a seat at his right hand. Among other On this New Year&#039;s afternoon he commenced to<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 121 (#169) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 121<br /> talk to the invalid with a cordiality somewhat<br /> resembling the exuberant gaiety of his father.<br /> In this chamber close to the laboratories, how far<br /> was he removed from all the spheres that he had<br /> scrutinised in which whirled the personages he<br /> had depicted &#039;poor vibrios in human form,&#039; as<br /> he called them-ridiculous, dangerous, or vile!<br /> . . . For there was in this dramatist a man<br /> eager for moral action; there was in this realist,<br /> a symbolist; in this satirist, a mystic..<br /> And the glance of his blue eyes, usually cold and<br /> keen, penetrating the most secret thoughts; that<br /> ironical glance, always on its guard, softened into<br /> an expression of venerating friendship for him<br /> whom he called &#039; notre cher et grand Pasteur.&#039;”<br /> M. SARDOU&#039;s Decision.<br /> The Exhibition has decidedly not been favour.<br /> able to an overflowing literary barvest. A well.<br /> known critic recently fell back on past publica-<br /> tions, because, so he asserted, there were so few<br /> new ones sufficiently interesting to arouse public<br /> curiosity. Meantime, the drama is more in<br /> favour than ever. All rising young authors flock<br /> to the footlights as the swiftest and most effec.<br /> tive method of reaching the public at large. And<br /> speaking of the stage reminds me of an error in<br /> my last notes. It was not M. Antoine who grate-<br /> fully profferred his homage to the drama, in the<br /> shape of an additional 2 per cent. added to the<br /> e<br /> established 10 per cent. royalty received by the<br /> dramatist. Here is what M. Deval (manager of<br /> the Athénée Theatre) says on the subject in an<br /> open letter addressed to the Figaro&#039;s theatrical<br /> correspondent :<br /> “ Certes non! I have not asked for an augmen-<br /> tation of the dramatists&#039; royalty at the Athénée.<br /> On the contrary, it has been summarily imposed<br /> on me.<br /> “I have been called before the inexorable com-<br /> mittee. &quot;You make the maximum every evening<br /> with the “ Demi-Vierges”?&#039; said the terrible<br /> President.<br /> “* But-<br /> “Chut! Do you make the maximum ?&#039;.<br /> “Yes, but my expenses are enormous with<br /> Hading, Mayer, Čarlix, Hirch - .-&#039;<br /> “ Chut! Do you make the maximum ? &#039;<br /> &quot; · Yes— but &quot;<br /> “Twelve per cent. The Athénée is a classified<br /> theatre. Be quiet, and go<br /> “ And I was obliged to go, much vexed,<br /> I confess, at being obliged to pay 12 per cent.<br /> despite myself.<br /> “May the joyous maximum console me long!”<br /> sighs M. Deval in conclusion.<br /> The Société des Auteurs et Compositeurs<br /> Dramatiques will undoubtedly re-echo the wish.<br /> VOL. XI.<br /> AN OLD JOURNALIST.<br /> By the death of M. Pierre Véron, the French<br /> Press loses a journalist of nearly fifty years&#039;<br /> standing. * His name may be cited among the<br /> rare examples of journalists who have made a<br /> fortune solely by journalism. He edited the<br /> Charivari for more than thirty years, and was an<br /> assiduous contributor to Le Monde Illustré.<br /> None knew better than he how to depict the<br /> varying phases of the boulevards. He also wrote<br /> a number of airy, piquant volumes dealing with<br /> the picturesque physiognomies, fashions, and<br /> frolics of Paris boulvardier. Among these<br /> works may be mentioned “ Paris s&#039;amuse,&quot; “ Les<br /> Pantins du Boulevard,” “Les Grimaces Parisi.<br /> ennes,” “Les Propos d&#039;un Boulevardier,” “ Les<br /> Marionnettes,&quot; &amp;c.<br /> Pierre Véron had the misfortune to outlive the<br /> larger number of his contemporaries. Of the<br /> “sacred phalanx” which formerly frequented<br /> Tortini, only Aurélien Scholl, Philibert Aude-<br /> brand, and &#039;Henri Rochefort are still, I believe.<br /> in existence. Everything had changed since the<br /> far-off days when the handsome young journalist<br /> was one of the ornaments of the Variétés&#039; fouer.<br /> He alone had not changed, save in appearance.<br /> Thus a slow misunderstanding rose between the<br /> old man, still standing erect, and the rising<br /> generation. And since he no longer understood<br /> --or was understood-he became a prey to<br /> pessimism and bitterness of spirit.<br /> His hospitality continued unabated to the end.<br /> His conversation was occasionally biting, yet he<br /> had few enemies; and more than one writer of<br /> to-day will remember his name with gratitude.<br /> “He never wished to be anything outside his<br /> profession, and he never used his influence except<br /> for good,” wrote a colleague on the morrow of<br /> Pierre Véron&#039;s death. A truer or more concise<br /> epitome of the man would be hard to find.<br /> A Famous ENCOUNTER.<br /> A recent Press dispute which ended in the<br /> clashing of cold steel recalls to mind the famous<br /> encounter of the late Francisque Sarcey and<br /> Aurélien Scholl re an extremely offensive critique<br /> published by the latter in the Figaro. Its<br /> object was to force the pacific Uncle into fighting<br /> his adversary; since Villemessant, founder of<br /> the Figaro, had wagered Scholl twenty pounds<br /> that Sarcey could not be induced to fight. The<br /> * Since our correspondent wrote his letter, the death of<br /> another eminent French journalist bas been announced.<br /> This is M. Valfrey, the foreign leader-writer (“ Whist &quot;) of<br /> the Figaro. The Westminster Gazette rightly says that<br /> “M. Valfrey&#039;s articles had become almost a European<br /> institution, and with his death a distinct political force<br /> disappears.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 122 (#170) ############################################<br /> <br /> 122<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> ruse succeeded, and the good Uncle sent his and publishers might shoot at one another, under-<br /> seconds to M. Scholl, demanding immediate neath was human sympathy and the desire to help<br /> satisfaction.<br /> one another in time of trouble.<br /> “I hope you will not hurt me badly,&quot; said This assurance is very gratifying. Now there<br /> Sarcey to his antagonist, when the pair met on the happens to be at the present moment a case of<br /> ground.<br /> real and deep trouble. It is a document entitled<br /> “Rest easy-I will be on my guard,” replied “ Form of Agreement issued by the Publishers&#039;<br /> Scholl, good-humouredly.<br /> Association.” Mr. John Murray himself was a<br /> “And if I am short of breath you will give member of the Committee.<br /> me time to rest ? ” pursued the corpulent, peace This document makes the following claims,<br /> loving Sarcey.<br /> among others, upon authors:<br /> Scholl agreed to this also. But no sooner 1. All the rights of a book, including those of<br /> were the combatants in position than the appear. translation and even dramatic rights!<br /> ance of three gendarmes on horseback forced 2. The reckoning of royalties at thirteen as<br /> them to retire to their carriages, and retreat at twelve, whether the book is so sold or not.<br /> full gallop.<br /> 3. The interest on money due to the author for<br /> Arrived at Maubeuge: “We cannot return a period not defined. This means, of course,<br /> to Paris without having fought,” said Scholl, inflicting a fine upon him, large or small, accord-<br /> ominously. “The injury was bloody ; its dénoue ing to the sum due. Thus, if £500 is due, and<br /> ment must be so also.”<br /> the money is kept back for six months, the<br /> A hasty consultation, and Baden-Baden is author at 4 per cent. is mulcted of £10.<br /> decided on. Twelve hours&#039; railway travelling, 4. The right to charge a percentage for his<br /> and the party arrive at the place chosen, a spot office expenses—a right which is not conceded to<br /> not far from the hunting lodge of the King of booksellers or to authors. Nor is it claimed by<br /> Prussia. It is Scholl who tells the story.<br /> solicitors, barristers, and professional men, nor by<br /> “Sarcey put on an enormous pair of spectacles, any trade.<br /> I adjusted my eye-glass.<br /> 5. The right in commission books to charge<br /> “* Allez, messieurs !&#039;<br /> a percentage on every item of the cost, and<br /> “Clic! clac ! several thrusts—and I tear the to take for hinıself discount on all payments.<br /> sleeve of my adversary&#039;s shirt. A slight pin. In other words, the document claims the<br /> prick, a mere leech-bite. But I was aided by right of the publisher—the &quot;equitable&quot; right,<br /> Dr. Thévenet, a personage well known among so called—to get the book printed at as high<br /> duellists. This excellent man had brought, in a cost as he can, in order to increase his own<br /> his surgical case, a small phial of blood, a por profit.<br /> tion of which served to colour the wound more 6. There is no clause recognising the author&#039;s<br /> vividly. The remainder was poured on Sarcey&#039;s legal right to an audit. Perhaps none is<br /> shirt.&quot;<br /> wanted. Nor is there any safeguard against<br /> Thus ended this famous encounter; and none dishonesty.<br /> laughed more heartily over its recital than the 7. There is complete silence as to charging for<br /> good Uncle himself, the third volume of whose advertisements in a publisher&#039;s own papers or<br /> “Quarante Ans de Théâtre ” will appear in a few magazines.<br /> days.<br /> Since so much has been said and written on<br /> DARRACOTTE SCOTT. this subject, the silence must be regarded as<br /> intentional. That is to say, there is nothing<br /> to prevent the publisher from sweeping the<br /> whole returns of the book into his own pocket<br /> NOTES AND NEWS.<br /> by charging for advertisements in his own<br /> papers, and by exchanges. There is no possible<br /> T the dinner given to Mr. John Murray protection for the author if he chooses to do<br /> by the Authors&#039; Club, which is not the so. It is no answer to say that he would not<br /> Authors&#039; Society as some of the papers do so. By this suppression, he seems to purpose<br /> seem to think, pleasant things were said both by charging what he pleases under this head. If the<br /> the chairman of the guest, and by the guest silence was unintentional perhaps Mr. Murray will<br /> himself. Among others the guest is reported to make haste to explain it.<br /> have said that he had discovered among the These claims, with others of less impor-<br /> papers of his house the causes of all the troubles tance, form the present trouble. After Mr.<br /> that were apt to spring up between authors and Murray&#039;s public assurance that authors and pub-<br /> publishers. He also said that though authors lishers“ deal with one another as brethren with<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 123 (#171) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 123<br /> friendly feelings, and without difficulty, or<br /> hostility, or friction,&quot; we may look forward with<br /> perfect confidence to Mr. Murray&#039;s immediate<br /> withdrawal, so far as he is concerned, from this<br /> document.<br /> per cent., which gives him £17 58. more. So that,<br /> in this simple and guileless way, he “bags,” say,<br /> £77 58., all at the author&#039;s expense and out of<br /> the author&#039;s pocket before the sales begin. What,<br /> to repeat, is that elementary law quoted above<br /> from the daily paper ?<br /> A man who undertakes work, whether pablic or private,<br /> as a trustee for others, ought not to place himself in such a<br /> position that his personal gain must conflict with his duty<br /> to those who have trusted him.<br /> Here is an axiom cut out of a daily paper :-<br /> A man who undertakes work, whether public or private,<br /> as a trustee for others, ought not to place himself in such a<br /> position that his personal gain must conflict with his duty<br /> to those who have trusted him.<br /> I suppose that everybody will agree with this<br /> elementary law : everybody, that is, except the<br /> committee of the Publishers&#039; Association. They<br /> say, practically, “ we are not bound by the ordi-<br /> nary laws which govern ordinary folk in fiduciary<br /> relations. We claim to make our personal gain<br /> dependent on the amount we can charge for cost<br /> of production. We demand a percentage on that<br /> that<br /> charge: in other words, the higher the charge the<br /> worse it will be for the author but the better<br /> for us.&quot; We have only to read the Forms of<br /> Agreement to understand this remarkable atti.<br /> tude.<br /> A case in point has been shown me by Mr.<br /> Thring. The agreement claimed 15 per cent. on<br /> the printing, paper, and binding, 15 per cent.<br /> on the advertisements, and 15 per cent. on the<br /> sales.<br /> The interests of the author, for whom the<br /> publisher is acting as a fiduciary relation, are thus<br /> distinctly at variance with those of the publisher<br /> himself. The larger he can make the cost of pro-<br /> duction, the better it will be for him and the<br /> worse for the author. Everybody knows the wide<br /> differences in printers&#039; estimates.<br /> The publisher has only to take the highest.<br /> This will probably be 50 per cent higher than the<br /> lowest. To the publisher this means 22} per<br /> cent. instead of 15 per cent. Then there is an ugly<br /> claim in the “Forms” about discount, in which<br /> the author&#039;s interest and the publisher&#039;s are again<br /> at variance. In the agreement before me the<br /> edition was so limited that the author, on the<br /> most favourable conditions, was bound to lose<br /> £20, while the publisher for his part actually<br /> made £60 without counting the discount. .<br /> Take a simple case. Suppose the cost of pro-<br /> duction should not exceed £100. The publisher,<br /> allowing a charge of £150, pockets £22 108.<br /> With the advertisements, which in such a limited<br /> edition should not be more than £15 or so, he<br /> may first advertise more than is necessary in the<br /> daily and weekly journals-say, £50-and may<br /> then charge another £30 for advertisements in<br /> his own organs and by exchange. He therefore<br /> makes £37 108. Next, he gets discount at 7<br /> The Manchester Guardian returns to the ques-<br /> tion of the sixpenny book. The writer says that<br /> one of my reasons is “rather distressing.&quot; He<br /> quotes my words.<br /> “The low price encourages a low view of literature.<br /> Who will value a thing that costs sixpence, amuses for<br /> an hour, and then is thrown away? How much does<br /> one valae a sixpenny toy ?&quot; The Society of Authors, led<br /> by Sir Walter Besant, has done such excellent work for<br /> the good of all writers that one regrets that it will make<br /> sport for the Philistines by putting forth remarks of this<br /> kind, which lend great colour to the hostile assertion that<br /> the members of the Society see nothing in literature bat the<br /> material of commerce, and value an author parely by his<br /> price per thoasand words.<br /> I suppose that I expressed my meaning badly,<br /> yet I fail to see in it the least indication of con-<br /> sidering literature as nothing but material of<br /> commerce. What I meant was simply what I<br /> said : that and nothing more. We want litera-<br /> ture to be valued, books to be cherished, authors<br /> to be considered as separate and distinct, criti.<br /> cism to be encouraged, standards and canons of<br /> art to be created in the minds of readers. What<br /> was the experience of America at the time when<br /> all English books of any interest were brought<br /> out at sixpence in wretched print and on wretched<br /> paper ? They were bought for a railway journey:<br /> they were read in the train : when they were<br /> finished they were thrown out of window or left<br /> on the seat. That is not the way to make litera.<br /> ture respected. If they had had to pay a dollar<br /> and a half for that book they would have taken it<br /> home, put it upon their shelves, and read it again<br /> and again. I should like to understand what<br /> sport the Philistines can make out of this state.<br /> ment, or how it can possibly touch on the<br /> price of an author per thousand words. And,<br /> further, I would far rather hear that a book<br /> of mine had circulated a few hundreds only at<br /> a price which would ensure the respect always<br /> paid to things that have cost money, than many<br /> thousands at a price which would allow it to be<br /> thrown away as not worth preserving. What has<br /> the Philistine to say to that?<br /> I have on several occasions asked the meaning<br /> of the reproach hurled at the unfortunate author<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 124 (#172) ############################################<br /> <br /> I 24<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> about the thousand words. A MS. intended for<br /> a book, a magazine, or a daily paper must pay<br /> some regard to length. Its length may be<br /> estimated by the sheet of sixteen pages, or by<br /> the page, or by the column; but then it can only<br /> be expressed by the number of words. Why not<br /> the number of words? If, again, MSS. are to be<br /> paid for according to length, that length must<br /> depend on the number of words. As for the<br /> author&#039;s price, the Society has nothing whatever<br /> to do with it, except, in general terms, to expose<br /> sweating, which is a form of robbery ; to insist<br /> on the safeguard of an agreement drawn up with<br /> the advice of experts : and to let the other side<br /> know that the agreement has got to be kept. To<br /> suppose that the Society is interested in increas<br /> ing the “ price of an author per thousand words”<br /> is to be wholly ignorant of its principles and its<br /> methods.<br /> reading of the working classes, which should do<br /> something to introduce a little common sense into<br /> the ignorant talk that we constantly hear. The<br /> working class we are told reads nothing but<br /> &quot;slush ” — well — their favourite authors are<br /> Dickens, Scott, and Marryat. They read nothing<br /> but novels—ask the librarian to name offhand<br /> a few of the books they take out. That popular<br /> novelist, on whom all the critics delight<br /> to jump, sells by the hundred thousand. This,<br /> it is said, shows what the working class read.<br /> Yes, but the working classes do not buy books<br /> at all, not even by this popular novelist. Now,<br /> Mr. Phillips claims for the reading of fiction<br /> that it is not a disease but “a symptom of<br /> interest in things that are brighter and more<br /> alluring than that everyday dull greyness which<br /> surrounds the lives of so many people in this land<br /> of ours. And again :<br /> In view of their squalid daily environment the revelations<br /> of a different world as depicted by the novelist, the fair<br /> scenes of mountain, valley, and river, uncontaminated by<br /> the ugly factories and workshops of industrial progress, the<br /> vivid descriptions of works of art and beauty, the account<br /> of rich dresses and splendid mansions, the clash of swords<br /> and noise of battle, or the armoured panoply of chivalric<br /> times, have an amount of attraction that cannot be very<br /> well understood by those whose lives have been cast in<br /> more favourable circumstances. I cannot see or feel that<br /> this is in any way to be deplored. Before you can raise<br /> the class level of intelligence you must first show the indi-<br /> vidual members something better, and the way to attain.<br /> thereto, so that they may make their endeavour accordingly.<br /> If reading is to be cultivated at all it must be from the<br /> point of interest, and I maintain that the novelist, and he<br /> alone ap to the present, has bad any portion in providing<br /> the material wherewith to establish the love of reading in<br /> the masses on a firm and fruitful basis.<br /> Here is an American view of American poetry<br /> (the Dial, Chicago) :-<br /> Good and sound and of excellent workmanship is the<br /> great mass of recent American literature; but as the<br /> idealist gazes on it be seems to see the vision of a great<br /> strand whereon some tempest has driven a fleet of deeply.<br /> laden ships. Everything for human needs is strewn about<br /> ---food and raiment, and toole, and precious objects. And<br /> many of the ships are seaworthy; but no flood comes and<br /> no wind rises to waft them off the sand. The agitating<br /> power of poetry, the tempestuous stir of great ideas, are<br /> wanting to make the fleet march again in triumph over the<br /> deep.<br /> And here is an appreciation, from the same<br /> paper, of the late Charles Dudley Warner, whose<br /> death is deplored on this side of the Atlantic as<br /> much as on his own side :-<br /> : Charming as are these many volumes of essays and<br /> impressions de voyage, we are inclined to believe that Mr.<br /> Warner made his most enduring contribution to literature<br /> when he wrote, during the last ten years of his life, the<br /> series of tbree novels which provide so suggestive a por-<br /> trayal of what American life has become in its older centres<br /> of civilisation, and in these latter days of frenzied com-<br /> mercialism and pitiful social ideals. &quot;A Little Journey in<br /> the World,” “The Golden House,” and “That Fortune”<br /> make up a sort of novel-trilogy which will always have<br /> deep interest as a set of social documents, and which comes<br /> near to the high-water mark of American fiction. There is<br /> in these books a riper thought and a deeper humanity than<br /> were wont to characterise the author&#039;s earlier writings; if<br /> they are lacking in the quality that goes to the making of<br /> the best class of novels, it is because they are essentially<br /> the product of the critical rather than of the creative<br /> intellect. But their mellow optimism, and their persistent<br /> exaltation of ideals of conduct that have gone too much out<br /> of fashion of late years, give these three novels a place all<br /> but the highest in our fiction, and set a wortby crown upon<br /> the activities of a long and helpful life.<br /> One might also point out that in the evening<br /> when the working man goes to the free library, he<br /> has had a hard day&#039;s work and is tired. Very<br /> few of his class are so strong as to desire<br /> study over any intellectual pursuit after a hard<br /> day&#039;s work. Why should we expect of him what<br /> we never look for in our own young men ? The<br /> lad who has sat at a desk, or attended classes, or<br /> worked at his profession from nine o&#039;clock till six<br /> does not devote his evening as a rule to the<br /> pursuit of science or to study of any kind. We<br /> do not expect or look for such a thing. Why.<br /> then, cast it in the teeth of the craftsman that,<br /> when he knocks off the work that is his livelihood,<br /> he does not take up another and a harder kind of<br /> work? All that we can do is to exhort librarians<br /> to admit only the best current fiction, and to exert<br /> a steady pressure in the choice of books, and to<br /> encourage, in addition to fiction, the reading of<br /> biographies and essays and history. In course<br /> of time there may arise a few who will even read<br /> Literature has published a letter from a Mr.<br /> Cliffe Phillips, of Cardiff, on the subject of the<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 125 (#173) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 125<br /> philosophy; but whatever happens, fiction will<br /> always be the staple--the most delightful form of<br /> reading, the most favourite form of recreation.<br /> We fain would let thy memory dwell<br /> Where rush the tideways of the sea,<br /> Where storms will moan or calms will tell<br /> To all the world our love for thee<br /> Whom all men loved in this old land,<br /> And all men loved across the sea-<br /> We well may clasp our brethren&#039;s hand,<br /> And light the beacon light for thee!<br /> The above lines, by Lord Archibald Campbell,<br /> will be inscribed on the beacon tower which is<br /> now being erected at Duart Point, Mull, in<br /> memory of the late Mr. William Black.<br /> WALTER BESANT.<br /> came out in a handsome volume, very well illus-<br /> trated, and had all the external appearance of a<br /> classic. Alas! no one wanted to read any longer<br /> about Titus and his friend ’Arry. One hears con-<br /> tinually of similar revivals. Mostly they depend<br /> upon illustrations : in some cases they become<br /> school prizes and gift books. As a rule they are<br /> not successful.<br /> Again, of very popular authors-poets and<br /> novelists especially—the world makes a selection<br /> and refuses to look at any more. “ The Cloister<br /> and the Hearth” represents Charles Reade;<br /> “ The Woman in White” and “The Moonstone”<br /> represent Wilkie Collins ; his shorter poems repre-<br /> sent Browning ; his earlier poems, Tennyson. As<br /> regards, however, the revival of writers who were<br /> in some vogue fifty years ago, the question is<br /> whether with them the human interest is so great<br /> as to overcome the bygone fashion of setting,<br /> language, ideas, and dress. It will be interesting<br /> to find out whether this can be said of Smedley&#039;s<br /> work.<br /> W. B.<br /> REVIVALS AND REPRINTS.<br /> USE OF THE SOCIETY&#039;S NAME.<br /> TT may interest some of the readers of The<br /> Author to have once more put before them<br /> - a point which has been raised not only in<br /> these columns, but also in some of the reports of<br /> the Society, namely, that it is not an uncominon<br /> thing for those who are not members to use the<br /> Suciety&#039;s name and the Society&#039;s prestige for<br /> bringing recalcitrant editors and publishers to<br /> book.<br /> TT is announced that new editions are to be<br /> | published of the late Mr. Smedley&#039;s three<br /> novels—were there only three ? -“ Frank<br /> Fairlegh”; “Lewis Arundel”; and “Harry<br /> Coverdale&#039;s Courtship.” How long is it since<br /> those novels appeared ? Between forty and fifty<br /> years, I believe. They were not popular in the<br /> sense that Marryat and Dickens were popular,<br /> but they enjoyed a very considerable amount of<br /> popularity. Partly this was due to the cheerful.<br /> ness of their atmosphere: partly to the well-worn,<br /> but at the time still acceptable nature of the inci.<br /> dents—runaway ponies : long-lost heirs : rescue<br /> of an old gentleman (who proves grateful) from<br /> the footpad : and so forth. Perhaps there is also<br /> a bull in a field : or a rock and a rising<br /> tide: or a sprained ankle: if I remember<br /> right there is a villain in every one. I am<br /> curious to watch this revival. In all popular<br /> fiction there must be something that belongs to<br /> the time: something that, after fifty years, no<br /> longer belongs to the time. It is wonderful to<br /> note in Dickens how much the strong human<br /> element which belongs to all time overcomes the<br /> situations and the characters which could not<br /> exist at a later time. Yet even in Dickens<br /> the younger generation finds a good deal<br /> that has passed away and is no longer inter-<br /> esting. In other writers this is very remark-<br /> able. The “Scenes from Clerical Life,&quot; for<br /> instance, have an antiquated air already :<br /> and, for my own part, I dread to look at “Jane<br /> Eyre ” for fear of finding already a note of the<br /> things passed away. Some years ago the late<br /> Mr. George Bentley attempted to revive Albert<br /> Smith&#039;s “ Adventures of Titus Ledbury.” It<br /> The following case has recently occurred :-A<br /> certain gentleman, who shall be nameless, has<br /> confessed that on two occasions he wrote to an<br /> editor who had not returned his MSS., and stated<br /> that he should apprise the Editor of The Author<br /> if he did not get an answer to his repeated com-<br /> munications.<br /> In both cases this had the effect of bringing<br /> back the MSS.<br /> The gentleman is not a member of the Society,<br /> and, on the Secretary writing to remonstrate with<br /> him on the unwarrantable use he had made of the<br /> name of the Society and that of the Editor of The<br /> Author, he replies as follows :-<br /> I simply told the editor I had written to The Author<br /> anent his conduct, with the result of frightening him.<br /> He continues with the amazing statement :<br /> Whe<br /> for<br /> writers like myself, then I may aspire to join it.<br /> Why, he has just confessed that the mere<br /> unwarranted use of the Society&#039;s name has been<br /> of use to him!<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 126 (#174) ############################################<br /> <br /> 126<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> In answer to this letter, the Secretary of the<br /> Society wrote as follows :-<br /> DEAR SIR,-I beg to thank you for your letter, and would<br /> like to draw your attention to the following points :-<br /> Firstly, that yoаr letter to Sir Walter Besant would lead<br /> one to suppose you bad mentioned his name.<br /> Secondly, that the Society of Autbors, through its organ<br /> The Author, has on two occasions already benefited you,<br /> according to your own statement.<br /> Thirdly, that there is the larger point of view that the work<br /> of the Society does, not only by looking after copyright law,<br /> but in keeping publisbers to their agreements and editors to<br /> their contracts, benefit indirectly all authors.<br /> In the case quoted above the demand for the<br /> return of the MSS. was no doubt reasonable and<br /> justifiable. That has nothing to do with the<br /> question. It is absolutely monstrous that an<br /> individual who is not a member of the Society<br /> should put forward the Society&#039;s name in making<br /> a demand whether it was either reasonable or<br /> the contrary. This danger to the Society, as its<br /> power increases, is a very real one, if only because<br /> it would tend to spread, among those whose action<br /> the Society opposes, a belief that the Committee<br /> of the Society of Authors affords its countenance<br /> to the support of cases and actions which cannot<br /> be justified by any proper thinking person.<br /> G. H. T.<br /> progress of time; hut while in the future they<br /> might not be able to say that“ the pen is mightier<br /> than the sword,” they would go on saying that<br /> the printing press was mightier than the sword.<br /> This invention of multiplying words by a<br /> mechanical process was probably the most impor-<br /> tant, the most far-reaching, and the most revolu-<br /> tionary invention which the world had ever<br /> known. And now printing was going on to fresh<br /> triumphs. Having conquered the art of repro-<br /> ducing words, and so multiplying thoughts, it<br /> was approaching and essaying the art of repro-<br /> ducing pictures. Thus, it not only multiplied<br /> thought, but beauty too, and the process of print-<br /> ing pictures opened a new and magnificent future<br /> to the art of printing. .<br /> The speaker having suggested in his remarks<br /> on Samuel Richardson that they could not do<br /> better than instal a bust to that writer in the St.<br /> Bride Foundation Institute, Mr. PASSMORE<br /> EDWARDS subsequently offered to present a<br /> marble bust as a memorial to the novelist and<br /> an ornament to the building.<br /> -oo<br /> MR. BIRRELL ON EDUCATION.<br /> The prizes gained by students at the Borough-<br /> road Polytechnic, Southwark, were presented on<br /> Nov. 21 by Mr. AUGUSTINE BIRRELL, Q.C., who<br /> remarked that that institute, though only founded<br /> in 1892, had a membership of 3602—more than<br /> the number of students at one time at any of<br /> our Universities; and that its whole work was an<br /> answer to the grumblers who were very full of<br /> what was being done in Germany or America, but<br /> who would not take the trouble to learn of what<br /> was going on at their very doors. In the matter<br /> of education, however, the British were a most<br /> close-fisted nation. As a lawyer he had often<br /> been privately consulted by wealthy men with<br /> money to dispose of, and he had noticed how<br /> averse they always were to anything like educa-<br /> tion. In America, millionaires, who made their<br /> money out of, say, boots and shoes and pork,<br /> often felt it their duty to found a university.<br /> But he did not despair of English millionaires,<br /> poor and distressed as they often were, and<br /> his advice to them was that they would be doing<br /> a minimum of harm if they would but visit<br /> these institutions in their lifetime, and at the<br /> end of it assign to them a fraction of their large<br /> estates.<br /> THI<br /> m<br /> CERTAIN LITERARY SPEECHES.<br /> MR. A. H. HAWKINS IN FLEET-STREET.<br /> D HE St. Bride Foundation Institute, which is<br /> | primarily a technical printers&#039; institute,<br /> - situated in a narrow lane behind Fleet-<br /> street, celebrated its sixth anniversary on the<br /> evening of Nov. 20, when Mr. ANTHONY HOPE<br /> HAWKINS &quot;inaugurated” the Talbot Baines Reed<br /> collection (about 2000 volumes) in the Pass-<br /> ds Library. That library, said Mr.<br /> Hawkins, constituted one more of a long roll of<br /> munificent and wise donations which had been<br /> given by Mr. Passmore Edwards. The volumes<br /> which had been gathered together in the Insti-<br /> tute were examples of works from the best presses<br /> of Europe, from the beginning of the art down to<br /> and including specimens of the Kelmscott Press,<br /> to which the late William Morris bad contributed<br /> so much. Mr. Morris was a great example of the<br /> association between literature and printing : a<br /> great author and a great printer. There was<br /> another connected with the history of the locality,<br /> Samuel Richardson, often called the father of<br /> the English novel ; he was not only a novelist,<br /> but he had the wisdom to ally that precarious<br /> occupation with a good printing business, which<br /> he carried on first in Fleet-street, and after-<br /> wards in Salisbury Court. There were many<br /> arts which would become obsolete with the<br /> THE POET LAUREATE ON THE PRACTICAL<br /> TEMPERAMENT.<br /> The Chaucer Memorial window in St. Saviour&#039;s<br /> Church, Southwark, was unveiled on Oct. 25 by<br /> the Poet Laureate, Mr. ALFRED AUSTIN, who, in<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 127 (#175) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 127<br /> an address, referred to Chaucer as a type of what some fellow-creature not so well endowed with<br /> they all felt to be the English temperament and stability and sense ? In that singular situation I<br /> character. In his love of Nature he anticipated fancy the world would put up its shutters, many<br /> by centuries the life of Wordsworth. This note, pulpits would be vacant, and the business of con-<br /> the love of Nature, was also the note of Burns tinuing the human race would suffer a disastrous<br /> and Scott. But Chaucer was not wholly or exclu- check. I am inclined to think that these mis-<br /> sively insular. From Italy he brought back the fortunes will be averted, and that even the theatres<br /> self-same kind of inspiration which influenced will not close their doors.”<br /> Milton, affected Shakespeare, and laid such hold<br /> on Byron. Then Chaucer had the practical<br /> temperament, the business-like capacity. In his<br /> (Mr. Austin&#039;s) opinion no man could be a great<br /> OF EDITORS.<br /> poet who might not equally have been a successful<br /> man of affairs, a model administrator, a sagacious<br /> statesman, a victorious general, or a circumspect COW may these beings be most successfully<br /> and impressive archbishop. Whether it was<br /> and safely approached ? This is a<br /> because of its limited possession of this practical<br /> question that the journalistic world asks<br /> temperament that the Celtic race, which had itself very often, and to which there has never<br /> produced so many beautiful and exquisite poets, been a satisfactory reply yet. Journalists talk<br /> had not yet produced a really great poet, he would casually of “my editor” as if the term signified<br /> not presume to determine, but he thought it some tame creature who is exclusively the speaker&#039;s<br /> was more or less certain that because of the property, and is kept in the back garden.&quot;<br /> fundamentally practical, weighty, massive element It would be an immense boon to outsiders if<br /> in the English character, England had given the weeklies would try and induce their editors to<br /> birth to the greatest poets, and to the greatest set apart a day once a fortnight in which out-<br /> number of them.<br /> siders, beginners, and the rank and file of<br /> journalism could obtain access to the August<br /> AN ESTIMATE OF MACAULAY.<br /> Presence. Five minutes would be sufficient,<br /> Sir Richard Webb, M.P., delivered a lecture on you can say a lot in five minutes if you know<br /> “Macaulay&quot; at the London Institution on Nov. what you want to say, and I venture to think that<br /> 19, and referred to the charge of partisanship. editors, male and female, would discover many<br /> Every writer, said the lecturer, was entitled to new ideas among these people, ideas which under<br /> his own inferences: what Burke said was true, the present system must inevitably perish and<br /> that historians owed to the public not only their disappear.<br /> knowledge, but their judgment. It was no longer This personally conducted MS. need not be<br /> contended that Macaulay was shallow or super- read then and there, but each author would be<br /> ficial. In the power of telling a story dramati. able to say what induced him or her to think the<br /> cally no writer of fiction had excelled Macaulay, subject treated of was interesting. Then again,<br /> and beyond this power he had another gift more time, stamps, and language would be economised<br /> distinctively his own, that of managing a complex if only editors would be a little more human in<br /> narrative, in which a number of streams were their treatment of MSS. Do not, oh, gentle editor,<br /> tributary to the main current of events. His allow your digesters to keep MSS. until all value<br /> “Essays&quot; were the best of their kind in Europe, has evaporated from them. You would not keep<br /> and no doubt would live ; but when they were tradesmen&#039;s goods sent on approval for fourteen<br /> used for purposes of education, students should days. MSS. are equally goods submitted for<br /> be warned against the errors which many of them approval, and deteriorate by detention ; be kind,<br /> contained. Readers will find a full summary of therefore, in your methods of despatch.<br /> the lecture in the Daily News of Nov. 20.<br /> Digestors know almost at a glance what is or<br /> is not suitable. A well-trained one, in perfect<br /> condition, should be able to assimilate from<br /> Sir HENRY IRVING TO CRITICS OF THE STAGE. twenty-five to thirty-five MSS. between the hours<br /> “ What would become of the world,” said Sir of 9.30 to 6.<br /> Henry Irving to his hosts of the Glasgow Pen Do not ask it to work longer, for a digestor<br /> and Pencil Club on Nov. 22, &quot;if a man were to “off colour” is a most dangerous thing; it sees<br /> undertake no business or pleasure until he had merit where there is none, and flaws in good<br /> first assured himself that under no condition work.<br /> could the same enterprise, perfectly wise and Women, as a rule, make better digestors than<br /> prudent for himself, upset the moral balance of men. They are more patient, and take more<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 128 (#176) ############################################<br /> <br /> i 28<br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> trouble to find the really best, in their opinion; days; for a magazine it will, I am sorry to say,<br /> but, as a rule, they are by no means the best be as many weeks. At the end of the considera-<br /> judges of what is universally interesting. They iion one will be accepted, and orders given for the<br /> are apt to be influenced by pleasant descriptions, other to be returned. So far good. Four days<br /> and what may be described for want of a better is not a long time to wait, and even a newspaper<br /> word as &quot;atmosphere.” In my opinion, a woman article has not lost much of its freshness. But<br /> editor should have a man as digestor—the other does the rejected one return ? Generally not,<br /> way about. In this manner they would counteract unless the discipline in the office is very strict.<br /> each other.<br /> The editor supposes that it has gone, and is much<br /> I have had the editors of the great weeklies in astonished on receiving a letter from the author<br /> my mind when writing this. My perscnal experi. asking its fate. Inquiries are made and the MS.<br /> ence goes to show that when you have obtained is found, but, of course, valueless. Who is to<br /> an interview with the particular editor you are blame? This leads me to think that the question<br /> hunting, he is usually a quiet, pleasant of notice to contributors is largely a question of<br /> mannered person, willing to listen to what you office discipline.<br /> have to say, and quite ready to put your name There is a pleasing feeling rife among writers<br /> down for future use. It does not mean anything, that all MSS. coming to the offices of magazines<br /> though if you happen to be a new hand, you and newspapers are actually read by the editor.<br /> fancy yourself already on the highway to fame This idea is awful to contemplate calmly, and is<br /> and fortune ; at least, it has never meant any. of course a phantom of the author&#039;s brain. No<br /> thing in my case ; but it costs nothing and gives editor of a paper of any size could possibly do<br /> a pleasant, friendly tone to things.<br /> it (and it was a mistake on their part ever to let<br /> There is another person attached to the staff of the idea take root); hence readers, and it is to<br /> a big paper, and that is the manager. I have them that writers should appeal in the first place,<br /> never had the functions of this individual clearly for they are largely to blame. There appears to<br /> explained to me ; at the back of my mind there me to be no rule anywhere as to how long MSS.<br /> dwells a hazy notion that he is a kind of literary are kept before being read. If every newspaper<br /> “ Bill, the Lizard,” and can fill the editorial chair and magazine had a fixed rule as to time it would<br /> or a book of paste cuttings with equal facility. make contributors&#039; lives much easier.<br /> Over and above these things he is probably art · B. How can we draw the attention of editors to<br /> editor (if the paper is pictorial), has to look up this question? This is the real difficulty-editors<br /> the advertisements, to quarrel with the book are hard to approach as individuals, as a body they<br /> stalls and shipping agents, and to be all things to have no being. Someone with pretty manners<br /> all men at the office and out of it. I may be and leisure might be deputed to go round and<br /> wrong in some of my surmises, but I fear the gently draw their attention to this subject, but it<br /> estimate is pretty correct.<br /> would take time and probably lead nowhere.<br /> There is no new light shed by my investigations Some of our chiefs in the Society of Women<br /> on this subject, and unless editors will condescend Journalists are members of this powerful band;<br /> to entertain the one day per fortnight idea, I fear let us, then, approach them with honeyed words and<br /> there will be no amelioration in our lot. The ask them to take the matter up. Let us ask :-<br /> plan can do them no harm and may do us a lot of 1. That accepted MSS. be acknowledged by<br /> F. L. L. post-card at once.<br /> 2. That no MS. be kept longer than seven days<br /> unless reserved for second consideration, when a<br /> At the last meeting of the Society of Women card notifying the fact be sent.<br /> Journalists the subject under discussion was that 3. That accepted MSS. should appear within<br /> of notice to contributors from editors, and the two months of acceptation; if kept longer due<br /> following reflections have presented themselves to notice of probable date to be sent.<br /> me on the subject.<br /> 4. All payments to be made on acceptation, not<br /> A. Are editors personally responsible for due on appearance.<br /> notice? Theoretically they are; legally, all things 5. That the stamps enclosed with MSS. be<br /> done in a newspaper office are supposed to come returned to authors on acceptation.<br /> from the editor&#039;s initiative.<br /> These five requests involve no hardship to any.<br /> Two papers arrive at the office simultaneously; one. The accepted post-card would be printed,<br /> both treat of the same subject, and the editor and only need signature and address.<br /> likes both, but has only space for one. He or No. 2 presents no greater difficulty than that<br /> she will require time to consider. For a news- somebody should see that seven-day-old MSS. are<br /> paper this will be probably from four to five duly read and returned or accepted.<br /> good.<br /> II.<br /> <br /> <br /> ## p. 129 (#177) ############################################<br /> <br /> THE AUTHOR.<br /> 129<br /> N.B.—For the instruction of this department, I Moore, one of his co-directors of the club, took<br /> recommend Rudyard Kipling&#039;s advice vide first the chair.<br /> verse in italics of “The &#039;Ethen” in “ Barrack The reception given to Dr. Conan Doyle was of<br /> Room Ballads.&quot;<br /> a most enthusiastic character, and he made a<br /> No. 3 would check editors in a growing habit characteristic and remarkable speech.<br /> of accepting a great deal more than they are ever Mr. Frankfort Moore proposed his health,<br /> likely to use. The mere fact of a fixed date dwelling under the circumstances naturally upon<br /> appearing against the name of a MS. would be a the part he had taken in the South African<br /> help.<br /> campaign, and Dr. Conan Doyle in response,<br /> No. 4 would remove a heavy strain from the touching on many points of the war, made the<br /> shoulders of the weaker brethren.<br /> following statements :<br /> No. 5 would only affect the office boys, who, it That, in the first instance, not only the War<br /> is my firm belief, annex the stamps and retail Office, but the whole of England, had under-<br /> them. I have only twice had stamps sent back estimated the number of men it would be neces-<br /> to me.<br /> sary to send out — the largest estimate given<br /> Let our editresses approach the editors, pointing by anyone prior to the war was 100,000 men. He<br /> out that, for the honour of the Fourth Estate, these knew that someone would have to prove the scape-<br /> grievances should be looked into.<br /> goat, though the whole nation was really respon-<br /> The Society of Journalists in its might would sible.<br /> easily find means of imposing its will, and life He then touched upon the question of the<br /> would go more smoothly for everyone.<br /> hospitals, and stated that it was geographically<br /> But, above all things, let us do something; impossible for the requisite hospitals to be at the<br /> do not let us be content to say “ Kismet.” That front, when you had to take into consideration<br /> is how abuses grow up.<br /> that an army of 200,000 men had to be supplied<